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Most bizjets have very little room aboard, so they have to choose between lavatory seating and emergency lavatories located under normal seats. Emergency lavatories are a subject of some horror stories rivaling Stephen King himself. So, a small bizjet lavatory is rarely the same thing as a restroom aboard a passenger jet. The usual idea is to try not to ...


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When I was with Weber Aircraft we provided many lavatories for Boeing aircraft. There was never any requirement for a passenger in the lav during structural tests/qualification. Based on this I know that it would be illegal for have someone in the lav during takeoff or landing as it would exceed the structural qual test requirements.


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I assume here that the velocity is held constant. For this, both thrust and drag must have forces of equal magnitude and opposite direction. In short, they just balance each other out.


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The Antonov 124 does not accept the standard ULDs and is very time-consuming to load and onload. While the did have some form of pallets in the early days these were very heavy and added to the non-revenue weight. The 747 freighter on the other hand will accept common commercial pallets/containers or commonly called ULDs (unit load device) and this cuts ...


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The An-124 is not available new: Antonov stopped production in 2014. There are plans to restart production by the end of 2019. Existing aircraft are owned by the Russian air force and by a few specialized freight companies. Neither are likely to sell their aircraft. So the An-124 is not available. If you really wanted to buy An-124s, you'd have to restart ...


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This won’t be a real great answer, just major hurdles off the top of my head for wider AN-124 service. Much shorter range. At 80,000 kg the AN-124 gets 4500 nm. 747-400 has a range of 7670 nm. 1 747 is slightly faster, cruising at .855 Mach AN-124 is designed for a crew of 6; 747 has a crew of 3, or even 2 in the 747-8F It would probably take Antonov a long ...


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Just last year the crash of an Air Niugini flight was directly related to pilots ignoring warnings The captain and first officer ignored a total of 17 audible warnings that they were flying too low. “The crew seemed to have disregarded and talked over all the caution annunciations. The crew had experienced those type of cautions on previous ...


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On May 9th, 2012, a Sukhoi Sukhoi Superjet 100-95 on a demonstration flight in Indonesia crashed into a mountain while in clouds. The Terrain Awareness and Warning System (TAWS) gave warnings, and the crew could have still avoided the terrain up to 24 seconds after the first warning, but they ignored and then inhibited the warnings, commenting that it must ...


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A Valan Air Cargo An-26 crashed in Cote de Ivoire on the 14th of October, 2017, while performing a charter flight. The aircraft descended below minimums on approach and impacted terrain, in this case a water body, short of the runway. Among the contributing factors, the BEA listed "De-activation of EGPWS audible warnings due to nuisance alerts". The ...


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The airlines I worked for usually maintained ETOPS aircraft to ETOPS standards (requiring special checks and procedures) even when on short flights, but did not necessarily operate each flight under ETOPS rules (which would require the extra fuel etc.) - technically, it’s very hard to fit an ETOPS segment into a flight of less than two hours’ duration, ...


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The short answer is No (as per the regulations) The ETOPS regulations state that an aircraft conducting ETOPS operations must be compliant to ETOPS regulations regarding its configuration (based on engine count). But aircraft capable of operating ETOPS flights only need to comply with the Advisory Circular when actually flying ETOPS. In other words the ...


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A notable accident was the Helios Airways Flight 522 crash, where the pressurization system was turned off and the pilots ignored the warning horn because they thought it was the takeoff config warning. From the Wikipedia page: As the aircraft climbed, the pressure inside the cabin gradually decreased. As it passed through an altitude of 12,040 feet (3,...


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Let's assume you started exactly with ICAO minimum fuel required (as explained in What are the ICAO fuel reserve requirements?): Taxi fuel Let's assume you used all of it at your departure airport. Trip fuel Used for the flight to the destination airport. Contingency fuel Let's assume this was used in a holding pattern at the destination. Alternate fuel ...


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You are asking several different questions, but I can answer the first part easily enough. First, let's distinguish between climb rate and climb gradient: climb rate is expressed as feet per minute, climb gradient is expressed in feet per nautical mile. The autopilot I am familiar with can be programmed for a target climb or descent rate, heading and ...


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