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1

I did two touch'n'goes there on the weekend. Beforehand, I reviewed the airspace on the way in, and also called SJC tower, and spoke to a manager there, who advised that they'd usually try and accommodate at least one touch'n'go. I approached from the NE Bay (KCCR). Tower and approach want to make sure that approaching flights remain well clear of the busy ...


5

Short answer: Your instructor is correct, if the airport is less than 50 miles away, or is in class B airspace. If it's more than 50 miles away then you don't need to fly there together first. Long answer: It depends on the solo endorsement that your instructor plans to give you. There are two sections of regulations that apply to student solos to other ...


24

It is not only the speed, but the combination of several effects: Landing speed: The much higher wing loading of airliners, even at the end of their trip, results in touchdown speeds in the area of 120 - 150 knots while GA airplanes will have only half that speed at touchdown. The kinetic energy of the rotating tire is proportional to rate of rotation ...


7

The smoke produced from a stationary tire of, say, 12 inches diameter, contacting pavement at 70 kts, is not enough to be clearly visible because there isn't enough heat energy created during the contact and spin-up. You have two big factors at work; the contact velocity is low, and the wheel's inertia is low, so that the tire is able to accelerate to its ...


2

I am a glider and motorglider pilot from Germany. At ours, it's mandatory to have a parachute in gliders (and there was actually one guy i knew who successfully bailed from his glider once due to airframe failure). The glider seats are built with a parachute-wearing pilot in mind. So you can't even sit comfortably in our gliders without a parachute on your ...


3

If you hold an FAA issued PPL from that era, it’s is not subject to any expiration dates or limitations per §61.7 and §61.11. If you need to check the status of your airman certificate, you may do so using the the FAA’s online airman database. If you need a replacement airman certificate, you can contact the FAA and request one online for very little ...


1

The first answer is a perfect answer. Assuming you have your physical license in your possession, you need a new Medical plus a Flight Review from a CFI, who will decide how much training is required to get you to being proficient and safe. The flight review also includes an hour of ground time where the CFI will check your knowledge on subject areas that ...


3

As noted in the comments the only legal things you need to take care of are getting a valid medical and a BFR sign off. AOPA has lots of info on getting back into it. There are a few more things to note: Type rated for Cessna 150/152/172/172RGII Also as noted in the comments the Cessna's you have listed here dont require a type rating so your license is ...


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