New answers tagged

0

American aviators reference it as Eye-Kay-Oh. If you speak in English to folks in the Aviation industry, they will immediately understand Eye-Kay-Oh. On the contrary, if you said "Eye - See - Eh - Oh", you will probably get a quizzical expression. If you are working in a French (or alternative) language environment, then perhaps they may reference the ...


5

I flew to Libya under humanitarian support in 2013 when there was a civil war going. We flew with the technician to operate cargo doors and one cabin crew to support us. We were carrying a cargo of medicine and food with Airbus A320. It may not be the complete answer of yours but we followed a special procedure as; Malta control was the closest and working ...


2

I have usually seen people in the industry pronounce it as eye-kay-oh. Technically, the correct way would be to pronounce the letters individually as per the English language which is why the dictionary has that but I have never seen anyone pronounce it that way.


0

When doing the validation e.g. in France you will get a validation from an EASA member which enables you to fly an EASA registered plane world-wide. EASA includes registered planes from Austria Belgium Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy Latvia Liechtenstein Lithuania ...


3

No ordinary commercial flight will land at an airport in a disaster zone as you describe. However, it isn't impossible, and special crews trained in disaster relief operations do it all the time. First of all, ATC is not required. All pilots are trained in landing at uncontrolled (aka pilot-controlled) fields, which comprise the vast majority of airports. ...


6

In the U.S. at least, HADR doesn't launch aircraft until a crisis aka disaster has been identified, even if at launch they don't yet know if the problem is lack of potable water or civil unrest over rigged elections. An already flying commercial airliner won't have a glut of doctors and medicine unless it's been chartered for an already identified crisis, ...


2

For this answer: Hard altitude requirement - a fixed altitide which an airplane must be at. (eg. 7000ft) Soft altitude requirement - a window of altitudes for the aircraft to be at (eg. abv. 3500ft, between 9000ft and 12000ft) Using a 757 for all examples unless specified otherwise. A simple FMS may simply assume and use the minimum of a soft requirement ...


1

I programmed a virtual FMS for testing of new airways and STARs, and I completely agree with the comment left by @MikeBrass. Ultimately, there is no standard for how FMS systems complete this task as long as they come to the same result. It is very simple trigonometry and other, high school level, math concepts. The FMS knows the 3D coordinates for the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included