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0

Not being in aviation, I would tend to think that the main reason that signals aren't utility for ground taxiing (which seems the most practical\potentially useful place) is that planes movement are generally setup to prevent the short reaction time we regularly have in cars. "Reasonable" car spacing, and traffic lights, are such that there is ...


-2

Before travel, pilots must file a flight plan, unlike cars where drivers can leave anytime, and choose any route without notifying anyone (as long as it's a road). Some drivers even don't follow road rules and ignore traffic lights while some even drive on pavements & traffic islands or turn/change lanes without indicating. While driving happens mostly ...


3

There are pretty strict rules on how planes should travel on the ground. They are generally directed by ground control in the tower, and if they come upon another plane there are guidelines to who has right of way, and unlike car drivers, pilots generally know and follow the rules.


-1

Aircraft accidents are not caused by "that plane made an unexpected turn", but by "that plane came out of nowhere". Also, cars operate on a flat surface. There are 3 choices: Left, Right, Straight. Aircraft maneuver in 3D. How would turn signals express a climbing turn? A loop?


-1

Although all of these answers are very good (and correct), they are missing an important fact: planes try to go on the most direct routes (unless mountains, or other landmarks that affect flight, are in the way). This means that most planes will be traveling in a straight path, so turns aren't applicable. That too planes are given routes that do not travel ...


7

Airplanes don't coordinate visually because they can't The other answers are correct, but they all seem to miss an important point: airplanes barely see each other! Because (and in contrast to e.g. cars): they can be anywhere in 3D, not just 2D on specific streets they are incredibly fast (think of at least 2x the speed of a car on the highway) they are ...


41

I think the points raised in other answers are good, but they miss the essential difference. Cars choose from a discrete set of options, but planes do not. When you indicate left when driving you are communicating to other traffic that either you are taking the next left turn, or that you're changing lanes (depending on context). In some situations the exact ...


14

Aircraft have radios with which to communicate their intent. Cars do not. Pilots should be utilizing these radios even at uncontrolled airfields. A good mantra to have is that there are no uncontrolled airfields. Just pilot-controlled airfields. I will communicate my intent on the Common Traffic Advisory Frequency before entering the movement area of any ...


63

At uncontrolled airports, there is rarely enough traffic for signals to be needed, and pilots should (though are not required to) communicate with each other on CTAF—an option that cars do not have. In the air, if you're close enough to see a turn signal, you are way too close and need to immediately follow the collision avoidance procedure. More generally, ...


0

True heading is true course ( as plotted on the chart) corrected for the wind. Period. Plus or minus magnetic variation gives you a magnetic heading, then compensation for compass deviation gives you your compass heading. Remember the old adage?...True Virgins Make Dull Company. Works every time.


2

That would be acceptable to me, but probably more information than you need to give. If you have a transponder, we'll give you a squawk code (and perhaps ask for an ident as well) and radar identify you that way. We will then call "radar contact" and advise where we think you are ("two-eight miles northwest of Podunk VOR"). If you don't ...


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