45

Apparently you aren't the only person who wondered this; the FAA actually has it in an FAQ: What is the significance of a runway 8069 feet in length and why are two different aerodrome symbols used to depict hard surface runways on Sectional charts? For purposes of airport depiction, specialists represent a runway between 7970 and 8069 feet in ...


34

Unless it's an obsoleted procedure chart, it usually means that it's not complete. The example you show has only the features pertinent to that approach, and its missing (for clarity) the features needed for any other aviation in that area. You must use a sufficiently complete chart for navigation; the approach diagram is supplementary to your navigation ...


32

From FAA INFO 15002: A [snowflake] -XX°C icon will be incrementally added to airport approach plates, beginning Mar 5, 2015. The icon indicates a cold temperature altitude correction will be required on an approach when the reported temperature is, “at or below” the temperature specified for that airport. This looks to be a work-in-progress, as they ...


28

When an aviation chart is marked with "DO NOT USE FOR NAVIGATION", it means that ... umm ... it should not be used for navigation. The question is why it should not be, because it appears that the chart/map is very accurate and hence it is thought that it can provide details for navigation. There are several reasons: A newer version might be available and ...


27

The FAA chart user's guide says: Hard-surfaced runways greater than 8069' or some multiple runways less than 8069' It's the latter case of some multiple runways less than 8069'. This is also confirmed in the post, "What is significant about the number 8069 ft?" Specialists also place these polygons around the runway pattern of aerodromes with ...


26

MERMA is an aviation waypoint Waypoints used in aviation are given five-letter names. These names are meant to be pronounceable or have a mnemonic value, so that they may easily be conveyed by voice. According to this page back before the FAA decided all waypoints must have 5 character names, this waypoint - being out in the ocean - was called "Mermaid" ...


23

They are named holding points; this allows them to say things like "taxi to RABIT" rather than "taxiway Bravo, hold short of taxiway Charlie". This saves a lot of time for ground controllers at busy, complicated airports.


21

It means that the airspace around the airport is still under review after a proposed change. This article explains it in more detail: http://expertaviator.com/2012/07/31/what-is-an-objectionable-airport/ And here's the official text: Part 157 §157.7 FAA determinations. (a) The FAA will conduct an aeronautical study of an airport proposal and, after ...


18

Isn't it supposed that an airway has always the same magnetic course between navaids? No. The course depends on where you plot it from. That's a random RNAV airway I picked, it has two headings, 114° and 298°, and the difference is not 180°, it's 184°, so over the course of 112 nm there is a 4° shift. That's due to the curvature of the Earth. Consider ...


17

That is the elevation and length of the longest co-located water runway. Elevation of 00, and runway length 5000 feet. This information is found on page 16 in the current Aeronautical Chart Users Guide, which states: Runway length is shown to the nearest 100', using 70 as the rounding point; a runway 8070' in length is charted as 81, while a runway ...


17

A point shown in parentheses like this is called a Computer Navigation Fix (CNF). If it didn't fall right at the end of the runway, it would be marked with a small X. It's defined in the legend on page 39 (page 41 of the PDF) of the Terminal Procedure Publication User's Guide. These points are only used to define the navigation track in the flight computer. ...


15

In April 2013, the FAA's Charting Group met to discuss this question. The standard pattern used to be 800 ft AGL, and the Chart Supplement (formerly called Airport/Facility Directory or A/FD) was inconsistent in listing them. Ultimately they decided: Chris Criswell, AJV-22, reported that, per ACF recommendation, all traffic pattern altitudes, standard ...


14

You're confusing the airspace height with airspace altitude. The definition of Class C (in the US) is 3-2-4 (a) Generally, that airspace from the surface to 4,000 feet above the airport elevation (charted in MSL) If you look at chart for the Class C for Colorado Springs (elevation 6,187), the surface area of the airspace goes up to 10,200 ft MSL, ...


14

The boundaries are defined more precisely than the chart can show. What you see on the chart is a visual representation of the text published in JO 7400.9Z (or the most recent version of it): AWP AZ C Tucson, Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ Tucson, Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ (lat. 32°09'59"N., long. 110°52'59"W.) Tucson International Airport, AZ (lat. 32°06'58"...


13

It's not a printing error. FAA sectional charts are updated only once every six months. In order to to reduce the number of NOTAMs due to sectional changes (which can number in the hundreds between cycles), the FAA provides a section in the Airport Facility Directory (AFD), titled "Aeronautical Chart Bulletin" that identifies changes that have occurred since ...


