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1

I would expect to receive radar vectors to final if I was coming from the north into Decatur, IL. However, we do not plan on radar vectors when we flight plan because we could lose our ability to communicate with ATC. I would fly the victor airways to AXC. I might plan on coming in on the 029 radial (V191) to AXC. I am hoping for a clearance for the ...


0

Dave gave a very succinct answer to your question. I might add that in reference to your additional question regarding diverting to another airport, using an altitude above the OROCA or MORA for each successive grid you encounter would be your starting point. If you have two-way communication with ATC, they will direct you to an altitude that provides the ...


2

This article covers the topic quite nicely To begin with, a direct route will only be approved in a radar environment. In many areas of the country this is not an issue. The pilot, however, must be aware that filing an altitude at or near the OROCA (Off-Route Obstruction Clearance Altitude) may not guarantee radar coverage. In that case, the pilot should ...


1

I think there is some term jumbling here that can likely be cleared up with the statement: Circling minimums do not necessarily imply you are going to execute a "circle-to-land" maneuver A circle-to-land maneuver is a low altitude, close to the field, turning maneuver that allows you to use an approach set up for a given runway but ultimately ...


1

An FAA-appointed Designated Pilot Examiner has recently told me that it is legal to fly an airplane or glider in clouds in Class G airspace with no clearance, if the aircraft is appropriately equipped and the pilot has an instrument rating in airplanes. On the other hand, here is a case, originally noted in an answer to a related question on ASE, where a ...


2

There's another consideration: cost. Specifically, company overhead cost. If you're flying commercially (let's focus on Part 135 to keep it simple), you cannot just "do an IFR flight" if/when A) the pilot is qualified and current, and B) the helicopter is certified and capable. Just because the FARs say you can, doesn't mean you can. Every ...


17

Helicopter IFR operations do exist, but the short answer to the thrust of your question is: helicopter IFR is inherently more dangerous than fixed-wing IFR due to the lack of stability. A properly trimmed fixed-wing aircraft in good conditions could fly upwards of 30 seconds without pilot intervention, whereas a helicopter needs almost continual control ...


23

Helicopters do not avoid IFR. They will, however, try to avoid IMC for safety reasons. The same is true for airplanes in the same weight class. Just because the pilot is IFR rated and the aircraft is IFR certified, it does not mean they will always fly IFR, whether they are fixed or rotary wing. Light aircraft in general don’t do well in extreme IMC, whether ...


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See AIM 5-5-13. The clearance must be requested in the flight plan or subsequently. 5-5-13(a)(1) and AIM 4-4-8. There are 3 requirements: 1) The pilot must fly at an appropriate VFR altitude as defined in 14CFR91.159, comply with VFR visibility and cloud clearance as established in 14CFE91.155 and finally, comply with the IFR rules applicable to the flight. ...


2

Considering, as a pilot, you should be able to maintain an altitude with Less than a 100 foot accuracy, I would say that you should be doing the same when VFR-on-Top. If you change (vacate) that altitude for any reason, you should let ATC know. They are still maintaining aircraft separation. They need to anticipate your current and future position. If it’s a ...


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