New answers tagged

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Inspired by another answer What would be the safest way to drop thousands of small, hard objects from a typical, high wing, GA airplane? (and now I also notice the comment suggesting to freeze the teeth in ice) : make a giant shark's tooth cookie! Mix dough and teeth together in barrel, let harden, cut away barrel, and take mister sharktoothcookie for a ...


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You should consider storing the teeth away for several centuries or millenia until things stabilize a bit, and then doing your project. It's highly likely that the children or grandchildren of people alive today will see a Florida with no significant sandy beaches at all, so spreading the teeth with a gasoline-powered airplane for future children to find ...


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You can only file, and ATC can only assign, one of the listed transitions. However, that doesn't mean you will actually fly it as charted (unless you lose comms). If you filed lower than the charted altitudes, you are not expected to climb. In practice, ATC mau give you direct a later fix (e.g. FZT) where you'll join aircraft descending to your level. Or, if ...


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It sounds like you're concerned that the teeth would fly around uncontrollably after being released and possibly damage the aircraft. Try changing their aerodynamic properties. The answer that mentioned marbles got me thinking that if you rolled the shark's teeth in cookie dough then the teeth would fall through the air in a more predictable fashion. I ...


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You can crack the door on a Cessna 150 or 172 while in flight, probably can most other high wing aircraft. So just crack the door, put a PVC pipe out the door far enough so it is out in the slipstream, and pour your shark's teeth into the pipe. Further away from the tail and easier to manipulate than out the window.


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A nonprofit in Kenya is doing something remarkably similar (link shows the distribution of pellets formed of tree seeds and fertiliser to degraded areas to encourage reforestation). One short observation from the video suggests that the vacuum effect on the end of a flexible pipe hung out of the window of a light aircraft is sufficient to draw small objects ...


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Funeral homes sell gum bags for ashes. They dissolve in the ocean, releasing the ashes. You could make satchels and drop them in bundles with the teeth wrapped in kelp.


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Secure open-top cask or barrel, or other similar container atop wing center section. Partially fill with teeth, leaving ample room between top of toothpile and top of container. Operate from beachside airport with only unpopulated beach and water along route of flight in case some teeth escape. Over drop zone, pitch up and then do -1G pushover to eject ...


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Obtain long collapsible plastic sleeve (I think you can buy this material on a roll somewhere?), cut piece long enough to clear tail, roll up, have passenger deploy out window or door and start shoveling teeth into sleeve with scoop. Even if bag initially deploys above tail, weight of teeth inside sleeve should eventually pull it below? The cockpit end of ...


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Rig a curved PVC tube running from window to behind and below tail and have passenger pour teeth through a big funnel. You may need a fairly large diameter pipe because with this version of pipe idea, the slope of the pipe is small, making it easier for teeth to jam. Maybe the end of the pipe will even drag on ground during taxi and takeoff run or at least ...


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The common technique for scattering ashes is to put them in a small cloth bag, under the wing and well away from the fuselage. Tie the bag with a slipknot, and open it by tugging on the other end of a rope run under the wing to a cockpit window. You can further avoid risk to the airplane body by paying careful attention to the prevailing wind, and making ...


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Spitballing an idea... Not sure of the legality or practicality of this, but it's an idea that came to mind. Using a piece of 2-3" diameter PVC pipe (sized as necessary to clear the largest tooth), attach (very securely - using the appropriate PVC glue and, possibly adding some screws) it to one edge of a sturdy (heavy plastic) box. Add some eye bolts to ...


1

If they were marbles of the same weight, I think you could be sure would not hit tail if just poured out window, but maybe not with those teeth. Here's one solution: remove brace from side window to permit full opening. Put teeth in bag. (Optional: fill extra space in bag with sand to make heavier). Have top of bag tied shut with flaps that will open when ...


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Out the window should work fine, assuming they're as dense as a typical fossil. The "blowback" hazard is with low-density or fine particulate materials such as the human ashes that you hear all the horror stories about. You can fly at a lower airspeed to further improve the clearance from the empennage.


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For one that size, you'll certainly need some spring in the landing gear, but it's likely that shock absorbers are still unneeded. Most models use spring wire landing gear legs, at least up to around 5 kg weight. As big as your model will be, you may need hinged gear legs with spring return, or something similar. I'd suggest looking at the landing gear ...


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Let's start with the air safety video. Being familiar with the "canyon" the pilot tried to fly through (I-80 northeast Utah crossing Parleys Summit) his odds of survival were significantly low. Sadly, he may have been better off attempting to land in Coalville on the interstate. Flying into those conditions, against repeated advice was fatal, as would be ...


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Yes, in some airplanes. Gliders tend to be more unstable in roll than power planes, due to the over banking tendency due the long wingspan. A high sink rate provides a stabilizing effect in roll, due to roll damping, so be sure and bring the power back to idle and use full flaps. (This stabilizing effect due to sink rate due to roll damping may also be ...


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The benefit of using the benign spiral as a means of descent through cloud is to overcome the tendency of pilots with either extremely low instrument flying experience, or no instruments, to make extraneous control inputs based on erroneous sensations. This can result in the pilot believing they are in a normal flight attitude when in fact they are in an ...


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I would not recommend this as a technique to penetrate a cloud layer. My answer assumes that the pilot involved in a non-instrument rated pilot. Otherwise they would just pick up an IFR clearance for the penetration. Before beginning any penetration of a cloud deck without clearance the pilot would have be certain of their position and ascertain the lowest ...


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It works in most gliders because they tend to be neutrally stable in roll and - the big one - have speed limiting spoilers/dive brakes. I'm not sure it's safe to do that in an older glider without speed limiting spoilers. In any case, most power planes, once disturbed beyond the ability of dihedral effect to restore level flight, will naturally descend in ...


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The CP of local sections where the ailerons are deflected should shift aft. In an asymmetric deflection case, very little pitch moment would be generated. For symmetric deflection (e.g. maneuver load alleviation, flaperon), there will be a net pitch moment, but should be small due to the outboard location of the panels, unless the wing is highly swept. To ...


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