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2

Short answer: pilots need flight visibility, ATC needs ground visibility. There are two different definitions of visibility in the regulations you mentioned: flight visibility and ground visibility. They're defined in 14 CFR 1.1: Flight visibility means the average forward horizontal distance, from the cockpit of an aircraft in flight, at which prominent ...


0

A more complete quoting of 14 CFR 91.155 as it pertains to this question would be: (d) Except as provided in § 91.157 of this part, no person may take off or land an aircraft, or enter the traffic pattern of an airport, under VFR, within the lateral boundaries of the surface areas of Class B, Class C, Class D, or Class E airspace designated for an airport ...


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J. Hougaard is correct. With Tower, Approach and Center, yes you can use waypoints in communications. Be prepared for them not to know immediately where a lesser used waypoint is. I have had Center not know where particular Class G airports in their jurisdiction were. Some know the names by heart, but not the airport codes. When it comes to communicating ...


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Yes you may, even if it is not so common. It can certainly make it easier for ATC to locate you quickly, especially if you are not so familiar with the local geography and VFR landmarks. Just remember that some IFR waypoints are used very rarely, so the controller might not immediately be sure of its position. So if you are near a common VFR reporting point, ...


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