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The entry of a hold is sufficient for the holding procedures task on the instrument rating practical test in the US and for execution of an instrument approach procedure that begins with a hold, so it follows that it would also be the appropriate standard of completion for currency purposes regarding the required holding procedure. I think the text you ...


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I'm sure someone may have a more specific answer, but I would simply consider an entry and one lap (back to the fix) as a loggable hold. I wouldn't personally log less than one lap because I didn't really practice the technique, timing, and protected side management that completing an entire lap entails.


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Found this definition on an FAA website today: The runway touchdown zone is usually defined as 1000 feet from the runway threshold or 1/3 the total available landing distance. This provides runway “underrun” in case the pilot comes up short of his/her aim point, as well as increased obstacle clearance while on final approach.


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Airspace class is not the same as airspace ownership. TRACONs own a larger (often far, far larger) chunk of airspace, both horizontally and vertically, than is designated class B/C/TRSA. You can see rough maps of airspace owned by TRACONs in the answers to this question. Unfortunately, exact dimensions are not published anywhere by the FAA, so all we have ...


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The commenters have a good point that the SOP documents you liked are for hobbyist simulation and are not necessarily faithful reproductions of real-world procedures. But even in the real world who owns which specific volume of the air at which specific altitudes is not necessarily correlated with the regulatory airspace class for a given volume of air at a ...


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When given a CRUISE clearance [...] where does it say you don't have to report altitude changes. In my opinion, it say that by implication in the text you quoted, emphasis mine: The pilot may level off at any intermediate altitude within this block of airspace. Climb/descent within the block is to be made at the discretion of the pilot. However, once the ...


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Your Questions: When given a CRUISE clearance (which includes a block altitude assignment from MEA to CRUISE altitude) where does it say that a pilot must report altitude changes (climbs or descents) within the block altitude. If not, then where does it say you don't have to report altitude changes. Answer: The regulations do not mandate that a pilot ...


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Is this something that you have experienced yourself? If so an example would be helpful. Approaching a feeder route and hearing "Maintain... until established" imply two separate situations, to my ear. From a controller's standpoint, if you are operating on an unpublished route (radar vectors or direct the IAF or similar), we follow the 7110.65 4–8–...


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The key issue here seems to me how to set up the instruments and what the indications will be. For an HSI you set the CDI to the front course, i.e. in this case to 303 and you will get correct sensing. For the old CDI/OBS because you are going “backwards” on a backcourse, you will get correct sensing (as the chart states). The reason they appear to have used ...


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