24

If you look at satellite imagery it looks like you have very high terrain to the west of the runway. The water would be the primary area available for a climb back to obstacle clearance altitude. Looks like the MAP just routes you with sufficient time to climb to the MA altitude. (Google Maps)


17

Approach, missed approach, departure & holding Approach, missed approach, departure and holding are published instrument procedures. They are characterised by waypoints, alitudes, headings, climb-, and descend profiles. An approach procedure tells you how to get from cruise to short final, from a holding to short final, or from cruise into a holding. ...


13

As Alexander already said in his answer, the turns over water are executed to gain enough altitude before turning back over the terrain. (left: RNAV-A, right: RNAV approach chart). The difference between the RNAV-A approach and the other two (RNAV and LOC) is the required minimum climb gradients for these two approaches. You find them at the bottom of the ...


11

DME can be used in the published missed, but does not have to be. There are other ways to identify the missed approach fix. The missed approach instructions are: MISSED APPROACH: Climb to 1500 then climbing right turn to 3500 on ATL VORTAC R-005 to TROYS INT/ATL 15 DME and hold. The missed approach procedure calls for a hold at the TROYS intersection. ...


9

Non precision MAP fixes are identified in a number of ways: Fixes identified by additional terrestrial Navaids eg intersections between the localizer and radial directions from other Navaid beacons like VORs, NDBs, etc.. Fixes identified by DME slant ranges. Fixes identified by flying a linear course from an identified FAF at a specific airspeed for a ...


5

Based on your question and the circumstances you indicate: On an approach that takes you down to 200' HAT (height above touchdown) and specifies a climbing turn without a "climb straight ahead to [some altitude] then climbing right turn," you should climb to 400 feet AGL and then start your right climbing turn along the missed approach course track. From ...


5

When it is not stated, it means it is the nominal value of 2.5%, i.e., for the first example, the LPV climb gradient is 2.5%. When an additional OCA/H is published, then the OCA/H and gradient values are published (second example). From PANS-OPS: 6.2.2.2 Climb gradient in the intermediate phase. The nominal climb gradient (tan Z) of the missed approach ...


5

I commuted to work in my plane into an airport with a landing fee for a few years (I was doing it frequently enough that I paid for an annual subscription with unlimited landings). In Canada you won't be charged if you go around and I can't imagine being charged in the US either. Although ATC records the landing, the fee is usually levied by the airport ...


4

This is spelled out in 91.175(c), in particular Operation below DA/DH or MDA. Except as provided in paragraph (l) of this section or § 91.176 of this chapter, where a DA/DH or MDA is applicable, no pilot may operate an aircraft, except a military aircraft of the United States, below the authorized MDA or continue an approach below the authorized DA/DH ...


4

When would you go missed if below MDA/DA(H)? You're only allowed to operate below the MDA/DA(H) if all of the following are true (14 CFR 91.175(c)): You can land using normal descent rate and maneuvers You have at least the flight visibility required for the approach You have at least one visual reference from the list (not just the approach lighting ...


3

I don’t really know the answer to 1), but you’re correct on 2) - obstacle clearance is not assured by regulations for a go-around below minima. However, due to all-engine aircraft performance most of the time far exceeding the procedure design assumptions, obstacle clearance is probably still fine operationally (at least in virtually all large commercial ...


2

Well, I’m not an FAA guy so I can’t find the relevant FAR quote, but going more general: ICAO Doc 8161 Vol 1 - Aircraft Operations I-4-6-1 6.1.4 Note 2 In the case of a missed approach with a turn at an altitude/height, when an operational need exists, an additional protection is provided for the safeguarding of early turns. When it is not possible, a ...


2

No, you can go missed anytime you feel you cannot complete the approach you are currently flying successfully. This includes anytime you are flying the final approach segment before reaching the VDP, if there is one, and all the way to the MAP at MDA. A failure of a required piece of equipment needed to fly the approach properly would be a mandatory reason ...


1

A straight missed approach can have a combination of both straight and turning parts. The straight part is called the intermediate missed approach, while the turning part is called the final missed approach. When a straight missed approach starts a turn of more than 15°, the turning missed approach criteria applies, as stated in Part I, Section 4, Chapter 6....


1

The clip doesn't show it, but you must be looking at an RNAV approach chart for 20R. The ILS charts for 20R show the holding pattern in the plates. Since RNAV states "Radar Required" if the pilot doesn't get further instructions he/she should immediately ask for them.


1

On Question 2: If there is a functioning DME on the airplane, and there was a DME signal that could be used, that is, a DME at the localizer or a DME at a VOR that is aligned with the approach path, yes you could use that, but it almost certainly the approach itself would be a VOR/DME approach and you would be using DME as primary anyway, with timing as a ...


1

A go around is terminology generally used during VFR flight. If a pilot is approaching the runway to land and decides that conditions are not conducive to a safe landing, he can opt to “go around”. This can be for a wide variety of reasons including the pilot or aircraft being unprepared for the landing, the descent to landing being performed poorly, or even ...


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