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1

Another question touched this particular topic so I am linking it for your benefit. When has a pilot legally accepted an ATC clearance or instruction? The consensus is that the pilot is the PIC (Person In Command) and has the final authority. So there is actually no formal or explicit answer to your question.


0

Piling on to an earlier answer, but with some more tangible references. Noting that your post doesn't specify which country you're flying in, there does seem to be an international standard (defined by ICAO). I highly recommend using this resource to help understand several relevant regulations. Starting with the FAA... The FAA regulation is found in ...


1

I couldn't find an FAA regulation, but AC 91-85B Authorization of Aircraft and Operators for Flight in Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) Airspace Document Information page B-4 says 200ft: At cruise FL, the two primary altimeters should agree within 200 ft (60 m) or a lesser value if specified in the aircraft operating manual. (Failure to meet ...


4

On the ground during the preflight check, the altimeters must be within 75 feet of each other. In-flight the altimeters must be within 200 feet of each other. I have been flying the B777 for about 8 years and I have never seen the altimeters disagree by more than about 10 feet, either on the ground or in flight.


18

It depends on the operator's "opspecs" which are negotiated between them and the FAA. Generally in the US the vast majority of part 121 scheduled airline operations are required to be IFR, but plenty of part 135 charters are permitted to fly VFR. They may be subject to weather minimums higher than the general VFR limits.


36

Well, you're using land that is under the authority, or delegated authority, of somebody, so technically you need that authority's permission to use other than a designated landing area under the airport's license. Remember that there could be liability issues for the person responsible for the airport, completely aside from the physical suitability of the ...


52

It depends on the airfield. Landing on grass is only recommended if the ground is maintained to a reasonable standard and clear of obstructions. Some airfields have grass strips maintained for that purpose, on others the grass has lights, wires and cables, or just lots of holes/ruts which will be far worse than the tarmac. Some airfields are only grass, ...


4

Interesting question - although not FAA, I hoped the UK's CAP 413 would hold some insight as it tends to follow ICAO rules: https://publicapps.caa.co.uk/docs/33/CAP413%20MAY16.2.pdf Page 25 is the relevant chapter, and while it doesn't outright say the clearance is not valid it is very strong in its readback requirements. The following language applies to ...


-1

The FAA has generally construed the phrase "surface area of controlled airspace designated for an airport", and other similar phrases, to include E2 airspace but not E3/E4 airspace. It is difficult to explain in a concise way why this should be so-- see the links below for more. E3/E4 airspace is referred to in the FAR's, AIM, and other regulatory documents ...


1

It depends. If you go part 61, then absolutely. If you enroll in a part 141 course, then they will have the flight as part of their training course outline and therefore will require an additional completion in sequence with their course unless they have a way to waiver it upon request, but I think they can only credit entire ratings, not single flights.


2

Yes. It counts. One leg needs to be at least 250NM and you have a 280NM leg. §61.129 Aeronautical experience. (4) Ten hours of solo flight time in a single engine airplane (i) One cross-country flight of not less than 300 nautical miles total distance, with landings at a minimum of three points, one of which is a straight-line distance ...


2

Basics : Why did the event happen? Will it happen again? Curative care is fine, but what about the possibility of the same, or similar, events happening tomorrow/next month/ad astra? The FAA medical standards are for the protection of everyone other than the pilot. I am the proud owner of 6 cardiac stents. But it has become impossible to maintain a ...


4

Because it would impose severe constraints on their design. Factors such as mass distribution make many twin-engine and multi-engine aircraft inherently resistant to spin recovery, despite the large rudder or large rudder moment-arm that is often present on these aircraft. In many cases these aircraft are prone to flat spins. Also, during the recovery ...


-2

I can only speculate on why the FAA does not require it since I don't know their reasoning. Here is why I don't think it is necessary: The primary tool to stop an aircraft from spinning is the rudder: Power to idle Ailerons neutral Rudder opposite the spin until rotation stops Elevator forward to break the stall (What is the Beggs/Mueller ...


2

For this answer: Hard altitude requirement - a fixed altitide which an airplane must be at. (eg. 7000ft) Soft altitude requirement - a window of altitudes for the aircraft to be at (eg. abv. 3500ft, between 9000ft and 12000ft) Using a 757 for all examples unless specified otherwise. A simple FMS may simply assume and use the minimum of a soft requirement ...


0

Regarding how endorsements work, CFR 61.31 says this about complex aircraft. "No person may act as pilot in command unless": (i) Received and logged ground and flight training from an authorized instructor in a complex airplane, or in a full flight simulator or flight training device that is representative of a complex airplane, and has been found ...


3

As far as the FAA is concerned, if it isn't in your logbook, it didn't happen. I suggest trying to get a copy of your military flight records and recreating a logbook (electronic or paper) of your experience to date. You may want a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) to work with you on the first few entries to ensure you're doing it the standard way. ...


5

Well you’ll have to comply with the terms of §61.73 in order to convert your military pilot ratings over to civilian pilot certificates and ratings. You would also need to obtain a logbook endorsement to operate a complex and high-performance airplane legally under the FAA’s rules. This really should not be challenging for you. If you really want to rent a ...


3

No such thing as EPA compliance on General Aviation engines or ultralight engines for that matter. You buy a piston engine from Continental or Lycoming, it has no pollution controls of any kind. It's like it's 1960. There just aren't enough of them to make any real impact, so they get a pass. Pretty much anything goes for a Part 103 Ultralight in the US ...


33

There's no regulation that I can see that says "don't frighten your passengers". And there probably shouldn't be: almost anything could frighten a nervous person who isn't familiar with aircraft, even if the maneuver (or whatever) is completely normal. Having said that, if the FAA thinks you've done something stupid then they do have a 'catch-all' ...


16

First off, the altimeter is visible at various parts in the video, so we have an idea of exactly what is going on. The aircraft enters the "maneuver" at 2900ft and rolls out of it around 2400ft. Assuming that they are over land nearish to sea level, then they are likely always above the required 2000ft for safe altitude. Broadly they are in violation of (...


1

I programmed a virtual FMS for testing of new airways and STARs, and I completely agree with the comment left by @MikeBrass. Ultimately, there is no standard for how FMS systems complete this task as long as they come to the same result. It is very simple trigonometry and other, high school level, math concepts. The FMS knows the 3D coordinates for the ...


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