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There is the General Aviation Terminal (GAT) in Frankfurt that is handling "executive and private aviation flights" as they say. General aviation airplanes and helicopters are handled at this GAT that is open 24 hours per day. I think the best is to contact them. Some additional rules related to GA in Frankfurt can be found here. Bus service is mandatory ...


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By too far do you mean outside the fwd limit? If yes then is a question of the elevator having insufficient 'arm' to counter the increased 'arm' of the (too fwd)CG. If the CG is within limits or even 'on' the fwd limit then the airplane should have no problems with elevator effectiveness. Airlines usually add a bit onto the manufacturer's limit as the ...


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The elevator is producing downward lift. It is you pushing down at one end of the teeter totter. Your kid is sitting on the other end of the teeter totter, and the teeter totter's center of gravity is somewhere between the pivot and your kid. If you stop pushing down, he drops. If your kid moves farther out, say by leaning back, you may not have the ...


3

One intuitive way to think about this is that the pitching motion of a rigid body occurs at its CG. At forward CG, the elevator, which pitches the aircraft up, indeed has a longer moment arm. On the other hand, however, the wing lift vector, which tends to pitch the aircraft down, also has a longer moment arm. The proportion of change of the wing lift moment ...


1

If you go to www.skyvector.com and zoom in to MRB (easy to enter a flight from KOKV to KMRB to find it quick) Select the World VFR view, and you will see no navaids at that location. Select the Enroute L-29 view, and you will see no navaids at that location. So no, it is not a type of currently used navigation aid. If you peruse the Instrument approaches ...


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