13

The naming is simple, from ICAO Annex 11: 2.1.2 The basic indicator shall be the name or name-code of the significant point where a standard departure route terminates or a standard arrival route begins. So check where your route terminates/begins. I'm suspecting you are asking in the context of flight simulation, because otherwise you can look up ...


12

Approaches into Schiphol are usually vectored by ATC during the day (see below for night operations). This means the controllers are giving instructions to pilots depending on the current traffic, which makes it hard to say when exactly planes will overfly Egmond aan Zee. If the Polderbaan (runway 18R/36L) is used for landing from the North (18R), planes ...


10

You can't, there is no system to them (at least no globally consistent system, airports may have a system for their own STARs and SIDs, and some countries for numbering airways, but nothing worldwide). What is common (but afaik no law/treaty) is for STARs and SIDs to be named after the entry/exit waypoint, which can help predict which you're likely to get ...


10

If the controller issues a "climb via" SID with an interim altitude of 8,000 and then subsequently amends the altitude and states: "Climb via SID and maintain Flight Level 240" then the altitude crossing restriction to cross INLAND at or above 14,000 still applies. However, if the controller does not use the words "Climb Via," and instead states: Climb ...


9

As it reads: ....on assigned transition, maintain FL190, expect filed altitude 10 minutes after departure. If no instructions are received after 10 minutes, remind the ATC. From the FAA FAQ: Q. I am cleared to "Climb Via SID". What if there is a published altitude restriction at a fix that is higher than the charted "Top Altitude"? A. You are ...


9

"Landing south" means the planes are facing south as they land. Depending on conditions, they could come from the opposite end of the runway, and would be "landing north." This is also referred to as "south flow/operations." If you look at a chart for the IVANE FIVE shown below, you can see why this is important. The runways at KCLT are primarly oriented ...


9

Definitions from this page. Metering: A method of time-regulating arrival traffic flow into a terminal area so as not to exceed a predetermined terminal acceptance rate. Metering airport: Airport adapted for metering and for which optimum flight paths are defined. Metering fix: A fix along an established route from over which ...


8

The textual description for OLIVI 4W is: OLIVI FOUR WHISKEY On track 256° to 6.0 DME MND; RT, on track 333° to KOSAX; LT, on track 294° to OLIVI. Climb with 7.9% (480 ft/NM) or more until passing 3000, then climb with 6.4% (390 ft/NM) or more until passing 6000. However, the remarks section holds the answer: 1. PDG 7.9% (480 ft/NM) due to obstacles. If ...


8

The "DESCEND VIA" clearance is described in FAA order 7110.65U (pdf) Section 4-5-7 paragraph h, which defines: h. Instructions to vertically navigate on a STAR/RNAV STAR/FMSP with published >restrictions. PHRASEOLOGY- DESCEND VIA (STAR/RNAV STAR/FMSP name and number) TERMINAL: DESCEND VIA (STAR/RNAV STAR/FMSP name and number and runway number). ...


8

It's a long established practice for the procedure developers to build the procedures around a theme. It helps with coming up with the necessary distinct pronounceable names for the waypoints. My personal favorite is the RNAV (GPS) RWY 16 approach into KPSM. Flying from the IAF to the MAP and the Missed Approach Holding waypoint you fly: ITAWT --> ITAWA -->...


7

Terrible question (not your question, but the test question). As far as I can tell, there are NO altitudes on the arrival that are mandatory; everything is an "expect" altitude only. When you are "cleared for the STELA ONE arrival", you are cleared to (required to) fly the lateral ground track, and comply with any airspeeds stated on the chart ("cross at ...


7

The best answer I can give is generally, no. In relatively few cases – for aircraft operated under Part 91 Subpart K, which applies to fractional ownership like Netjets – the operator must possess an Mspec, which would be applied for at the local FSDO. I'm not sure what that process looks like, but the FAA's Commercial Operations Branch has some good ...


7

My questions are: 1) When you enter the STAR in the the FMS, will it pre-populate the expected altitude, and does this show up in the FMS exactly the same as a mandatory crossing altitude? This depends on the model of FMS. Some of them don't even have Vertical Navigation (VNAV), and it really depends on the exact model. I will say that three of the ...


7

It means, don't file that transition yourself. ATC may assign it, but it's their option to assign it or leave you on what you filed.


6

In my experience, I've received a climb via SID many times at airports like Las Vegas and Teterboro. This is common at certain airports, but a lot of airports don't use it because the procedures aren't designed that way. I think that a lot of pilots, especially those flying smaller non-turbine powered aircraft, don't receive this type of clearance ...


