New answers tagged

1

it’s dependent upon the aircraft in question and the approach speed that they need to use, but assuming a fighter aircraft like an F-18 with an approach speed somewhere in the neighborhood of 130 knots a typical 3.5° glideslope to impact yields a descent rate on somewhere between 600-700fpm. The faster the ship is moving at the greater the surface winds it’...


22

German fighters used the BSK 16 (Ballistische Schussmess Kamera [Ballistic Shot Measurement Camera] 16mm) which was mounted in the wing root in case of single-engine aircraft. Twins would carry the camera usually in the fuselage nose. It contained black&white film material for a maximum of 200 seconds of filming. Activation was either together with the ...


0

You are right on all accounts. In a steady-state turn, from circular motion, we have, with $F_c$ being centripetal force, $V$ being airspeed in zero wind, $R$ being the radius of turn, and $m$ being the aircraft mass: $$F_c=m\frac{V^2}{R}$$ The centripetal acceleration in a coordinated turn is created from the banked lift vector ($L$), therefore, with $\...


26

It was a small 16mm film camera usually mounted, in single engine fighters, in the inboard area of the wing, within the leading edge behind a little window (the P-38's is also about the same location between the center pod and left engine) or in the nose in twins. Look carefully at a lot of gun camera film on something like a P-51 when the sun is lighting ...


3

No, there isn't any single rule of thumb for airframe shape. Just look at the huge variety of airframes that have been built and flown over the years. One way to scratch-build is to start with a cardboard glider that's roughly the shape you want. Tape the wings and tail to the fuselage in different places, tape on some noseweight, give it a toss, deflect ...


4

This is going to involve a lot of speculation! I'd guess that White Knight Two will have to fly at approximately airliner speeds once it reaches altitude, otherwise it will stall in the thin air. Total flight time of the combination is expected to be 2.5 hours, which gives a range of about 2500km (if we optimistically assume it does Mach 0.8 the whole time,...


0

I'd say yes, it's possible. I read about a late pilot testing modifications in his Velocity Canard; in flight, one of the propeller blades was lost, no thrust; instead of pushing the stick, the pilot pull, with the result of airplane entering a flat high speed fall into the ground, impossible to revert. This is also a caution about the not 100% true belief ...


1

"What would happen if the thickness...are same throughout the wing". This is known as a "Hershey bar" wing, and is an excellent general purpose, easy to build wing for models and full scale aviation aircraft alike. Aircraft designers add twist or "washout" to wings to prevent the entire wing from stalling at once. Washout lowers the angle of attack of the ...


-1

It is not possible to have the rudder deflection because the huge amount of AOA and control law take that in consideration and cancel (fadeaway) the pilot rudder inputs.Activating the MPO the slabs moved max in order to get the nose down to lower AOA and after that we can get responses from the rudder


3

If the airfoil profile does not change along the span, then we can expect the entire wing to enter a stall condition at the same time. This means the stall break will be sudden and sharp. If instead we transition between several different airfoil profiles along the span of the wing, we can get different portions of the wing to stall at different airspeeds/...


1

I don't know why but this configuration has always appealed to me. Fits my eyes. I have been tinkering with this design making my own adjustments and there is a lot that can be done. Just a thought. Good luck!


5

For an estimate, we can use the Brequet range equation: $range = V\cdot t_f = \frac{L}{D} \times I_{sp} \times \ln\left(\frac{W_i}{W_f}\right) $ with: $V$: optimal velocity $t_f$: flight time $L$: lift $D$: drag $I_{sp}$: propulsion efficiency $W_i$: initial weight $W_f$: final weight Assuming the lift to drag ratio $\left(\frac{L}{D}\right)$ and the ...


1

It can travel 4259 kilometers or 2647 miles loaded, but I am not sure if Airbus would have a need to publicly document the information of the unloaded range - I doubt this information is accessible.


