New answers tagged

4

So the problem is that cruising altitudes are assigned based on heading E or W. If the desired track is within a few degrees of north or south, the heading needed to maintain the track could 'straddle' north or south. With some tracks/wind combinations two aircraft flying the identical route at different airspeeds could fall into opposite hemispheres. ...


1

A transition is a branch of a Standard Terminal Arrival Route (STAR) or a Standard Instrument Departure (SID). ACO is the identifier for the Akron VOR/DME, which is a a navaid. It’s not surprising then that you would hear of an ACO transition for both KCAK and KCLE. I would provide a chart showing where these are, but I can’t find any plates for the older ...


18

Wasabi's answer is not correct, or at least not fully correct. You actually ask two questions: does a military controller need to take additional tests and training to get hired, and do they need additional training to work as a civilian controller. The answers, respectively, are "no" and "yes." The hiring practices change every so often, ...


2

No. A US military air traffic controller does not need additional testing nor training to become a civilian air traffic controller. This is because the testing and training for military Air traffic controllers follow the same basics as civilian air traffic controller testing and training, but with additional requirements, training, and testing to fit the ...


7

No. /X (VOR only), /D (VOR/DME only), /Y (LORAN only), and /M (TACAN only) aircraft do not have transponders. Primary-only aircraft can be assigned flight plans, and fly IFR. It's not common, though, because aircraft that will fly within 30 miles of class B airspace, or aircraft that will operate above 10,000 feet MSL are required to be equipped with ...


3

In a long-ago occurrence, a controller and friend of mine was working a mid-shift at my facility, when a VFR aircraft encountered IFR conditions. The controller was the "brusque" type, but was absolutely professional on the frequency, and handled the situation in a fine manner. Trouble was, on the mids, we used handsets instead of headsets. With a ...


4

Short answer - YES. Long answer - Back in about 1995, I was working the airspace around eastern Wyoming and western Nebraska, when Casper FSS (located at Casper, back then) called me about a lost aircraft on their frequency. After a couple of minutes of sorting out reversed position reports (pilot was giving the wrong radial from the NAVAID), I established ...


1

For any ARTCC you can contact their Airspace and Procedures office. Be polite, and specific. They will have that information. It should be publicly available. The cities for the lower 48 where ARTCCs are (associated city name and actual location) Albuquerque (NE side of town) 505-856-4500 Atlanta (Hampton GA you should hear it when the speedway fires up) 770-...


2

I have had, at one time, 55 aircraft on my frequency, due to weather in Colorado, Kansas, and Wyoming forcing the early morning (5 AM local in Denver) eastbound rush over ONL VORTAC. Fortunately, controllers in other areas feeding my sector were looking out for me, and didn't send me any surprises. Thanks, guys. Once I hit that peak, the push was pretty much ...


2

In the US, the ARTCC where the incident occurs acts as the focal point for search and rescue operations. They work directly with the US Air Force Rescue Coordination Center, local, state, and Federal law enforcement (if necessary), and the Civil Air Patrol during search operations.


5

In the center environment, when sectors within a given area of responsibility are slow, they can be combined so a radar team can work a larger proportion of the airspace. Controllers who are not working traffic may be on break, or they may be assigned other duties, such as reading up on new procedures, letters of agreement, general aviation notices, and the ...


5

In the US, there has been an ongoing effort to accomplish accommodating direct routes as much as possible since the Free Flight initiative in 2000, and the National Preferred Route plan, beginning in 2008. There are inherent problems with any such plan. Here are the trickiest ones - Major airports must have a usable plan for flowing traffic to and from the ...


6

Here's the history, at least for the US. When I hired on, way back in 1985, the FAA had printers based on IBM Selectric mechanisms. They had a two-color ribbon, red and black, and a typeball with capital letters in two sizes, plus a few special symbols. When a strip was printed, color could be selected by the computer for certain items. Callsigns on ...


2

The closest thing I could find was MVA and MIA Charts from FAA web site. The data format is in AIXM (XML) but I am not sure if this will cover you as I haven't tried reading any of the AIXM files. By looking into the PDF that provides the "cartoon-y" preview, it seems that the data are only that: MVA and MIA. If you need anything more than that, ...


1

When KRCA was a B52 base, it was quite common for those aircraft to drop aluminum chaff (think BIG pieces of tinsel) as part of their training. It would spread out very quickly, and you'd see hundreds of strong primary targets in the area of the drop. They'd hang there for a long time, following the wind. Quite annoying, especially if you had a non-...


2

You don't have to do anything. Your flightplan does not contain an ETA, and one is not calculated until you actually depart. You've only filed an estimated time of departure (ETD) and estimated elapsed time (EET). When you depart and open your flightplan, a DEP message is sent to the reporting office responsible for alerting service at your destination ...


10

Context: FAA. Altitude change Very common request. The pilot simply makes the request, and the controller issues the climb or descent after checking to make sure the altitude is clear. The controller then updates the aircraft's flight plan so the next controller down the line knows about the new altitude. If the aircraft is not within the control of the ...


11

Anything and everything (well, maybe not the aircraft type...). A flightplan is just that - a plan. The pilot's intentions can change during flight for any number of reasons. Just inform ATC of your new intentions, request a new clearance as appropriate, and ATC will accommodate the request if possible. Happens all the time.


