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No, there's no regulation saying you can't return to the original aiport from your diversion airport because it would make no sense. There's no reference to give on this because there's nothing in the regulations that is specific to this situation. There's no reason to prevent you from going back to a primary, and every reason to allow it as the conditions ...


3

There are no regulations in the US that state you must land at a particular airport. It will be even more difficult to find one that says you can return to your original destination after announcing or performing a diversion. There are only regulations stating that you have to list a destination airport on an IFR flight plan. And, that there are certain ...


3

When the 737 is a type, the 737-700 (IATA: 73G) and 737-800 (IATA: 738) are sub-types. They have different capacities and differing weights. Other documents will use the word "variants" where your document uses "subtypes". Related info here.


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The fixed cost problem with the hub and spoke model is mainly due to the need for banked flights to minimize average connection times. Ideally, every plane starts the morning at a spoke and arrives at the hub at roughly the same time. Then passengers have an hour or two to change planes, and all the planes fly back to their spokes. This cycle is repeated ...


3

I’ll address your second question first. I'm fundamentally confused about the distinction between fixed and variable costs. Simply put, variable costs are ones that go away if you cancel a flight (or, more likely, a pair of out-and-back flights) while fixed costs are ones you still have to pay. A challenge is that many “fixed” costs are actually step-...


0

"Senior," is generally a subjective term. In order to fly to the lowest authorized minimums one generally needs 100 hours in type, but other than that, one is no longer "green," after accumulating 100 hours in type.


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At my carrier, there are no rules along the lines asked about; the rules that apply are generated by the Schedule Planning department, and will change as they see fit. They produce many schedules each year, and how much "this" one differs from the previous one depends on lots of factors regarding fleets and markets and priorities. Some things are ...


3

In the interest of completeness... expeditedescent's answer correctly describes the effects of the flight-plan closure system. But at least in the USA, the actual mechanics are different. I had confusion about this as well. The terminology used (by the FAA and others) is that controllers will close a flight plan "automatically" if the aircraft ...


14

International Airline crews often spend 1 or 2 days laying over at the destination. In most countries, airline crew members who are listed on the Aircraft Customs and Immigration General Declaration are exempt from Visa requirements. Rules will vary from country to country as to how much travelling freedom you have while staying in the layover country. Most ...


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Here in the US, I have seen several kids solo in gliders at 14 years of age and get their private glider rating at 16 years of age. Glider training is really good training. Glider clubs vary wildly in terms of annual dues and rates for air time and tows. Some are amazingly affordable, others are not. Some have scholarships available to subsidize flight ...


5

The following information is based on US FAA regulations and training programs. In the US, there is no age limit (minimum or maximum) you must be in order to fly at the controls of an aircraft. There are age limits specified in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61. Here are some of the particulars: 14 or older to solo a ballon or glider. 16 ...


2

Maybe start him with balsa/foam gliders that will help him learn about the basics of flight (lift, balance, etc). Toys are kid-friendly versions of things in the world, after all.


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