New answers tagged

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Yes, if you are receiving radar services you must comply with ATC instructions. And contrary to voretaq's otherwise excellent answer, simply electing to terminate radar services so as to avoid those instructions or restrictions is not necessarily an option. There are two reasons for this, one legal and one practical. Legal answer Let's look at 14 CFR 91.123 ...


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US weather forecasts generated by the National Weather Service are generated by a supercomputer running the US weather model in DC. That forecast is sent to National Weather Service stations across the country and compared with local observations. Corrections are fed back into the model for the next forecast. The NWS also releases radiosonde balloons to ...


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The fighters may have the the guard frequency painted on them, as in this photo: (source and more photos) But as others have said, the likelihood of a person Knowing how to tune an aviation radio, Recognizing what "STBY 121.50" means, and Not knowing in the first place that 121.5 is the guard frequency seems vanishingly small. Besides, unless ...


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I was taught the following rule of thumb for providing a final vector to final, in the USA, using the STARS radar system which (when using ADS-B inputs) has a one-second update time: Set the Predicted Track Line to 30 seconds. Vector the aircraft to a 90º base-to-final. When the PTL reaches the extended runway final, issue the Position-Turn-Altitude-...


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If you only give them a direction of flight, Clearance Delivery will give you a “local” squawk code, and Departure will usually terminate radar services as soon as you exit their class B/C airspace. If departing a class D airport, you don’t need a departure clearance, and they won’t give you a code at all. If you give them a specific destination, they will ...


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There are a few considerations here that the previous answers have each touched on. I'll consolidate and expand. First of all when I (a controller at a Class C airport) hear "flight following" I take that to mean you want to receive traffic advisories from ATC all the way to your destination airport/area. At a Class C we give every departure a ...


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Mode A/C Transponders were originally implemented because the best you could get from skin reflection radar was a slant range altitude that wasn't very accurate. The altitude that a mode A/C transponder transmits with when swept by a Secondary Surveillance Radar or that a Mode S transponder autonomously squits (transmits every 1/4 sec) is pressure altitude. ...


3

As Farhan says, peacetime (or non-combat-zone) military traffic may be controlled by civil or military ATC using the same or similar rules as for civil traffic. Military flights might operate in formation (standard or nonstandard) just as civil flights might. Military flights might also operate under Military Assumes Responsibility for Separation of Aircraft ...


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I'm no expert, but from what I gather the transponder has a direct connection to the altimeter pre-Kollsman window. Not sure how that's possible but it's something along those lines. Essentially the transponder reports your flight level to ATC no matter what— it always reports your altitude assuming an altimeter setting of 29.92. Then the radar system on the ...


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Air Traffic Control primarily provides aircraft separation services to aircraft operating under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). In US airspace, aircraft operating in US airspace under Visual Flight Rules (VFR), flying in and out of un-towered airports are not necessarily required to identify themselves to ATC. VFR traffic does not receive ATC separation ...


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There are various safety events that must be reported by controllers. Some of these may be reported only via the Air Traffic Safety Action Program (ATSAP) (the controller's version of ASAP and ASRS), while some must be reported as a Mandatory Occurrence Report on the facility's daily log. Some examples are: Loss of airborne separation, loss of runway ...


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It is not likely due to meteorological conditions affecting the physics of the radio waves (as others have mentioned the difference between the top and bottom of the aviation band is not very large, and ATC has no easy way of tuning a frequency on the radio). In the center environment I am not sure why a certain area would be on one frequency one day and ...


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In the interest of completeness... expeditedescent's answer correctly describes the effects of the flight-plan closure system. But at least in the USA, the actual mechanics are different. I had confusion about this as well. The terminology used (by the FAA and others) is that controllers will close a flight plan "automatically" if the aircraft ...


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In the United States, the FAA's Aeronautical Information Manual, section 4–2 "Radio Communications Phraseology and Techniques," states the following (emphasis in original): 4–2–3 a Initial Contact. The terms initial contact or initial callup means the first radio call you make to a given facility or the first call to a different controller or FSS ...


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As an FAA controller in the Terminal specialty (i.e. not an ARTCC controller) in the Lower 48: NO. No no no. No no no no no no no no no. NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO You're a pilot in the USA. We're controllers in the USA. We don't need the Kilo. We don't want the Kilo. The Kilo is extraneous information that no one cares about when you're talking on the ...


