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2

So does it mean there are two separate phases to add fuel to airstream, first (compulsory) for the normal operation and the second (optional) for the afterburner? Yes. The key difference is that the regular burner is between the compressor and the turbine, but the afterburner is the last item at the back of the engine. That means that the regular burner has ...


8

The basic answer is yes. Fuel is burned in the main section to make thrust (and drive a fan in that kind of engine), and keep the compression/combustion cycle going, and to work properly (not melt itself), most of the air that got compressed by the compressor section is used to control the flame boundaries within the burner can and cool the engine. Maybe ...


26

The regular way to burn fuel is not to use an afterburner. The afterburner is an option added downstream of a regular engine to increase its thrust temporarily. It is an interesting alternative to fitting the aircraft with a larger engine. However the additional thrust it delivers is very expensive. The normal way to burn fuel involves a combustion chamber ...


13

Another NASA article shows you the diagram you need. You can see the two places fuel can be injected, before and after the turbine. As you say there are two separate phases to add fuel to airstream


4

The logical answer is that there were aircraft that required both low octane fuel and high octane fuel on board. You don't want to use high octane fuel in a low octane engine (unless you're forced to; the low octane engine can't scavenge the excess lead in the high octane fuel and it fouls plugs among other things) and vice versa (the high octane engine ...


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