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Three main factors influence the flow of a flight test sortie: data requirements, test point priority and flight efficiency. For example, consider a test sortie that requires evaluation of stall handling qualities. Data requirements specify which altitude, weight and cg, and configuration are required for each stall test point, for example. Test point ...


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All countries chart Special Use Airspace (with various classifications such as Prohibited, Restricted, Danger, Warning, Alert, etc.) designated for military training, defense or other national security purposes, along with the hours it is active (if not full time). Many national and international authorities also publish lists/maps of conflict zones and risk ...


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Military operations are conducted in certain airspace blocks that should be well marked on your charts. If you are IFR your route should avoid such areas, if you are VFR, hope you know what you are doing.


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That can be selected based on whether the SID is intended for use by your type of aircraft, as well as your aircraft’s performance capabilities and onboard avionics (eg an RNAV SID is useless unless your plane has RNAV equipment aboard or can’t meet the minimum required climb rates, etc.). As stated above, depending on your aircraft type and airport, ATC ...


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The runway(s) in use will depend primarily on the winds at the time, though there are other factors such as maximum arrival/departure rate that may take precedence, especially if the winds aren't very strong. It's disruptive to traffic flow to change the active runway, so when the winds change, they will often wait until there's a natural lull in the traffic ...


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EASA has a general guideline on the topic here


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You need to file a flight plan for each flight in Namibia, submit a clearance/permit request for your intended route (whole trip) with the Namibian CAA, the clearance number is to be added to your flight plan under item 18, other info, and you need to enter the country via port of entry airports, most practically via Upington to Keetmanshoop. I have just ...


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If you look at all the information in a flight plan, the route of flight is a relatively small part of it. Most of the data is about the aircraft (e.g. navigation and safety equipment), crew and passengers, which is used to determine if the flight is legal or by search and rescue folks if the aircraft goes missing. Given the volume of such data and how ...


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Yes, an IFR flightplan can be cancelled at any time. The pilot simply tells ATC "cancelling my IFR flight", then it is cancelled. Depending on airspace classification, ATC may need to issue a clearance to continue as a VFR flight. However, diverting to another destination that originally planned is not the same as cancelling a flightplan. To do so, the ...


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