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General aviation (GA) is one of several classes of aviation activity, military and commercial being the two other main ones. The airliner is a class of aircraft designed to carry a significant payload of passengers and perhaps also freight. Most airliners are used for commercial operation, both scheduled and charter, but not all.


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GA refers to why you fly your plane, not what kind of plane it is. For example, John Travolta has (had?) his own personal Boeing 707, which is the first generation of jet airliner from Boeing. When he flew it, it was not under scheduled service, so it would be classified as a "general aviation" flight.


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How much simulator training does an aspiring general-aviation pilot need? None. I've never had any simulator training, and I've made it through the ranks of "aspiring" GA pilot to reach the exalted status of "actual" GA pilot, and I've never crashed yet. At least not significantly.0 Footnotes 0 = Not Significantly


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Under FAA rules, simulator training is not a requirement for any certificate/license. Only a certain amount of simulator training can be substituted for training in an actual aircraft for each certificate. Even then, only simulators certified by the FAA can be counted towards training time. The cost of the hardware and complexity of the software necessary to ...


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There is no requirement for flight simulator training in general aviation as far as I'm aware but you can save a ton of money during flight training if you use flight simulators. A basic setup could be cheaper than one flight hour and depending on the aircraft you are training for it could save you thousands of dollars/euros in the long run. Even chair ...


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I think it is erroneous to say that lift is solely produced just because of the Bernoulli's or Newton's law. Sixty Symbols(A youtube channel) explains the best how a wing actually produces lift. Instead of explaining I thought this video might help you more than my explanation. And also look at "Incorrect Lift theory" by ...


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The shaft does not tilt, but the disk does. You understand the function of cyclic control correctly. It indeed changes the pitch of the individual blades, shifting the centre of lift. However, the blades are not strong enough to take that much bending load. If the rotor was completely stiff, they'd quickly break off. So instead the blades are allowed to ...


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The blades are hinged near their roots, so they have some degree of freedom, and they flap up and down, so that the disk defined by the path of the blade tips is almost always at an angle with respect to the plane perpendicular to the rotational axle.


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If you have a total electrical failure, then you should try to find a suitable non-towered field to land at. In a C172, you have about 15,000 choices in the US, and unless you're in the mountains, probably only a few minutes away from a decent one. The number of choices goes down as aircraft size goes up, but there shouldn't be any trouble finding one as ...


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In the U.S. (other jurisdictions may be similar)... Avionics are a convenience in VFR day flight. You should be able to fly your airplane by sight picture alone. There are aircraft flying today without any electrical system at all. In a fixed-gear aircraft, none of the equipment required by Part 91.205(b) require electric power. There are standard protocols ...


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According to at least one source (based on NTSB data) there were 179 registered ditchings of GA aircraft over a period of 8 years, or an average of approx 22 per year. The trend however were going downwards from 30 in the mid-80s to 12-15 ditchings in the mid-90s when the study ended. In all 22 fatalities were registered, with an 88% overall survival rate ...


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Today, I took a \$300-\$400 (depending on sale) Bose 700 consumer headset into a Vans RV6A with the Lycoming O-360. I compared it in the same airplane to a Lightspeed Sierra $650 ANR headset whilst engine running. This is not a gimme comparison. The Sierra is very good. The Bose 700 was definitely not any worse than the Lightspeed on headphone noise ...


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In the US, there are no records kept nationally, because they fly under FAR Part 103, and are, for the most part, unregulated. Neither para-motors themselves, nor their pilots are required to be certified. Para-motors are not required to be registered. In fact, there is no actual government regulation requiring training of any kind to fly a para-motor. It is ...


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“If I don't practice one day, I know it; two days, the critics know it; three days, the public knows it.” -- Jascha Heifetz This is a big question to unpack and I don’t know if it has ever been studied. I would guess this really depends on the pilot in question and their personal strengths and weaknesses in their airmanship. Some people need constant ...


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