13

According to the FAA Aeronautical Navigation Products FAQ: What does "OBJECTIONABLE" stand for on VFR Charts? "OBJECTIONABLE" indicates an airspace determination per FAA Joint Order 7400.2J Section 4, Airport Charting and Publication of Airport Data, issued 9 FEB 2012. When you see this indication on a chart be sure to refer to the applicable ...


13

Those lines denote areas of the MOA which have altitude exclusions different from what is listed on the chart's MOA table. In this case: MOA Excludes Airspace 3000' AGL & Below Notice the same style magenta lines are drawn in circles around airports in the MOA which also have the same style remark excluding a specific portion of the airspace.


13

Eurocontrol has an online repository of European Aeronatical Information Services. You'll need to register, but the basic service is free. By default, the application is JAVA applet based, which works not in the best way. After logging on, you can change the default behaviour to HTML based, which makes it more user friendly. Then clicking "Enter ...


13

From page 5-1-7, contractions in the AIM: RVRT . . . . . . . . . RVR Touchdown The full list is: RVR . . . . . . . . . . Runway Visual Range RVRM . . . . . . . . RVR Midpoint RVRR . . . . . . . . . RVR Rollout RVRT . . . . . . . . . RVR Touchdown On some runways there are multiple RVR sensors and different points along the runway, and these ...


13

Short answer: only part of the airway is unusable, and even then it's usable with GPS. Your image shows V522 between FAILS intersection and the ERI VOR but you have to look at the full airway, which runs from the DJB VOR in the south-west to MYPAL intersection in the north-east: As you can see, only some parts of it are marked unusable, even if they're ...


13

In the 1990s I flew for two 747 carriers, the first primarily a freight carrier and the second primarily a passenger carrier. Both used Jeppesen for their airway manuals, and both supplied each pilot with a single, full-size and very full Jepp manual that contained as many as possible of the airports we might go into. Image below: As I remember, the ...


12

That's part of the High Altitude Redesign (HAR) program. As far as the available information, it's now available for flights above FL390, and only in certain ARTCC's in the U.S. The waypoint naming convention is as follows: There are plans to have this system implemented worldwide. The pilot will no longer be limited by airways based on ground navaids. I....


12

ABND, according to the United States of America Aeronautical Contractions means: Abandon A link to this document can be found here: FAA Website


11

Take a look at the National Flight Data Center. The data appears to be contained in NASR. I mentioned in my comment that there may be no official source for spatial data, but I think this may include what you are looking for. These are derived products. The cannonical definitions are the legal descriptions found in FAA Orders with the prefix 7400. At the ...


11

It indicates a "temperature restricted" airport where precautions are required to calculate and set correct altimeter settings because the errors caused when the temperature is at the lowest recorded , if not corrected, can exceed the required obstacle clearance shown on the chart. Since the air is significantly more dense than the "ISA standard day", the ...


11

From the AIM, 4-3-6 (c)(2): All 14 CFR Part 139 airports report declared distances for each runway. Other airports may also report declared distances for a runway if necessary to meet runway design standards or to indicate the presence of a clearway or stopway. Where reported, declared distances for each runway end are published in the Airport/Facility ...


11

To add a little to @abelenky's answer, you'll notice that each area has a identifier in it: SBR-522, SBP-505 etc. Those identifiers are made up of the ICAO country prefix, the airspace type, and a unique code. The airspace type can be Prohibited (P), Restricted (R) or Danger (D). Since SB is the ICAO code for Brazil, SBR-522 is Brazil Restricted area #522; ...


11

From the FAA's Chart Users' Guide: AeroNav Products’ charts are prepared in accordance with specifications of the Interagency Air Cartographic Committee (IACC) and are approved by representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Department of Defense (DoD). Book 2 of the IACC Specifications covers Sectionals and VFR Terminal ...


11

It's an intersection, as described in the FAA Aeronautical Chart User's Guide (VFR Sectional & TAC section): Named intersections used as reporting points. Arrows are directed toward facilities which establish intersection. If you follow the arrows that make up the MERMA intersection symbol, it's defined by the intersection of radial 246 from the ...


11

What you want is the Frontmatter to the Terminal Procedures Publication, and in particular the pages under "Approach Lighting System" -- these document all the various permutations of visual approach aids found in the US NAS. As to the symbols you are specifically asking about -- the "shell" is the standard symbol for an ODALS (OmniDirectional Approach ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible