New answers tagged

13

Covering an entire runway in foam takes a lot of foam. There may not be any left for post-crash fire. Foam reduces surface friction and brake action, friction isn't always bad, it makes it so that things stop. If you apply foam, you may overrun the runway because you are sliding. Directional control is difficult on foam. Evacuating people into foam means ...


0

Well, it depends on what you mean by "a variant of an existing model" and "controllable". Technically, provided the center of mass does not shift out of range when the heavy tail falls off, a tailless swept wing can in principle be trimmed to fly straight and level. It can also be given effective controls surface. But could "a ...


0

Even if you can still control the plane without the vertical stabilizer, is not the same for the horizontal one, as said by tsg. This because the wing is instable and has the tendency to dive the plane. The function of the horizontal stabilizer is to contrast this tendency. And no matter if the plane is statically balanced because this torque is due to the ...


0

Without the Vertical Stabilizer? Probably - but it would be very difficult. Without the horizontal, on the other hand, is a no. The horizontal stabilizer works by creating lift in the opposite direction of the wings. Moving the elevators increases and decreases the amount of "upside-down" lift, which moves the Center or trimming moves the Center of ...


6

I have been attempting to find information on this question for quite a while, and judging by the lack of answers, I am assuming that Zeus, in the comments to the question, is right: that accidents involving a flight simulator, to the extent that they are severe or sensational, are very rare. More often, accidents would be considered “workplace incidents” ...


9

In my part 91 (VFR, general aviation) training my CFI was more than happy to let me crash in the sim. Others have spoken about sims that took time to reboot/reset, but in the case of the single-engine simulators I used it's all managed via tablet more or less instantly. I definitely "tested the terrain system" in the sim a few times without it ...


21

In the rare cases in the Shuttle Mission Simulator when a training session entered a loss-of-control or other irremediable situation, it was standard practice to freeze the sim rather than run the case to the point that it auto-froze due to ground contact or excessive acceleration. Once it was clear that the situation was irrecoverable, it was a waste of ...


1

If taking off in q tailwind is unsafe (due to loss of lift from reduced air speed) This is incorrect. The airspeed required to take off is the same, no matter the speed of the wind relative to the ground. Taking off in a tailwind is potentially unsafe because the required ground speed is higher. If you take off in a tailwind, you may run out of runway ...


0

Yes, pilots are required to eat different meals on a flight to avoid the risk of pilot incapacitation due to food poisoning. However the FAA and other aviation regulatory bodies haven't set a law to this effect, yet The rule of pilots having different meals in-flight is completely company-specific. Here are certain incidents and near-misses of pilot food ...


6

“Wind” is simply an air mass moving over the ground. When flying, planes do not experience wind per se because they are flying at a (mostly) fixed speed relative to that air mass. We speak of a “headwind” or “tailwind”because the movement of the air either reduces or increases the plane’s speed relative to the ground. We want to takeoff and land with a ...


8

I once had a flight instructor tell me, "As soon as you get airborne, there's no wind." While this is not strictly true in all cases (wind shear is still a thing), it does hold true for flying with the wind. The aircraft is moving in the moving air mass, so the fact that the wind is "coming from" behind you only helps you get to your ...


42

I would say that crashes happen fairly frequently on initial type courses where new pilots are moving up to jets, and mainly on what are called "V1 cuts", where an engine is failed right at rotation or just after. Many are not ready for the hard roll you get with a swept wing airplane when it yaws hard and you are slow to counteract it with rudder. ...


16

In my experience, often the pilot taking the training is in the process of attempting to manage the aircraft during a maneuver (e.g., engine-out go around, rejected takeoff, etc.) and the loss of control/crash takes place so quickly that the sim instructor does not have time to freeze the simulator beforehand. If it is obvious that a crash is imminent and ...


25

If you don't crawl underneath and breathe in the exhaust fumes from the engine, you'll be fine. If you do crawl underneath and breathe in the exhaust fumes, you'll be dead from carbon monoxide poisoning long before any harmful effects from the tetraethyl lead combustion byproducts in the fuel. While you don't want to ingest lots of lead, that won't really ...


4

Any security precaution will be shared with the pilots. Therefore, a determined pilot will know those and be able to find ways to circumvent them beforehand. What are some of the possible precautions? Give both pilots their individual key? Easy - disable the lock before the other pilot leaves the cockpit, maybe by breaking off your own key when it is stuck ...


4

Flying single and twin engine turboprops, it is our practice to check sumps and drains in an identical manner as with gasoline fueled aircraft. Typically this is done at each leg that the engines are shutdown. The manner for inspection is identical. Generally, fuel is collected, and not dumped on the ramp due to the less volatile fuel not evaporating as ...


11

Water and microbiological contamination are a threat to turbine aircraft even if water mixes with kerosene based fuels: Industry-wide, the major threat to FQIS [Fuel Quantity Indication System] availability is microbiological contamination of the fuel (see FAST 38) and water in the fuel tanks. Settled water in the fuel tanks may affect FQIS indications, ...


13

It would make sense if you've ever been involved in a development program. It's important to understand the trade-offs Boeing was faced with. It was either the band-aid, MCAS, or kibosh the program. The "proper" solution to the problem was doing something physical to aircraft; limiting aft C of G, enlarging the tail, stretching the fuselage, or ...


Top 50 recent answers are included