We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

New answers tagged

1

You didn't list a jurisdiction so Ill answer for the FAA: Yes you can continue; Under part 91 you can both start and fly an approach if the conditions are below minimum. If you are flying under part 121 then you can't start the approach but § 121.651 Takeoff and landing weather minimums: IFR: All certificate holders. is going to be the regulation to ...


0

No, at least, not in the way you seem to think. When any aircraft flies, it does so relative to the air, not the ground. So, when you're watching from the ground, the air acts like a treadmill. So, if you've got a 35kt South* wind, and a UAV that's flying North at 25kts, then, from the perspective of the ground, it will be traveling North at 60kts. It will ...


4

As John K already said in the comments, the definition for icing conditions is visible moisture at a TAT of less than 10°C. From the Boeing 737 NG FCOMv1 (SP.16.1 Supplementary Procedures - Adverse Weather): Icing conditions exist when OAT (on the ground) or TAT (in-flight) is 10°C or below and any of the following exist: visible moisture (...


3

Jet streams are influenced by the horizontal temperature gradient between two air masses which creates what is called a "thermal wind component", which when supplemented by the actual wind movement, creates the local acceleration of wind running along the top of the frontal boundary into a jet (above 90kt), and which is always nestled into the warm air side, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included