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2

There are definitely aircraft which meet some of your criteria, namely range above 800nm and can be flown IFR. I'm not going to list them all, notable examples would be the Mooney M20 series, the Cirrus SR22, Cessna 182 and Cessna 210. No doubt there are more. The issue will be cost, you can find older M20s and Cessnas for your budget, the cheaper they are ...


3

Yes, but. With one notable exception, for any pilot to legally fly an aircraft, they must be rated for that category and class of aircraft. Some (generally larger) types of aircraft also require a type rating. So, if you purchased a Cessna 172 (a very common primary trainer), your CFI would need to be rated for Airplane category, Single Engine Land class (...


15

You are sort of correct. For the ground instruction for your basic Private Pilot Certificate, it would not really matter. For the actual flight instruction, the CFI has to be certificated for the category and class of aircraft in which you are being trained by them. If the aircraft is a taildragger, high performance, and/or complex aircraft, the CFI will ...


4

While the aircraft that you buy could conceivably require your CFI to possess certain additional ratings, such as if you purchase a twin-engine plane or a jet, most smaller, single-engine, prop planes will be covered under your CFI’s Single Engine Land (SEL) rating.


2

Just as a ballpark estimate, a trip like that in a Robinson R44 would likely be your most cost-effective option, and would take approximately 2 hours flight there and 2 back. Even if you get 500 dollars per flight hour and no holdover charge (which would be a stellar deal), you're looking at a minimum of 2,000 dollars for this trip - probably more. Now for ...


0

You only need radar services, usually you pick this up with approach if in flight or you can ask ground or tower for flight following before takeoff, then "Request practice approach NDB/DME-B, VFR". At many class D ground is the same as clearance delivery; even if it is two or three frequencies they only have one controller most of the day that ...


3

When flying VFR from a Class D airport, there is no need to contact clearance delivery to practice IFR approaches. You may, on the other hand, have to call clearance delivery if that is the local procedure for all departures at that airport. This is not very common at a Class D airport. If a clearance is necessary for VFR flights at a Class D airport, most ...


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