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2

As discussed in this question airplanes carry a lot more than just passengers so shutting down passenger flights can stop the flow of essential supplies as well as people. In some cases charter flights are being used during this crisis but the general movement of people (even essential people) often relies on commercial flights. Similarly most states are ...


0

I think that the second one is the best option. Also, depending on the plane the pilot might be able to shut down the others controls, while leaving his working. That way the suicidal pilot cannot do anything to alter the course of the aircraft.


1

Assuming this happened in the US-- harassing wildlife can be a serious offence on various levels (state, federal, etc) even if no specific FAA regulation has been violated. At least if you can show the pilot knew or should have known that wildlife was being harassed.


3

The question as it stands now is asking one thing in the headline, and the other in the body. I'll answer the latter. In any case of public disturbance your first point of contact is the police. If the disturbance is acute, you may call emergency number (depending on your location 911, 112 or something else). You may also find out what is the aviation ...


3

Most countries will not prosecute pilots for accidents with good reason - the safety system depends on people being open and honest about their actions, so as to ensure someone else does not repeat them. Investigation agencies like the NTSB make it clear that their reports are not intended to assign blame, and so typically cannot be used in court for that ...


3

In the US, negligence would imply willfulness. Errors and accidents don’t imply willfulness nor negligence. That’s the difference between a death caused by an automobile traffic accident due to weather and one caused by a drunk driver. The latter is criminally punishable. The willfulness to do something wrong or not do something right is negligence. Making a ...


0

From a pilot's point of view, yes. I spent 25 years as a commercial pilot, and night flights always had the worst fatalities. I know of several instances where flights were cancelled due to the pilot(s) not turning up due to this fear. During the night, it is harder to make out things like hills, mountains, power stations etc. Basically, the pilot can't ...


3

Example of anticolision lights pattern on military helicopter.. Pilots can select the pattern they want to use according to tactical situation:


7

You aren't going to get rear ended in an airplane, which is the primary safety benefit of headrests. On the other hand, there is still some benefit to having them because in a hard forward crash, if you have shoulder harnesses on, you will probably get rebounded back into the seat to some degree or another, and the headrest will keep your head from snapping ...


15

Why return to Toronto and not stop on the way: Generally speaking the most probable cause for reverting back to an airport that seems an unlikely choice is that the airline has a base there. From a base airport the aircraft is readily available for other use, and crew rotations are easily managed. In addition to that, if the "unsafe to land" condition was ...


11

There are a number of barriers to labeling a single fighter as the "safest" - your proposed method is probably the best overall picture, but there are some barriers to even that. Differences in use and training Fighter aircraft are extremely complex and are asked to performed complex missions, even in training, where there may be little room for error. Due ...


2

"We rate passenger airline flights as 'safe' if there are fewer than X casualties per million flying hours" I am not aware of any official FAA document that states such sentence. However, something similar can be deduced from safety requirements related to the development of aviation systems. ARP4761 is a well-known standard for conducting safety ...


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