0

Please find the answers below from "World war II fighter aerodynamics" by David Lednicer. And L/D, of course, depends on the CL you are flying at but you can easily calculate it from the unambiguous drag area given


4

The top speed depends on the type of the airship. While the first designs were non-rigid, it became soon obvious that useable speeds could best be achieved with rigid designs because the higher dynamic pressure at higher speeds required more internal pressure to maintain the hull's shape. Given the low strength of early hull materials, the internal pressure ...


0

There will still be airflow over both the body and the wings of the F-16 or any other aircraft when it flies supersonic. Moreover, the F-16 features a blended wing-body which makes it hard to strictly separate the two. The body of the aircraft produces some amount of lift. Your question seems to ask if this lift is required, at supersonic speeds in ...


0

The drag increases with the square of speed. Since thrust only slightly overcomes drag, doubling the thrust only results in a 40% increase of speed. In the case of a dirigible, doubling the thrust won’t double the speed. It will only increase the speed by 40%. There are other factors to account. Once the flow approaches transonic speeds meaning the speed ...


3

Comparison of two giants from the golden age of airships LZ 127 Graf Zeppelin and LZ 129 Hindenburg provides some useful information on your proposed scaling. Both airships were around 800 feet long and cruised at 80 - 85 mph. Hindenburg was 35 feet wider, with more than double the lifting capacity, but required 4 x 1200 hp compared with 5 x 550 hp of the ...


2

As for the weight vs. speed: a rigid or semirigid airship has a max takeoff weight, which depends on it's size (because the size pretty much determines the max lift). If this airship was to fly, say, only half of the max weight, it would not go any faster, as the drag would be the same because the size does not change. An airship may lift a load heavier ...


7

I'll do this without most of the math since your target audience won't want to read equations in your story. In the simplest terms, the maximum speed of an airship occurs when the maximum thrust generated by its engines is equal to the drag it experiences while being pushed through the air at that speed. That drag depends on the diameter and length of the ...


49

No, the helicopters are standard production versions. The Eurocopter AS350 is a common model used for these operations. In 2005, Didier Delsalle landed a Eurocopter AS350 B3 on the summit of Mt. Everest at 29,029 feet (8848m) (twice). The only changes he made to the standard version were removing a few things like extra seats to reduce the weight, and of ...


6

As mentioned in this answer: stick forces are designed into the control feel. The best feedback for the pilots on how large their control input is, is haptic feedback: push/pull force as detected by the force transducers in our hands. While looking out of a cockpit window, we don't exactly know where our hands are, but we don't have to look at our hands to ...


16

No because if stick force per G is too low, when maneuvering it becomes too easy to pull a lot of G and that's bad. It's like having power brakes in your car that don't build up more resistance in the pedal the harder you brake; it becomes difficult to regulate braking effort and too easy to lock the brakes (assuming no ABS). Like with brakes, it's ...


0

any aircraft has an optimal altitude for cruising. account for burn at takeoff and landing, then the cruising altitude is the one minimizing the costs. since combustible is the main cost, then is easy to determine which altitude is the economical one, even customized for the trip length and wind direction. however, for practical reasons and separation of air ...


0

To answer based on some data I had correlating aircraft in confirmed holding patterns (not speed-restricted en-route delays) vs. high altitude cruise, the short answer was: they use more - mostly because they were in low-speed manouevring, with flaps set. I'd have to look at the data again to remember how much more, but I recall it was fairly significant: at ...


4

Rather than put up with one us speculating and pontificating on what to do, just read this terrific account of the Air Canada Gimli Glider incident, where a '67 did exactly that. They pretty much did it right, helped by a Capt that really knew how to fly as opposed to just being competent at running the machinery.


3

To answer the other part of your question, in a scenario where you lose all 3 speed indications, you are left with pitch and power. If you know the airplane really well and are sufficiently skilled at flying, this should be enough. For example if you've been flying some jet for a while you will know that at Vref on a 3 degree glide slope flaps and gear ...


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