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This is anecdotal, but as a glider owner I can tell you why my glider doesn't have a transponder: Monetary cost: A transponder is a substantial investment which requires recurring inspection. Avionics shops tend not to set up shop out in the boondocks where gliders fly. Energy: a transponder consumes a fair amount of energy and the battery in my plane is ...


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Gliders in Europe are not usually equipped with transponders because most of them have FLARM. As of November 2017, over 35,000 manned aircraft already have a FLARM system installed, including both the legacy Classic FLARM models and the PowerFLARM models. Most FLARM installations are in Europe. Over 50% of all GA aircraft in Europe already have FLARM and ...


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BRS chutes weigh a lot. From a cursory google search, they range from 30 to 100 pounds- 30 pounds is light enough that you could lift it if you’re an average human being, but it’s not insignificant. Glider manufacturers and pilots try to shave every possible bit of weight off the aircraft. While there’s enough risk to wear a parachute, most pilots will not ...


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why aren't sailplanes equipped with ballistic parachutes? Because of their longevity. Most were built or designed before full-airplane parachutes were a thing. When Ballistic Recovery Systems started, their initial offering was for ultralights only. This makes sense because the limited speed range of ultralights makes the parachute simple. Higher top speeds ...


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There is no correlation ... except in Africa: The analysis indicates that there is no correlation between the fatal accident rates and aircraft age up to 27 years of age for commercial jet aircraft with a MTOW greater than 60,000 lbs. Above this age there was a slight increase in the fatal accident rate but the accident rate data is less reliable for these ...


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Opposing viewpoint: BRS are already used in gliders The AC-4C and Phoenix both have models with a fuselage mounted BRS. I'm sure others do as well, I'm simply not familiar with them. I wear a parachute when I fly, but I would much rather have a BRS. It's hardly any heavier but it is much, much more useful, IMHO. A BRS can be triggered from within the safety ...


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Just tell them what you said in your question. "Approach, N23456 I will be off frequency for a couple of minutes to pick up the ATIS for ABC Airport." That should work just fine. If the controller has an issue with that he/she will let you know and respond accordingly depending on existing circumstances. Remember to report back on frequency.


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I found the answer to this on page 11 of FFA Advisory Circular 2023.1309-1E where they define "catastrophic" (this has the same chart as yours later on, so I think it should also apply to yours): Notes: (1) The phrase “are expected to result” is not intended to require 100 percent certainty that the effects will always be catastrophic. ...


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