6

FAA Because it is a fixed value at 18,000 feet. ICAO-style and Jeppesen They show the TA (and sometimes the TL) on SID charts. ICAO Annex 4 confirms the depiction on SID charts (chapter 9): 9.9.4.1 The components of the established relevant air traffic services system shall be shown. (...) 5) transition altitude/height to the nearest ...


6

According to the Jeppeson chart legend[pdf] those are database identifiers. I'm presuming that's what would show on a menu in the FMS.


6

Someone else will have to comment on whether the STAR in the FMS includes the altitudes as well. You are right, "expected" altitudes are suggestions so that pilots know about when they will need to begin their descent. Instructions from ATC are the final word, so they would either say "descend via" or specify the altitude if they were using the "expected" ...


6

The term "turbojet" in this context is used a bit more loosely. The pilot-controller glossary document from the FAA defines it as follows: TURBOJET AIRCRAFT− An aircraft having a jet engine in which the energy of the jet operates a turbine which in turn operates the air compressor. You can see this is general enough to include turbofan aircraft as ...


6

There are 3 STARs (Standard Terminal Arrival Routes) into JFK that cross over Long Island: PARCH 3 RNAV ARR: PAWLING 2 ARR: ROBER 2 ARR: (Jeppesen charts) None of these have particularly pronounced zigzag patterns, so what you describe is probably not coming from the waypoints of the arrival procedure. Looking at flightradar24.com, we can currently see ...


5

If you're given a Descend Via, then you use the STAR for vertical guidance, and usually those clearances are given on RNAV STARs. Otherwise, you'll be given explicit descent instructions the Expect is just a planning tool, such that you can be prepared if you're given, for example a Descend Pilots Discretion, cross STELLA at 11,000, or some other variation ...


5

I cannot speak for all of General Aviation (GA), but throughout the IFR portion of my flying career I have generally used SIDs wherever available. NOTE: This choice of using SIDs was not always mine, as ATC will often include a SID in a clearance unless requested otherwise. A pilot has two opportunities to avoid SID's if so desired: firstly, when filing the ...


5

Almost every major airport (Class B) would have what's called a STAR, a Standard Terminal Arrival Route. Busy Class B traffic doesn't necessarily follow a TPA (Traffic Pattern Altitude). For runway 09, the STAR doesn't show a speed limit. Some STARs have speed limits. But that's not to say the speed is at the pilot's discretion, as the airplane approaches ...


5

In 2012 South Korea presented to ICAO design issues with regard to PBN, of those design issues was the reference point for the MSA: (...) in terms of PBN procedures, every component which is used for RNP approaches or RNP AR approaches, such as waypoint, variation, track and buffer value etc. is based on the airport reference point (ARP). Therefore, it is ...


5

Some STARS are designed for specific runways (i.e. not all runways for the airport). For example, shown below is the BASET FIVE ARRIVAL to Los Angeles. It is designed for runways 6L/R or 7L/R: (not for runways 24L/R or 25L/R) page 1: page 2:


5

Look more carefully; says it right at the bottom. At the STAR's termination waypoint, LGA, expect radar vectors to final. If you had comm failure, and couldn't talk to ATC, you would fly the STAR in your clearance and if it is an open STAR like that, at the termination waypoint you would find your own way to the ILS/LOC and shoot the approach, taking the ...


5

It would be nice if there were an authoritative, canonical, source for these sorts of waypoints, but sadly, I don't think one exists. I say that because I hear controllers sometimes using a different set of vowels or syllable emphasis "today" than they did "yesterday". If there were a single "right" way to verbalize CNERY or SCTRR, I'd expect ATC to have ...


4

You ask about Jeppesen in the title, but you mention ICAO in the body. Does Jeppesen show top altitude? Yes. Top image is FAA chart, bottom is Jeppesen. Both for the LOOP SID. Does ICAO show top altitude? The ICAO charts are produced by NAAs based on ICAO's style if they don't have their own. The FAA has its own format. But the answer is also yes if the ...


4

As an example, say you receive an IFR clearance from clearance delivery prior to departure such as: "N1234 cleared to Los Angeles Airport, ATOME TWO DEPARTURE, ARRIE Transition, Q-One Forty-five, climb via SID, Squawk 2252, etc." Then, after passing 2000 ft. if the tower controller instructs you to "proceed direct ZUMBI" then he/she (controller) should issue ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible