New answers tagged

4

In the Center environment, at a non-towered airport, if you're cleared for a specific approach, that's what is being protected, including circling, and the missed approach. There is no provision for a pilot to change the approach without contacting ATC. Also, controllers do not clear for "circle to land", or any other runway "landing" ...


3

I built a calculator to help with these types of calculations. https://my.rockymountainflight.com/canpa You can input the icao identifier for an airport. I pull up the current METAR for you. You input the altitude, altimeter setting, temperature, indicated/calibrated airspeed and wind velocity, degrees the wind is off from the runway heading, altitude to ...


16

US-based answer. No, the specific instrument approach is not part of the flight plan and is not included in the initial IFR clearance. The flight plan is just that, a plan. It can change in flight, due to weather, immediate traffic, traffic congestion (enroute or at the destination), or pilot's request. If an airport has a Standard Terminal Arrival Route (...


12

What you’re missing is that DJL8W is a Standard Terminal Arrival Procedure (STAR) to the Paris area. Here is an (out of date) chart: This procedure takes you from DJL to OKIPA, which is an Initial Approach Fix (IAF) for all of the Instrument Approach Procedures (IAP) into LFPG. For instance, here is an (out of date) chart for the RNAV 27R: In the real ...


2

To add to Dave’s answer... Just because this hold pattern is used as a Missed Approach holding pattern and as a waypoint when joining the procedure from the IAF VORTAC, it does not mean the hold could not be used for other purposes. An aircraft could fly to JAROD as an Initial Approach Fix from any direction and use the hold to descend down to 3900 feet MSL. ...


1

In instrument flight, when a Radial is given, it is always the “From” indicated radial on your OBS. In vectoring, turning an aircraft at acute angles is avoided. Flying a Heading of 120° to intercept a Radial of 150°, your only option would be to turn toward a course of 150° degrees (Southeast) until reaching 9000 feet MSL. The field elevation is already ...


2

So that it keeps you under the shelf of the adjoining bravo airspace and because the decent gradient may be steep enough to require an upper limit. As discussed here: The instrument approach procedure Holding Pattern In Lieu Of Procedure Turn (HILPT) is designed to facilitate alignment with the final approach course. The descent gradient from the HILPT ...


1

If you have the time on your hands might as well get started with the study part. IATRA is the ATPLs condensed into a single smaller 50 question exam. You will expand your knowledge base and it never hurts to acquire knowledge sooner rather than later. Don't take the exam right away though, as it is only good for 2 years and it might be a lot longer than ...


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