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14

This is called a "safety factor", and I was actually taught to use 1.33! When you look at the POH or AFM the numbers and charts they present for performance figures were invariably calculated using a near-perfect/brand new aircraft, with a highly skilled test pilot. That club aircraft you're learning in may well be older than you are, the ...


6

As has already been pointed out, a lot of the data are not results of a (single) formula. Besides (non-linear) differential equations, even a lot of the algebraic correlations can't be solved analytically. These will need to be solved numerically (like x + ln(x) = 0 ..) A lot of them are empirical equations themselves, meaning that the equations are not ...


10

The equations, if they exist, are often rather non-linear and not enjoyable to calculate on the fly. I do not have an equation for the RPM at a given pressure altitude for a Cessna 162, but if I may use a different equation as a concrete example: pressure correction for given altitude: $$P(h)=P_0 e^{-\frac{Mg}{RT}h}$$ That equation is the Barometic formula. ...


12

For most of the information in those charts there is not a single formula which would cover all aspects. The graphical way is the simplest and has other advantages, too: With a formula it is easy to use a wrong number without noticing. On the graph you see where neighbouring values lead to so you can easily check whether your result is reasonably correct. ...


24

I was in the technical publishing business (flight and maintenance manuals) in another life. Tables are used as an alternative to graphical plot presentations in flight manuals, and make it a little easier to access information, say, just sitting with the book in your lap. With the graphical plot, you have to unfold the sheet and have it laid out flat so ...


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