1

The Mode C Altitude being displayed on ATC's radar can be used for separation purposes if it is within 300 feet of the pilot's reported altitude as the OPs question points out. Important, however, is the understanding that the actual maximum altimeter error allowed during FAR Part 43 testing and checking (with respect to the Mode C readout versus the actual ...


6

A Stall horn will tell you, you are (close to) no longer flying, but actually falling. Since this is of paramount importance for every airplane, it will sound until recovery is completed. Often it is only the silencing of the stall horn that can give a pilot certainty about that. Sometimes even this is ignored, because pilots treat it as just as alarming as ...


19

Things may be different for small airplanes, but for the transport-category, i.e. Part 25 certification, your concern is taken into account:* (d) The alert function must be designed to minimize the effects of false and nuisance alerts. In particular, it must be designed to: ... (2) Provide a means to suppress an attention-getting component of an alert ...


40

A stall condition needs to be handled now, and once it's handled, the alarm will go away. What you don't want to happen is you are in an approaching stall condition, the pilot hits a "silence" button while the situation gets worse without the plane telling them. An emergency is "AVIATE, NAVIGATE, COMMUNICATE" in that order. Fly the plane ...


2

iFACTS is a product that has been in use for almost 10 years in UK ATC. It will predict 18 minutes ahead (in UK airspace as this is the longest time a flight would require to get through the longest sector. This is configurable) for every flight of interest and do conflict detection for all flights of interest (with appropriate filtering rules depending on ...


15

Yes, there are several ways for the controller to predict the trajectory of a flight. The closer the flight gets, the more precise the predictions also get. It all begins with a flightplan. Prior to departure, a flightplan will have been sent to all ATC units expected to be involved with handling the flight. This includes an estimated time of departure (EOBT)...


4

As early as the mid 1970's broadband radar (older style "raw" radar) was being replaced by computer generated targets (in Air Route Traffic Control Centers -ARTCCs) and data tags and more sophisticated tracked traffic technology was becoming available. Along with this new technology came features that allowed the controller (using a rotatable ...


3

The post When is 'heavy' used in callsign? shows that the usage of "Heavy" depends on the country. The general ICAO usage is to say "Heavy" only in the initial message with a frequency. That usage applies to France, where the linked CVR transcipt took place (no differences are listed in the French AIP). Since that transcript does ...


4

There are a handful of towers still in Class E/G airspace. They're rare, but they do exist and are something to watch out for during preflight planning. As of April 2021, here's the airports I know of: KJYO - Leesburg, VA KPCA - Picacho ARNG, AZ KTNX - Tonopah Test Range, NV (inside restricted airspace) I wouldn't be surprised if there's others I missed, ...


7

In the Pilot/Controller Glossary, this is the definition of "Chaff" and would be its meaning in the context of "Additional Services" referenced in your question. CHAFF- Thin, narrow metallic reflectors of various lengths and frequency responses, used to reflect radar energy. These reflectors, when dropped from aircraft and allowed to ...


5

I've played atc-sim for fun myself some time ago, and it can be a nice way to pass time. However, in terms of realism, it only simulates a very narrow range of the tasks real controllers have to do. It gives you a (very basic) idea of what vectoring is like, and that's it. I'd say probably about 5% of what a real controller has to do is simulated, and given ...


13

As Digital Dracula says, it's just a game. The best way to experience something approaching the real deal is to join the VATSIM community. It's a virtual ATC system that integrates flight simulator players in a live dynamic ATC environment. It's much closer to the real thing because it's real people, some of whom are real controllers, and you can play it as ...


13

Not very realistic. it's text-based; no readbacks. there are no approach clearances. You can assign speed, altitudes, and headings, but there is no way to instruct an aircraft to execute a specific approach. there aren't, really, any missed approaches or go arounds no emergencies Basically, it' just a game of "keep the aircraft separated", but it ...


2

Yes, there is a tower in G (with E above), you just can't fly there Surface-level controlled (alphabet) airspace isn't allowed to overlap special-use (R-area) airspace, as can be noted from the situation at Creech AFB. This means that the tower (Silverbow Tower) at Tonopah Test Range (KTNX) isn't in controlled airspace as the airport is within the bounds of ...


1

There is nothing specific to operating a military jet or any other type of aircraft. If you are in class E or G airspace, you can fly VFR and do whatever maneuvers you want without even talking to ATC, though you are still required to see and avoid other traffic. This is generally how student pilots practice their maneuvers, though much lower and slower ...


3

At areas where a local increase in traffic density occurs, a temporary tower may be installed. This may be at an uncontrolled airport which may be in class E, or even Class G airspace. By definition, whereas class G is uncontrolled airspace, adding a control tower does require a Notice to Airmen alerting to the change in airspace and the requirement of the ...


-1

The simple answer is that you don't get your own block of airspace to do aerobatics in your private turbojet. You could fly into a military operations area, but even if authorized to use that airspace (and some private owners are) for that purpose, anyone flying VFR may transit that airspace without talking to a soul...which means you don't own it. You just ...


5

As @jamessqf points out, once the aircraft is no longer owned by the government1 there wouldn't be any regulatory difference between you requesting air work and, say, a Gulfstream acceptance or post-maintenance flight that needs to fly around at odd altitudes and attitudes to check out various systems. That said... Below FL180 you can fly VFR as you like. Of ...


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