New answers tagged

1

A couple of other benefits of VFR-ON-TOP are: In coastal areas (e.g., busy west/east coastal airports) it is common during certain times of the year for a low overcast or fog to exist with tops only 1000 to 3000 feet. If you need to get out of the area you will often need to get line with 15 other IFR departures in front of you. If you request a VFR-ON-TOP ...


4

An unaddressed benefit of going VFR-on-top is the ability to file a flight plan beyond navaid limitations. ATC can issue the clearance, and not worry about distance criteria. An example would be a flight requesting KBFF..KFSD at FL090. Before GNSS and ADSB, I'd give you three choices for such a route: KBFF.V169.RAP.V26.PIR..FSD..KFSD. (Adds 75 miles to the ...


0

For single pilot VFR operations, unless the aircraft is certificated as requiring 2 pilots, FAR 135.105 does not require 2 pilots OR, in the alternative, a 3 axis autopilot in lieu of 2 pilots. Exceptions to this are shown in 135.99 (e.g., using an aircraft with 10 or more passenger seats) and 135.111 (Cat 2 operations). 135.105 must be read along with 135....


2

Multi Axis Autopilot Multi Axis Autopilot is a system which controls an aircraft about the roll and pitch axis (two axis) or roll, pitch and yaw (three axis). Sometimes the rudder has an independent yaw damper incorporated but this is not considered one of the axes in the system. For aircraft with yaw damper - rudder displacement is provided by a command ...


2

To amplify @KennSebesta’s point, to get your Part 107 Certificate you don’t need to hold a current medical, just a pilot certificate and a current BFR. Then take the online course/test. The other alternative is to take a written test on basic airspace rules (§107.73 Knowledge and training.) at a test center then take the online course/test. The written ...


4

Page 1 of Advisary Circular AC61-65H says: Endorsements represent training requirements completed and privileges granted. This AC helps airmen and instructors ensure that all training is completed and documented clearly and concisely. An endorsement marks and formalizes events such as an operating privilege or authorization granted or a limitation incurred....


2

123.300 and 123.500 MHz are recommended by FCC. FCC 87.323: The frequencies 121.950, 123.300 and 123.500 MHz are available for assignment to aviation support stations used for pilot training, coordination of lighter-than-air aircraft operations, or coordination of soaring or free ballooning activities. Applicants for 121.950 MHz must coordinate their ...


1

FAA in AC 90-50, allocates the related frequencies as follows: 121.950: Aviation Instructional and Support 122.750: Aircraft Air-to-Air 122.775: Aviation Instructional and Support 122.850: Special Use and Aviation Support on Non interference Basis 123.025: Helicopter Air-to-Air 123.300: Aviation Support 123.500: Aviation Support Actual use Glider schools ...


0

If you're looking for going to be flying a Rotorcraft category LSA (gyroplane) and you already have gyroplane class privileges, then you already qualify. If you are looking to operate Airplane category SEL class, you need to add those privileges, either with an Airplane PPL or Airplane Sport Pilot aeronautical experience and checkride.


5

ICAO In Doc 9137, Airport Services Manual - Part II Pavement Surface Conditions, ICAO requires 3 levels of friction to be defined at local AIP level. 3.2.11 States should specify three friction levels as follows: a) a design level which establishes the minimum friction level for a newly constructed or resurfaced runway surface; b) a maintenance friction ...


1

I don’t think there is a specific FAA definition of “normal operations” as what is normal will depend on what you’re doing, what you are flying, the condition at the time. I think for all intents and purposes that normal operations are what the Pilot Operating Handbook states for a given aircraft as outlined in the Normal Procedures section. Outside of that ...


0

I don't understand why "the VFR min is 1000/3" If someone is telling you that "the VFR min is 1000/3", then your confusion is warranted. For example, in the daytime in sparsely populated areas in Class G airspace there's no requirement that the ceiling (if present) be 1000' or higher, and you only need 1 mile visibility.


1

91.155(a) sets the VFR minima for the various classes of airspace in general. Note that “1000ft above” means the plane must be 1000ft above the cloud, not vice versa as you wrote. Also, the visibility here is flight visibility. 91.155(c) adds the additional requirement of a 1000ft ceiling within the lateral boundaries of controlled airspace designated to the ...


2

No, you do not need a ferry permit to fly without the transponder[*]. If you wish to fly inside the Mode C veil, it is sufficient to reach out to ATC and ask for permission. For a 10 minute flight that stays low to the ground, I'm sure they'll be happy to help. It makes it easier on them if you can fly when they aren't slammed, but since you're not in their ...


