39

The first thing that you should do is check the NOTAM's for the airport (which of course, you should do before you leave on your flight). Very often, these types of errors have been discovered by someone else and the FAA will have issued a NOTAM to let everyone know. In this case there is no NOTAM, so we would have had no reason to suspect an issue before ...


22

It's the fact the autopilot works more accurately than a pilot which is actually the cause of the restriction. The decision to restrict the use of the autopilot usually comes from the certification agency after the ILS inspection flight detected glideslope erratic variations or reversals. The false signals are likely due to interference from the environment ...


20

Assuming that you're asking about intercepting the glideslope from above rather than the localizer, the answer is that it is definitely NOT recommended. There are at least two significant problems if you do this. First, is the fact that at high vertical angles there can be false glideslopes. Looking at the diagram below, if you're coming at the glideslope ...


18

The correct thing to do very much depends on the clearance that you were given. If you were simply cleared direct to BEJCY and cleared for the approach, then your instructor is correct and you should have completed the procedure turn as charted. If the clearance included the words straight in (i.e. "cleared for the straight in GPS 01 approach"), then you ...


16

Read that other question again. He was approaching from the SSW and made an assumption based on the approach segment from AUGIE. He wasn't actually on the AUGIE-BEJCY leg as it would be impossible to be there if he were approaching from the SSW. His clearance was "Direct BEJCY cleared for the GPS 01 approach". That clearance, in lieu of any specific ...


15

TCAS 1 will only give a Traffic Advisory (TA). The crew will lookout for the other aircraft and take evasive action if necessary. They also may contact ATC for instructions. They will follow ATC instructions unless they see that the instructions will bring them into the path of the other aircraft. TCAS II will give a traffic advisory first, then a ...


15

You don't have to have permission to fly in IMC in uncontrolled, class G, airspace. However, you must have an instrument rating and be in an IFR-certified aircraft. In uncontrolled airspace, you may fly into IMC as you like and perform whatever maneuvers you want. It's a very good idea to get flight following in order to receive traffic warnings from ATC if ...


14

No arguments needed, it's very specifically defined. According to the FAA's Pilot/Controller Glossary under SEGMENTS OF AN INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE: c. Final Approach− The segment between the final approach fix or point and the runway, airport, or missed approach point. (See ICAO term FINAL APPROACH SEGMENT.) So it starts at the FAF, which is ...


13

The only minimums that apply to any approach are those printed on the plate. Doing anything else is being a test pilot. Minimums are charted based on obstacle clearance, descent gradient, distance from the airport, and a variety of other factors. The appropriate course of action is to either: land straight in on 31 and attempt to deal with the crosswind. ...


12

There are procedures with temperature restrictions, related to altitude constraints. An example is Innsbruck: The text in the red box says: Procedure N/A below AD temp -7° For effect of temperature on altimeter: How will the altimeter read in air colder than ISA?


12

The key is in the part of the procedure description I've highlighted: When local altimeter setting not received use Northeast Philadelphia altimeter setting -- you're using the altimeter setting for an airport 15 miles away. 15 miles may not seem like a lot of distance, but it's enough for there to be a notceable variation in altimeter settings. The FAA ...


12

If the aircraft has not established a stabilised approach, a go around is required. According to EUROCONTROL's Skybrary, a stabilised approach is defined as: Their Approach-and-landing Accident Reduction (ALAR) Briefing Note 7-1 suggests that "all flights must be stabilised by 1000 feet above airport elevation in IMC and 500 feet above airport elevation ...


12

I don't have any definitive information on why the oval shape was chosen. However, it seems to me to be the most practical shape given the navigational equipment available when holding patterns first became necessary. VOR, DME, and GPS technology did not exist. Holding patterns were flown, often by single pilots hand flying, with reference to an ADF needle, ...


11

The literal answer to your question about complying with the plate is also in AIM 5-4-9, right after the piece you quoted (my bold): NOTE- The pilot may elect to use the procedure turn or hold-in-lieu-of-PT when it is not required by the procedure, but must first receive an amended clearance from ATC. If the pilot is uncertain whether the ATC ...


11

I can't say for sure, but I would assume that the pattern-based drills were removed because of the new emphasis on scenario-based ("real world") training the FAA has been moving toward: While Pattern A and Pattern B are useful for honing your skills (and I'll even admit they're kind of fun to fly) they're not something you'll fly in the "real world" - you ...


