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1

Be sure to verify that the airport in question specifically has a "Class E Surface Area". This will be denoted by a dashed line encircling the airport on the sectional map - like a Class D in magenta instead of blue. Typical Class E airports will only be surrounded by a magenta gradient designating transition area and the Class E airspace only ...


4

By default, all controlled airspace (class E and up) is owned by an ARTCC. In many areas, they delegate airspace (including class E!) to other ATC facilities, either a TRACON or a Tower. Unfortunately, that info isn't on Sectional or Terminal Charts; you have to look in the Chart Supplement (formerly Airport/Facility Directory). For KGFL, we see: ARTCC: ...


-1

Does your radiosonde have an ADS-B transponder in it? If so, then ATC and aircraft can get location and speed information from it without any other communication links.


1

Aircraft and ATC get "weather products" in various formats via communications systems that are standardized worldwide. National authorities build these products (or don't, in some areas) based on thousands of different data points collected over a large area. You can see examples of these products at the US National Weather Service's Aviation ...


2

No, neither ATC nor aircraft receive any information directly from a radiosonde balloon. However, in many cases the meteorological agency operating the radiosondes does use them to produce forecasts that are made available to ATC and pilots.


1

It is possible- which is a strategy that is commonly thought of in conjunction with space tourism. You can not only start a plane in air using another airplane but also start a hybrid rocket from an airplane in air. For that look up SpaceShipOne and its carrier aircraft.


3

At least in the US, this is perfectly legal. There have been quite a few such aircraft in history. However, an aircraft docking and undocking from another is so rare that there's no standard way of communicating it with ATC. So you'd have to explain what you're doing in plain language. (And then you'd have to explain it again when the confused controller ...


6

Absent an explicit instruction to the contrary, VFR traffic can do whatever it wants in class C/D/E airspace. ATC is not supposed to give you both lateral and vertical control instructions at the same time because that could interfere with your ability to maintain VFR cloud clearance requirements. Class B has different cloud clearance, so you will almost ...


0

In JO 7110.65, 4−2−5. ROUTE OR ALTITUDE AMENDMENTS. b. When route or altitude in a previously issued clearance is amended, restate all applicable altitude restrictions. The example given: “Amend altitude. Cross Ollis intersection at or above Three Thousand; cross Gordonsville V−O−R at or above One Two Thousand; maintain Flight Level Two Four Zero.” (...


1

The restriction to cross "BHAWK at FL240" is overridden by the controllers latest clearance to "Descend Via FYTTE5 arrival", unless they include the instruction descend via "EXCEPT MAINTAIN FL240". FAA Climb Via/Descend Via Speed Clearances Frequently Asked Questions, page 6, questions 8. If unsure, you should query ATC though....


45

Every US controller I've ever heard from says they'd prefer to be talking to every aircraft in their airspace, period. This lets them know your intentions and allows them to move you around if needed, which saves them far more time than it costs giving you traffic advisories. If you don't have a transponder, they can still tag your primary target with your ...


23

They'd rather talk to you, even if they can't do much for you. If you report over XYZ at 4500 heading east, they can correlate that to a primary target & note that it's N1234S "over there". They may have to call you again if traffic is heading your way at 7,500' to confirm your altitude, but unless they're busy, that's no big deal. And if the targets are ...


-1

This depends on the specific Air Traffic Navigation Service (ATNS) provider providing services and the equipment the controllers are equipped with. US-based FAA controllers actually are mostly unaware of which types of surveillance data are currently contributing to the position the system is plotting aircraft on their displays or scopes. While they have ...


5

I have flown aircraft with Augmented Enhanced Reality built into their PFDs. They represent a desired flight path on the PFD with a rectangle whose unit of measure is dependent on the phase of flight. For example purposes, you would see a box on the PFD roughly 200 feet high by half a mile wide with 1 to 5 miles between each box in the enroute phase of ...


0

In the military when flying multiple instrument approaches to the same runway for currency or training we would be vectored in a rectangular "box" pattern by ATC. For example, on the initial communication when asked how the approach will terminate, our response might be: "request the option, radar vectors box pattern, multiple ILS approaches." We would ...


2

Boxing vectors is not a standard term. I can't tell you exactly what was going through the mind of the pilot (you would have to ask them directly), but based on your description, my interpretation would be that the pilot was requesting delaying vectors to give them time to work checklists. It is pretty common in an emergency situation where the pilots need ...


3

Back in the late 80s I tried out for ATC in Toronto and took the initial screening test. I got an 88% score but missed the cut for the next evaluation stage because they were only taking people who scored over 90% to the next step (there were a lot of applicants). There were numerous evaluation steps. Education per se is quite irrelevant other than ...


3

As a general answer (not pertaining just to Canada): any aspiring air traffic controller is very thoroughly tested before acceptance to a training program. Having any kind of previous education has little effect, say, higher academic merits, in my experience, may only represent someone's ability to function in academia. Being a doctor of this or that ...


6

That plane was N557PG, a Cessna Citation V which is, according to the FAA, registered to National Aircraft Leasing Corp. That company is probably a front company for the FBI. Here's the track that N557PG flew on June 2, 2020. Compare to the image in your question: Here's a link to see that track yourself. Note that it is probably only good until July 2, ...


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