2

This information is not kept in a centralized public database. Manufacturers will also be unlikely to be able to answer such a query because they don't normally keep track of the transactions in which the ownership of the engine changes hands, except maybe indirectly if the engine has been under a continuous maintenance contract with them. I also doubt they ...


-4

There is no dedicated frequency. Depending on where it flies, the pilot should know the local frequency and should file a flight plan. This will put a NOTAM for any other pilot flying through.


3

In 14 CFR 1.1, we find two definitions: Civil aircraft means aircraft other than public aircraft. Public aircraft means any of the following aircraft when not being used for a commercial purpose or to carry an individual other than a crewmember or qualified non-crewmenber: (1) An aircraft used only for the United States Government; an aircraft owned by the ...


0

Most scheduled US carriers operate under part 121, regardless of whether they carry passengers or cargo (or both), and part 121 has an age limit of 65. Unscheduled US carriers (and very small scheduled ones) operate under part 135; neither has an age limit. Either way, keeping a medical certificate can get very challenging with advanced age, as does ...


7

I'm going to answer this from the purely regulatory point of view as asking is you should do something is subjective and therefore off-topic as opinion based. There's no regulation in any jurisdiction I know of that would prevent you from doing this, cross country flying is part of getting your ticket and nothing says you can't do something while you land ...


0

ATC cannot give circling instructions at a non-towered airport. For instance, they can’t say “cleared RNAV 2 Circle 20”. They just clear you for the approach, and you decide if you want/need to circle. All runways are “active”. When there is an (operating) tower, they decide which runways are “active” vs not, and Approach either clears you for an approach to ...


2

ATC-issued circling instructions are, by definition, instructions to land on a certain runway. At untowered airports ATC does not issue landing clearances, or indeed any instructions related to any runway, so obviously they cannot issue circling instructions. See the Pilot/Controller Glossary term and phraseology (emphasis in paragraph mine): CIRCLE-TO-LAND ...


4

14 CFR 91.113(e): Approaching head-on. When aircraft are approaching each other head-on, or nearly so, each pilot of each aircraft shall alter course to the right. There are also directions in 91.113 for right of way if the two aircraft are converging, overtaking or landing. I don’t know if you also consider those a “collision course” or not.


5

The answer to this question really has to do with shared expectations between pilots and controllers with regards to workload. Let’s consider two scenarios: Before the field is in sight – (your question) As an instrument rated pilot, on a filed flight plan with an appropriate equipment code, ATC expects you to be capable of following a published approach ...


1

Typically the type of approach to expect is noted on the ATIS (e.g., ILS, RNAV, Visual [including Charted Visual Flight Procedures -CVFP). It's OK to request an approach not being advertised on the ATIS or the approach you are told to expect by ATC on initial contact with the approach controller (e.g., TRACON). Often the traffic flow requirements to the ...


1

It's perfectly fine to request a visual approach before you have visual reference, just make it clear that you are not ready for the approach yet ("Request visual later on" or something). ATC may still assign you another type of approach if a visual does not fit in the traffic picture.


0

Have a look at this Advisory Circular. There are numerous recommendations involving vegetation, but I couldn't find specific heights for grass mentioned. It DOES recommend lower growing turf, and discing or plowing taller grasses (milo, ryegrass) before they can seed out. https://www.faa.gov/airports/resources/advisory_circulars/index.cfm/go/document.current/...


9

I've found it in two official US government documents where it describes the 5 SM radius for TAFs. One from NOAA: NWS TAFs consist of the expected meteorological conditions significant to aviation at an airport for a specified time period. For the U.S., this is the area within five (5) statute miles (SM) of the center of an airport’s runway complex. Source:...


2

Short answer: as far as I can see, the six endorsements listed in AC 61-65 are the required ones: A.1, A.2, A.41, A.42, A.43, A.45. That's based on the FAA's own internal instructions on how to administer a CFI initial checkride, which say (section 5-500C): C. Record/Logbook Endorsement. An ASI, establishing the eligibility of an applicant for a flight ...


1

There is no definition for the word "flight" in the FARs. I'm not aware of any FAA document that clarifies their intent. The closest I was able to find was only tangential: Clarification of Flight, Duty, and Rest Requirements. In that document, there is discussed "flights" and "flight segments". As an example, there is this ...


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