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In general it is possible to read out the data locally, that is exactly what the Quick Access Recorder (QAR) is intended for. Airlines operate Flight Operation Quality Assurance (FOQA) programs which involves collecting large data sets from Flight Data Recorders (FDR) and QAR, processing the data, generating statistics and analysing the results in order to ...


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From FAA Order JO7110.65 3-2-2. WARNING SIGNAL Direct a general warning signal, alternating red and green, to aircraft or vehicle operators, as appropriate, when: NOTE- The warning signal is not a prohibitive signal and can be followed by any other light signal, as circumstances permit. a. Aircraft are converging and a collision hazard exists. b. Mechanical ...


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Aircrafts have de-ice equipment such as de-icing boots, pitot heat, engine de-ice etc; Not all aircraft (in particular light GA ones) have equipment to deal with structural ice, and ones without it account for most icing-related crashes. Carb ice does cause a crash now and then, but forgetting to apply carb heat is obvious pilot error. Pitot ice won’t ...


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(Source - My many years on fighter jet flightlines. F-111E, F-106, F-15, F-16) Peacetime alert The designated jets are fully preflighted. Munitions fully loaded. INS aligned, IFF code laid in, most but not all of the safety devices removed. The jet is ready to go except for the pilot and engine start. Assigned alert pilots and ground crew are hanging around. ...


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A single steel building does, if the aircraft flies close enough, never mind a city core like those of New York or Chicago. However, the amount of steel isn't the whole story. Each I-beam, sheet of corrugated, or length of rebar has its own magnetic field, mostly determined by its orientation the last time it cooled below its Curie point -- and no effort is ...


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The short answer is no, at least not to an extent that is noticeable or requires pilot compensation to deal with. On the deck of an aircraft carrier with orders of magnitude more steel and signal density, the wet compass can be a bit squirrelly, but it goes away almost as soon as you are airborne. Short duration approaches in the general proximity of a major ...


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Typically you would do a preflight like this, but it's obviously different from place to place, depending on local requirements. Before placing the aircraft on quick response status, you would do the normal preflight procedures like inspecting the aircraft exterior, checking cockpit, following your pre-engine start check, and starting the engine. After this, ...


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Remember those lines are not exposed to the airstream; they are placed in an area that sees little moisture and pressure when the plane is moving. In flight, the flaps will have moved forward, closer to them, and the airbrakes would be lowered shut, so there are not many places for air to flow inside that pocket. One bad (it would require to be flying with ...


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Are those cables and electronics? Cables, yes. Electronics, no, other than a few sensors. Just exposed right into the air like that? Yes! Air is neither corrosive nor an electrical conductor under most conditions. Isn't that bad? Not at all. Some of the smartest minds in engineering designed these systems with one primary goal: safety. Sure, it's on ...


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To complement things mentioned in other answers and comments, in particular the mention of the underside of a car, here is what the undercarriage well looks in a Boeing 737: Neither these pipes and cables nor the ones in the OP, are continuously exposed to the elements, though they do during a landing. They are designed to do so, the same way that the ...


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