New answers tagged

2

Most bizjets have very little room aboard, so they have to choose between lavatory seating and emergency lavatories located under normal seats. Emergency lavatories are a subject of some horror stories rivaling Stephen King himself. So, a small bizjet lavatory is rarely the same thing as a restroom aboard a passenger jet. The usual idea is to try not to ...


3

When I was with Weber Aircraft we provided many lavatories for Boeing aircraft. There was never any requirement for a passenger in the lav during structural tests/qualification. Based on this I know that it would be illegal for have someone in the lav during takeoff or landing as it would exceed the structural qual test requirements.


8

As an aside to the hold explanations furnished above: to save on fuel, an airliner will reduce power to commence descent at a distance from the airport which will place it at either 1) its anticipated hold altitude, or 2) the landing pattern entry altitude, subject to ATC's instructions, upon arrival in the vicinity of the airport. While at reduced power, ...


15

Airports can accept landing aircraft at a (mostly) fixed, constant rate. However, inbound aircraft arrive at different times and rates based on weather and other factors, regardless of the schedules. This means, at times, aircraft will be coming in faster than the airport can accept them, from many different directions. And airplanes can't just stop mid-air ...


26

It's better to be low(-ish) and ready for a spot to open, than high and far from that spot. As to why, for busy international airports the answer is really simple: ► There isn't a way to manage it near perfectly (yet). To understand that statement, requires some prerequisites, so I'll try to simplify and summarize the basics: There is the concertina ...


6

What are the criteria that govern the choice between titanium, composites, and more common materials, like aluminum? Three main criteria: cost, strength-to-weight ratio, and fatigue resistance. Cost. Of the three, aluminium used to be the clear winner, with composites having made large advances due to improved manufacturing processes. Titanium is the most ...


3

Speed tape is aluminum tape that is much thicker with stronger adhesive than the aluminum tape you get at Home Depot, that is approved for temporary application on external surfaces of airplanes.


1

I have never heard of any procedures or airways that require a minimum airspeed. Having a minimum climb gradient is quite common, typically on departure procedures to ensure terrain clearance. It generally works out in such a way that aircraft with similar performance tend to cruise at the same levels. Most passenger jets cruising around 30,000-40,000 feet ...


2

The way it works is you file your flight plan for the NAT with a proposed Mach #, but when you get your Oceanic Clearance they will assign Mach #s for each segment of the NAT and that's what you have to fly unless cleared for a different speed. The adherence to assigned Mach #s are the only assurance of separation once out of radar coverage. Perusing the ...


1

99% of the time pilots spend on an airplane is basically automated. Flying a strait line doesn't take much input other than making minor adjustments to account for wind direction ect... Landing and takeoff however are the most important and difficult aspects of flying. Precision input is constantly applied to the controls with much less forgiveness when ...


1

A decade is not a long time at all. What the future holds for the next decade is the new aircraft-ATC communication system, CPDLC. All of the focus is on that. Enabling data links between pilots and ATC is a hard prerequisite for any significant autopilot development. It's very possible and likely that nothing revolutionary will happen in autopilots. It's ...


Top 50 recent answers are included