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1

The answers you have been given accurately describe why a historical flight's track may have discontinuities or errors. Those answers apply to any flight tracking website which depends on ADS-B or multilateration technology to determine an aircraft's location. But to answer your specific question about live flights displayed on FlightRadar24: I've noticed ...


1

Either there is a published procedure to follow (usual for controlled airspace) and there will be either company procedures and/or aircraft type specific procedures to follow. What exactly the crew will do depends on the combination of those. Raise gear (if applicable), apply power, raise flaps (as needed), raise nose (if needed to increase climb rate), and ...


1

You ask: Is it bad form to call "ready to depart" when you know you won't be cleared yet? Speaking as a controller, my answer is emphatically: Yes, this is bad form. Do not do it. When you call ready for departure (and please do say "departure" rather than "takeoff" in all radio calls except reading back "cleared for ...


4

Aircraft on an instrument flight rules flight plan have received a clearance to fly to a specific point and no further; this is called their clearance limit. These days the destination airport is usually the first and only clearance limit for a flight, but this is not necessarily so; an aircraft may be cleared to a certain radionavigation aid or set of ...


12

Depending on which country you're flying in, the specific approach may or may not have a defined missed approach procedure. If the plane is flying a visual approach, then you're most likely not going to have a procedure to use when going around. The generally accepted technique is to either fly the runway heading and climb to a safe altitude, or enter the ...


12

Anytime an IFR aircraft, on an IFR approach, does a go-around, there is a published missed approach that must be followed. (In some jurisdictions an IFR aircraft can be given a Visual Approach clearance and the published missed approach would no longer be valid in the case of a go-around during a Visual Approach). The published IFR missed approach procedure ...


2

This method of flying a triangle pattern to alert air traffic control, or in this case air defence radar control, in case of radio failure, is depicted in the 1955 short film "24 Hour Alert", starring Jack Webb of "Dragnet" fame. Some nice shots of what appears to be March AFB at the time, and F-86Ds and a T-33 in flight.


36

In general, the minimum vertical distance two IFR aircraft can be (if they are not separated laterally) is 1,000 feet. This allows for inaccuracies, for example due to: altimeter error instrumentation imprecision pilot imprecision turbulence aircraft height (compare a Skyhawk, nine feet tall, with an A380, 79 feet tall) while still making sure aircraft do ...


14

This answer is specifically for the US-- Above 3000' AGL and below 18000' MSL (which is not the same thing as FL 180)1, cruising VFR traffic flies at MSL altitudes which are "round" numbers plus 500' (e.g. 3500' MSL, 4500' MSL, 5500' MSL, etc) while cruising IFR traffic flies at MSL altitudes which are "round" numbers (e.g. 4000' MSL, ...


2

Do they simply announce "flight of xxx 10 mi east with W for full stop" and get successive landing clearances, or do they all break apart before getting close to the airport? It is up to the pilots. As aeroalias said, formation flights are considered a single aircraft and are controlled as such (although there is additional separation added: ...


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