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2

There is no penalty per se, but visual approaches in particular have lower separation requirements, so having to switch you back to a non-visual approach may require ATC to make corrections (e.g. delay vectors, speed control or, in extreme cases, a missed approach), which may feel like a penalty.


4

It's no problem, just tell Approach you actually want vectors for the ILS. They'll give you what you request.


0

The answers already provided are very good, this answer is meant to say the same thing in different terms, not to contradict what has already been written. A primary instrument is one that provides a value for you to hold. If you want to maintain 5,000 feet, then the altimeter is the primary instrument because though there are other instruments that can ...


1

The whole point of classifying primary or secondary instrument (or the other method control-performance) is to teach pilots to look at what is important during different phases of flight. When you read the Instrument Flying Handbook, it will tell you what instruments are primary and what instruments are secondary. For example, in straight and level ...


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"Why can't we use just one as a primary instrument?" -- sometimes we can. I've seen video of a Cessna 120 being flown in cloud with all gyro instruments covered up. The pilot's hands were not touching the control stick or throttle. The airspeed, tachometer, altimeter, and vertical speed indicator (if present) were not covered up, but they might as well ...


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Because during certain maneuvers, certain instruments provide more relevant information to a pilot than do others. In straight and level flight, the heading indicator provides more relevant bank information as it tells you whether your current bank attitude is maintaining the desired heading. The altimeter is providing the most relevant pitch information ...


1

The only takeoff departure at Las Crucas, NM (KLRU) is a visual climb over airfield (VCOA). Typically you would depart the airport and visually see and avoid the obstacles around the airport while you climb. If you are in IMC conditions (at this airport) you need 2500' ceilings and 3SM visibility to circle and climb above the airfield. In essence, the ...


1

This is an Obstacle Departure so this is not assigned by ATC. Some obstacle departures are textual based and some have an image depiction of the departure, such as this one. Part 91 pilots are not required to follow Obstacle Departures under an IFR flight plane but it is highly encouraged. Commercial flights must follow Obstacle Departure procedures and ...


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Items in parentheses on these charts are not said when referring to them by name. It's the same for other departures/arrivals that are RNAV, and for approaches that may be GPS or RNP.


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It's called the "Phoenix One Departure", exactly as depicted in the title. Why do you think it would be something else?


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Remember that the helicopter visibility restriction also applies to IFR departures. under part 135, you can depart IFR without a takeoff alternate if you have the visibility to shoot the approach straight in, and all the equipment is working... this visibility can be cut in half unless it says helicopter vis reduction N/A. So, looking at this approach ...


1

The details will vary by country, but in general, if you cross a border, you will need to get permission from one or both countries, file a flight plan and be talking to ATC/FIS as you cross. If you want to land in another country, you will need to do so at a designated port of entry. In some countries, you must also leave from a port of entry. The term "...


3

A famous US/Canada example is Niagara Falls. As as student, part of my cross-country test involved flying a circuit around the Falls, which meant passing the international border. No special permission was required. If I'd gone anywhere near the American airport (top right of map), the situation would have been completely different though. Note that even ...


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