11

Autoland exists at least in part because a pilot can't safely hit (the right part of) the runway (at the right speed and attitude) without visual references, so a lot of precision electronic guidance equipment is needed, and then even more equipment to ensure the first equipment is working correctly. In contrast, the sky is much bigger than the runway. It's ...


10

The FAA says (per 14 CFR 91.185): If the clearance limit is not a fix from which an approach begins, leave the clearance limit at the expect-further-clearance time if one has been received, or if none has been received, upon arrival over the clearance limit, and proceed to a fix from which an approach begins and commence descent or descent and ...


10

An appropriately installed GPS may be used until crossing the final approach fix on a non-localizer approach, and until the segment requiring navigation via the localizer on a LOC, ILS, SDF, or LDA approach. It's generally approved and legal at any other time. During the missed approach, a pilot may switch to GPS immediately, unless the missed approach ...


10

Answer is yes. FAA ATC Section 6. Vectoring: When vectoring or approving an aircraft to deviate off of a procedure that includes published altitude restrictions, advise the pilot if you intend on clearing the aircraft to resume the procedure. PHRASEOLOGY− FLY HEADING (degrees), MAINTAIN (altitude), EXPECT TO RESUME (SID, STAR, etc.). ...


10

I think it just means a situation in which the DME is "no longer locked on". Sounds like the DME may not be seen properly from those areas mentioned in the NOTAM. From the Naval Instrument Navigation Workbook TACAN Characteristics 1.Bearing/Distance Unlock. TACAN bearing and distance signals are subject to line-of-sight restrictions because of ...


10

The FAA's Instrument Procedures Handbook, Chapter 4 has a good explanation of this (emphasis mine): An airplane is certified in only one approach category, and although a faster approach may require higher category minimums to be used, an airplane cannot be flown to the minimums of a slower approach category. The certified approach category is ...


10

Yes. You can requests a local IFR, or quadrant clearance and then receive a clearance for a region, such as: CLEARED TO FLY (general direction from NAVAID) OF (NAVAID name and type) BETWEEN (specified) COURSES TO/BEARINGS FROM/RADIALS (NAVAID name when a NDB) WITHIN (number of miles) MILE RADIUS, And an example: “Cleared to fly east ...


9

The Super Hornet can't even shoot a VOR approach, much less an ILS. We are TACAN/ PAR only. That's fine at the boat, because that's how we operate, but apparently the Navy still hasn't figured out that there are stationary airfields that don't float. Maybe someday we'll upgrade and get the finest in 1980's technology. In all seriousness I'm assuming it ...


9

For go-around, several things have to be done in the moment the decision is taken: Apply full power (obviously), disconnect autopilot glide-slope mode, disarm spoilers and retract them if they are extended, disarm autobrakes and in some aircraft reduce flaps. Modern airliners, and some smaller aircraft, have a method for doing all of these at once via the ...


9

Unless you were "cleared straight-in" for the approach, when IMOMY is your IAF (as it was in this case) you are required to fly the course reversal, even if you can execute a direct entry. This is because the approach does not have terminal arrival areas labeled NoPT. So, yes, it was appropriate to fly the 6nm reversal. That said, no, you cannot choose a ...


9

One you are established inbound on the VOR radial note the heading you are flying to maintain that course. The difference between that and the radial is your wind correction angle. Multiply it by 3 and apply it to the outbound course heading. To do this you don't need to know anything about the wind. You just need to be able to intercept and track the ...


9

Listen to the identifier... That will tell you if you have the 10R I-MRY or the 28L I-MTB ils. Some runways use the same frequency like this, while others use different frequencies for opposite direction ILS's. The identifier will always be unique, though. The 10R transmitter doesn't operate at the same time as the 28L transmitter. One transmits "this" ...


9

It's defined in the pilot/controller glossary: VISUAL CLIMB OVER AIRPORT (VCOA)− A departure option for an IFR aircraft, operating in visual meteorological conditions equal to or greater than the specified visibility and ceiling, to visually conduct climbing turns over the airport to the published “climb−to” altitude from which to proceed with the ...


9

An IFR holding pattern is along some bearing (typically, a VOR radial). By flying a racetrack pattern, the plane is flying inbound on the radial for a period of time (straight line), making a standard turn (semi-circle), flying outbound on the same heading, slightly offset from the radial (straight line again), and making another standard turn to come ...


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