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0

The cheapest way is to do the basic instrument training in the single, then do the multi rating and check ride separately, then the do some practice approaches and emergencies in the twin and multi simulator to prepare for the multi-IFR checkride, and do that. There's no point in doing an SE check ride. When I did it some years ago I bit the bullet and did ...


3

Groundspeed is the MOST important speed to know when it comes to flight planning, and flight monitoring. If you don’t know how much time it will take to arrive at your destination, you may never arrive. There is is only a finite amount of fuel in your tanks. Every flight has to use estimated groundspeed before the flight, and actual groundspeed during the ...


4

The groundspeed can be more, less or the same as the airspeed. Go back to boats. I'm driving around in my boat on a big river with a 5 mph current. My boat goes 30 mph. If I'm going with the current, my boat is going 35mph relative to the river bottom and the shoreline. If I turn around and go the other way, my boat is going 25mph relative to the river ...


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Airspeed dictates how (and if) a plane flies because it relative to the air that the plane is flying through, the only thing that matters for aerodynamics. Groundspeed can be greater or less than the airspeed depending on which way the air is moving over the ground, i.e. wind. The latter is only important for figuring out when you'll arrive at your ...


25

No, there are no companies offering ejection seat experiences, for many reasons: Cost: Ejection seats are expensive, base costs are somewhere around $100,000 per seat. Seats can't generally be re-used, therefore the cost of an experience is going to be well over that No platform: There are airplanes that are designed to eject someone and keep flying safely, ...


6

Yes, there is. Since ejecting from an aircraft destroys the aircraft, you'll just have to buy one with an ejection seat. I'd recommend an L-39 or a Dassault Alpha Jet. They can be had for about \$1.5-$4 million. After that you can pretty much do whatever you want. Head out over the ocean, pull the ejector handle, wait for the Coast Guard. Seriously ...


1

It's pretty simple. You will be asked to demonstrate everything you've learned. The Grade II is evaluating you and is also evaluating your instructor's teaching skills. The two hour block probably includes extra time allowance if the check instructor wants to give you remedial or supplemental training before signing you off (assuming you are acceptable), ...


5

I'd like to add something to Ron's answer. Use of geographic checkpoints is used a lot in initial training but it can become a debilitating crutch that leaves you in the lurch as soon as you go to another airport. I teach in gliders where getting the circuit right is fairly critical the first time, there being only one chance to land. The really important ...


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I assume by checkpoints you mean visual cues for position. A "checkpoint" is different in the aviation world and is used by VFR pilots to report locations to controllers. These are denoted with a "Flag" on VFR maps. The runway you are landing on is really all the visual reference you need. When flying a circuit you take off and follow centerline, which ...


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You can't transfer an approval so yes, you need to get a new one. From AFSP's Application Guide: TSA cannot transfer your training event request from one flight training provider to another flight training provider. TSA approval is valid only for the flight training provider listed on the training event request. You may desire to build more ...


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