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Generally speaking the 1000feet would be the critical part and assumes no more than 200ft/nm climb unless a specific minimum climb grade is stated on the plate. If the following turn requires some obstacle avoidance they will give a heading to intercept a particular radial. Simply "direct to" implies that there is plenty of lateral clearance once ...


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I have never been given a QFE to conduct an instrument approach in S.A. It does happen in some countries but then everyone has to use it. If you look on an approach chart you will see the vertical profile is given in terms of height above sea level so you wouldn't be able to conduct the approach with QFE set. Edit: The SACAA charts do show height of the ...


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Or you can depart on a IFR flight plan and when airborne request a "VFR climb to ___ (terrain plus 1000 feet or 2000 in mountainous terrain or MVA). You have now accepted responsibility for terrain clearance. The controller will still vector you for traffic seperation.


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First of all, an RNP 1 procedure requires a GPS/ GNSS. And as you have said, it requires an inbuilt navigation monitoring and an alerting system. On the other hand, an RNAV 1 procedure does not. In RNAV 1 you can get navigational aid from the IRS/ VOR/ DME or IRS/ DME/ DME. The SIDs and STARs can either be RNAV 1 or RNP 1. RNAV 1 is the system introduced at ...


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Operating as PIC under IFR always requires an instrument rating and currency, regardless of flight conditions. 14 CFR 61.3(e) requires the rating, and there's no exception for VFR conditions: (e) Instrument rating. No person may act as pilot in command of a civil aircraft under IFR or in weather conditions less than the minimums prescribed for VFR flight ...


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You only need radar services, usually you pick this up with approach if in flight or you can ask ground or tower for flight following before takeoff, then "Request practice approach NDB/DME-B, VFR". At many class D ground is the same as clearance delivery; even if it is two or three frequencies they only have one controller most of the day that ...


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IFR approved airplanes require a sensitive altimeter and not just a plain altimeter. When you look at FAA FAR 91.205 you will see a distinction between altimeter for DAY VFR and a sensitive altimeter for IFR. A sensitive altimeter has a Kollsman window and you can adjust the altitude for the current altimeter setting. Once the altimeter setting is set in, ...


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When flying VFR from a Class D airport, there is no need to contact clearance delivery to practice IFR approaches. You may, on the other hand, have to call clearance delivery if that is the local procedure for all departures at that airport. This is not very common at a Class D airport. If a clearance is necessary for VFR flights at a Class D airport, most ...


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Barometric pressure isn't a constant. Just because you're at sea level, doesn't mean the air pressure is going to be exactly 29.9212 inHg. That's just the average sea-level pressure. So, for instance, if the sea level pressure is currently 30.9 inHg, then all altimeters in the region are going to read 1000 feet below the actual altitude of the airplane. ...


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As Ron Beyer’s answer stated, JFK Jr. was roughly halfway through the practical portion of his instrument training. He had completed the knowledge test but was not ready to do the checkride. What happened to him was really getting into an extremely insidious situation which, based on his flying experience, it’s reasonable to believe he could not have ...


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From the NTSB accident report: Pilot Training On October 4, 1982, the pilot started receiving flight instruction. Over the next 6 years, he flew with six different CFIs. During this period, the pilot logged 47 hours, consisting of 46 hours of dual instruction and 1 hour without a CFI on board. The pilot made no entries in his logbook from September 1988 to ...


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