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2

ExpediteDescent has done an excellent job of describing how pilots distinguish runways and taxiways. In addition to what he has posted, I would like to add that it boils down to situational awareness and proper prior planning. Runways and taxiways are very well identifiable from there markings, lights, and signs. And, only specially equipped aircraft with ...


35

During daytime and good visibility, it should be pretty obvious that runway markings are white and taxiway markings are yellow. Runways have the runway designator in big white numbers at the end and a dashed centerline, while taxiways have a narrow continuous yellow centerline. During nighttime, you will notice that runway lights are white or yellowish ...


1

Besides the (safety) related minimum altitudes and air control restricted zones for traffic management aspects of environmental (wildlife) protection, noise reduction and capacity/usage hours restrictions from municipal sand states are also a thing to consider. An airport might have existed before a new city district is built, it still might have to adjust ...


4

You said urban area, and that has an effect on things. Crowding Urban airports tend to be crowded out and eliminated. They are a huge piece of real estate that developers lose their minds over, and so any business weakness in the airport is usually attacked by developers aiming to cover the property with condominiums. Meanwhile governments want to turn ...


0

Another reason or benefit to filIng a VFR flight plan when flying over a populated area is if IMC is remotely possible. Depending on where you live and when you fly, possible might develop to probable, then advance to definitely, rather quickly. If you have a VFR flight plan filed, you will already be in the FSS system. It is then easier to convert that VFR ...


7

As far as regulations regarding minimum altitudes, Carlo has given you the official rules. But, the key words are “Except when necessary for takeoff or landing”. In general, airplanes will descend below 500 feet Above Ground Level about a mile or so away from the beginning of the runway, along a straight line leading up to the runway (final approach) when ...


32

Most likely there’s a flight school at the nearby airport and they are conducting dual instruction flights over your neighborhood to practice ground reference maneuvers and possibly emergency procedures. This is perfectly normal and safe. In the United States, the following requirements for minimum safe altitudes are set for general aviation flight per 14 ...


17

The pilots in those planes are learning how to set up and execute a landing approach, which is a procedure in which the pilot follows a defined path through the air next to the airport with several segments in it during which the pilot has to progressively lower his or her altitude in defined steps. Then after taking off again, the pilot has to execute a ...


2

Although I can’t find regulations regarding stabilized approaches in the FAR/AIM, the unofficial but generally accepted definition of a stabilized approach would be “Only small changes in heading/pitch. How small?” Small changes in heading and pitch would mean changes only necessary to maintain a ground track on the lateral guidance and a consistent ...


6

The earliest reference to seat belt signs I can find is Scheduled Air Carrier Rules, 14 C.F.R. (1941) § 61.342 Seat belt sign. An aircraft shall not be operated in scheduled air transportation unless a suitable means for warning passengers to fasten seat belts is provided. [As added by Amdt. 129, CAR, Sept. 5, 1941, effective Oct. 1, 1941, and Amdt. 130, ...


2

Actually, there is one fighter jet that stands out from the rest with regard to its safety record, the Saab JAS-39 Gripen. It has flown for 24 years (32 if you include its first flight and development), is in service with five air forces in all climates and close to 300 have been built. In all this time it has NEVER suffered an engine failure and has only ...


0

Nuclear/atomic bombs and warheads both have elaborate automatic arming mechanisms built into them that have to detect the correct sequence of (for example) acceleration, ambient pressure reduction, free fall, re-entry heat, and g-force in order to enable the firing mechanism for the warhead. If any of these signals is missing or presents itself in the wrong ...


3

Usually it won't set off the payload. The payload is designed in a way to prevent it from going off prematurely - say it needs to be armed before it can go boom. Usually you would only arm the trigger mechanism in the end phase - directly before payload delivery since you want to hit your target and not your own installations. Modern explosives are ...


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