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I do not know the answers to most of your question. I suspect that Pondlife is correct that none of the values are sanity-checked (e.g. filing FL300 in a Skylane, or filing Tango/Q-routes as /A) with the possible exception of looking for a proper equipment code if you file for RVSM airspace. Even that I'm doubtful of. But there are "preferential routes&...


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The actual operation of a crop duster airplane will almost invariably happen in uncontrolled airspace. In the US, controlled airspace does not start until 700, 1200, or in a very few select areas 14,500 feet above ground level; below that the airspace is Class G, uncontrolled. Crop dusters operate at a few hundred feet above ground level or lower (a quick ...


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My speculation on what happened is: The first controller was in training and the second controller was their trainer. The trainee cleared you into the Class B but the trainer though that was a bad idea (perhaps there was traffic nearby they couldn't have kept you away from, or they wanted to teach you a lesson about calling too late, or they thought their ...


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Yes, such a system would be beneficial to pilots, ATC, and meteorologists. Pilots are very concerned with meteorological phenomena like icing and turbulence (for safety-of-flight reasons) and winds aloft (for fuel planning purposes). Pilot reports of weather conditions (PIREPs) may be delivered to ATC or Flight Service for local and long-range dissemination. ...


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To my ear as a controller in the United States, "flight following" implies a desire to remain in contact with ATC for the purpose of receiving traffic advisories on a cross-country flight to a specific destination airport. Any other term ("traffic advisories" or "radar advisories" or similar) implies not that, e.g. traffic ...


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The simple answer is, usually the altimeter setting does not change fast enough for it to be an issue. Near ground level, one-hundredth of an inch of mercury (00.01 inHg) corresponds to roughly ten feet of pressure altitude. Thus one inch of mercury corresponds to one thousand feet of altitude. (This rough rule of thumb can be seen by looking at a lowest-...


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As a controller, though at a very sleepy airport: In the first situation, I do not expect you to delay turning base simply because you do not have a landing clearance. I expect you to fly a normal traffic pattern and maybe prompt me with a "turning base" call if I've forgotten to clear you. In the second situation I would expect you to continue ...


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In my limited experience (MOAs only) the controlling agency—the center, usually, but could be an approach facility—will be the final in-the-moment arbiter of whether the using agency—the military—is allowed to actually take the airspace and make it hot, regardless of any prior coordination or NOTAM. If there is IFR traffic within the area they will not ...


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I concur with casey's answer on the linked question. There are two basic facts: The FARs say what a pilot can or cannot do. The FARs say a pilot must comply with an ATC instruction. And then a complication: ATC might instruct a pilot to do something specifically disallowed by the FARs (for example, exceed 250 KIAS below 10000 MSL). Really what it comes ...


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That would be acceptable to me, but probably more information than you need to give. If you have a transponder, we'll give you a squawk code (and perhaps ask for an ident as well) and radar identify you that way. We will then call "radar contact" and advise where we think you are ("two-eight miles northwest of Podunk VOR"). If you don't ...


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Necro-ing this question to give a more forceful opinion of "OP was not wrong." First, like GreenAsJade said, tower didn't yell at you in the moment. This is not incontrovertible evidence of legality or correctness, but it's a pretty strong piece of evidence. More importantly, "report three miles out" is not a standard pattern entry. Here ...


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The answers here are correct. Just adding my perspective as a controller. Runway hold short instructions. This is a required readback item. Super-high priority. We need to hear three things in one single transmission: "Hold short," the runway number, and your callsign. All three. In one transmission. We need it. Runway assignment. This isn't ...


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Any US radar facility can (and will, workload and coverage permitting) provide VFR Flight Following, whether Approach/Departure or Center. Look up the airport you are departing or, if already airborne, the nearest airport in your general direction of flight in your A/FD, EFB or (if you’re lucky) glass panel. The App/Dep lines will give you the frequency and ...


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I have never called up Center for Flight Following, but I have certainly been passed to Center for Flight Following. I would imagine if they "accept" you from a Departure controller, then they would accept you from a radio call. That being said, like all things related to Flight Following, it is controller workload permitted.


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To answer you first question, yes you can call center. I have heard of people doing that before. However center is generally for IFR aircraft so it may not always be the best idea. I also checked the Pilot/Controller Glossary and it backs that up. It says "AIR ROUTE TRAFFIC CONTROL CENTER− A facility established to provide air traffic control service to ...


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