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The only case where I would consider an advantage or disadvantage may be observed in selective airflow is in that single engine German observation aircraft of WW2, the Blom & Voss 141 where the single engine is located to the starboard of the fuselage. Albeit the propeller is located forward of the main body, but the prop wash may have a disproportionate ...


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The Helios was an electric powered prop driven aircraft that achieved an altitude of over 96,000 feet and maintained it in level flight for more than 40 minutes. as altitude increases You maintain wing lift with constant IAS until the wing airflow approaches the speed of sound (TAS increases). Shaft power output must increase to spin prop faster to ...


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First let's look at the difference between IAS and TAS TAS is your true airspeed and is independent of altitude, it's the speed at which you're moving through air. If there is no wind it is equal to your airspeed. On the other hand IAS is the airspeed you read on your flight instruments as indicated airspeed and is a function of the dynamic pressure. Your ...


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"No stall speed" just means no stall break in the traditional sense. The AN-2's slatted wing's maximum AOA is very high (typically about 10+ degrees higher than un-slatted, or mid-high 20s vs mid teens) and there isn't enough tail power to get the AOA high enough to get any kind of break. Stall speed is normally published as the speed at which the ...


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Generally speaking, the stall speed doesn't exist as the actual speed at which you might stall a wing depend on the loading of the wing. In a 60° level turn you'll experience a force of 2g's and the stall speed of any given aircraft will be increased by roughly 1.5. What is important is the stall angle of attack (AOA) which is defined by the profile of the ...


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In theory, GD is 1.3 times the stall speed. The formula is: $$ V_\text{GD} = \sqrt{\frac{2 m g}{C_L r S}} \times 1.3 $$ Where: $m$ is mass, $r$ is density, $g$ is gravity, $C_L$ is max coefficient of lift and $S$ surface of wing In level flight $g = 1$, but when banking $g$ should increase, therefore the GD should (in theory) go higher in the speed tape. At ...


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The Green Dot speed is very stable on the PFD, unlike for example VLS which is a function of G (bank included), mach number and speed brake position. According to Flight Crew Ops Manual(s) green dot speed varies only as a function of aircraft weight and altitude. For A320 a very crude formula is given: below 20000ft 2 x weight in tons + 85kts, above 20000ft ...


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According to the FAA, the short answer to your question is approximately "halfway between Vx and Vy." While there is a lot of physics and calculus that can give a precise answer to this question, there is another answer that uses "pilot math". The FAA has a nice publication titled Best Glide Speed and Distance, which explains that there ...


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Instrument Landing Systems routinely undergo maintenance and it is common to have the Glide Path unserviceable while the Localizer is still serviceable. An aircraft can still make an approach and land, but the approach is now classified as a Localizer approach. The weather limit minimums are increased from the usual 200’ above ground, to approximately 300-...


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The question is a little ambiguous. This is assuming you can get clearance for the approach and that it has not been NOTAMed as completely out of service. If you are asking about the procedure if the glideslope vertical guidance transmitter is inoperative, in most cases you treat the approach as a LOC localizer or LNAV only approach. You would use the LOC/...


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