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16

I'd like to add to @DL's answer: Skipping further ahead in time, it wasn't a reroute out of a bottleneck, rather an introduced time delay. Either TBFM (Time Based Flow Management), or sector capacity constraints (though it also happened for northbound traffic). The FAA website confirms Miami (MIA) as one of the airports with TBFM deployed. The military ...


42

This answer assumes the manouevring was related to the Military training activities going on off-shore. While plausible, there is another plausible explanition in ymb1's answer. That was a British Airways Boeing 747 on its way from London to Miami. Just off the coast there is a military exercise going on (see the LJ35 doing circles in the screenshot from ...


23

I don't think they are specifically avoiding Shanwick Oceanic airspace. The reason seems to be related to the airways in the Scottish airspace. In general, you have to file a route using airways when operating in this airspace and there simply isn't one available that provides a more direct route. I recreated what looks like the route you show on skyvector....


5

Generally speaking, ATC doesn't care who you are or where you're going. Their only job is "a safe, orderly and expeditious flow of traffic." If you request to amend the destination on your flight plan, they'll just type it into their computer and give back the new clearance it spits out. Diverting is a fairly routine thing, actually, especially when bad ...


2

It depends entirely on which country the pilot is coming from, and which country he's planning to go to. If you're leaving a country that has more controls on its populace, like China or North Korea, I'm sure that it would be pretty difficult to just fly out of the country whenever you feel like it. But, in the US and a lot of other first-world countries, ...


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