36

White LED spectra contains quite a bit of blue range wavelength, which is bad for night vision. Red light is much better. The eyes have cone receptors for day time and rod receptors for night vision. The rods contain rhodopsin, which enables night vision. It takes about 1/2 hour for enough to build up to have full night vision. Exposure to shorter ...


35

That's because 8050-1 is the Aircraft Registration Application, and 8050-3 is the Certificate of Aircraft Registration. You submit 8050-1, and the FAA sends you 8050-3.


24

Quite simply because a random LED bulb is not certified for operation in an aircraft, and the light holder is not certified to operate with a LED bulb. In practice it would probably work fine, but it is not out of the question that a LED bulb (sometimes containing internal SMPS power supply) might emit electrical noise, or perhaps even fail in ways that a ...


10

My interpretation of the comment was that replacing the bulb with an LED is going to draw attention to the fact that you have broken the rules. If you are going to go rogue on a minor thing like this, give the inspector some plausible deniability. Sort of like if you buy some custom aftermarket taillights for your car that maybe aren't officially DOT ...


8

Empirically, yes it's legal. I've seen several reproduction WW1 aircraft myself at airshows with fake guns, missiles or bombs attached. And I was once at an EAA chapter meeting where a member demonstrated his fake gun 'firing' using compressed air. There are also factory-built aircraft with fake weapons added later, by the way. As to regulations on this, I'...


7

The short answer is that a mechanic can't ground a plane. There are lots of discussions online about this, and the typical scenario seems to be that a mechanic "refuses to sign off an annual" or something similar. (There are other scenarios too, where the mechanic refuses to return the aircraft and/or logbooks to the owner because of a dispute over ...


7

Yes, it's legal. The FAA has an amateur-built aircraft homepage with links to regulations, guidance etc. It's also very common. The Experimental Aircraft Association has a lot of resources too.


6

Short answer: no, you can't log it as PIC time. Remember that acting as PIC and logging PIC time are two completely different things. I'm assuming here that the flight was VFR under part 91. The rules for logging PIC time are in 14 CFR 61.51(e). Simplified - and ignoring the ATP and student scenarios - the times you can log PIC are: Sole manipulator of the ...


5

Unfortunately if you have never held a valid medical certificate since July 14, 2006, the answer is no. One of the eligibility requirements for BasicMed is that you must have held a medical certificate after that date. §61.89(d) states The holder of a student pilot certificate may act as pilot in command of an aircraft without holding a medical ...


5

Physical reasons for not changing to LED include Lower heat output - which sounds good unless there's something else dependent on the warmth. LED traffic signals in cold locations require heaters to melt ice, whereas the old 420V incandescent lamps keep themselves warm and ice-free. Lower power draw means less current - again plausibly good, unless there's ...


4

In the Center environment, at a non-towered airport, if you're cleared for a specific approach, that's what is being protected, including circling, and the missed approach. There is no provision for a pilot to change the approach without contacting ATC. Also, controllers do not clear for "circle to land", or any other runway "landing" ...


4

If his last medical expired valid before July 2006, it’s now like he has never had one at all. (A denial or revocation would be different.) However, if he does not believe he could pass a medical exam today, I would point out that FARs 61.53(b), 61.23(c)(2)(iv) and 61.303(b)(4) still prohibit sport pilots from flying if they are aware of any condition that ...


3

The "No pilot may begin an instrument approach procedure to an airport unless" is a section of it's own, named (a), followed by conditions (1) and (2). Section (a) is not linked to section (e) in the manner you suggest. Section (e) deals with a ... pilot in command of a turbine-powered airplane who has not served at least 100 hours as pilot in ...


3

The FAA's registration site says (emphasis in the original): If aircraft registration has expired and a renewal certificate has not been issued, received, and placed in the aircraft, then the aircraft is without authority to operate. [...] If a renewal application was first received by the Registry after the expiration date, the renewal process no longer ...


3

The FAA rewrote 14 CFR Part 23 entirely at the end of 2016, and those changes went into effect August 30, 2017. You can find a discussion of the changes made in the Federal Register at 81 FR 96572. The current standards are in the new 14 CFR Part 23, which I find easiest to browse on ecfr.gov. Based on my reading (I am not a lawyer, I am not your lawyer, and ...


3

What the current rule is doesn't really matter relative to the G5. The G5 was certificated via an AML STC. The rules in place when the application for the STC was made were the applicable rules. The STC remains valid even if the rules change unless the FAA specifically includes in the new rule that previously issued certificates are rescinded (which is ...


3

Your reading is correct: a Cessna 172 with an inoperative vacuum gauge is not airworthy. Type Certificate Data Sheet No. 3A12, Revision 85 shows how Cessna 172 models meet FAA airworthiness requirements. Section XII, “Model 172S, Skyhawk SP, 4 PCLM (Normal Category), 2 PCLM (Utility Category), Approved May 1, 1998,” contains Equipment The basic required ...


2

What you're looking for is AIM 4-1-9(g)(6), recommended self-announce phraseologies. The self-announce phrases states position, altitude, climb/descent, among other things depending on the situation. 6. Recommended self-announce phraseologies: It should be noted that aircraft operating to or from another nearby airport may be making self-announce broadcasts ...


2

It's really an apples to oranges question. A SID always has an initial segment below the minimum IFR altitude, because it is a departure route. STARs are similar in that regard. There is no implied minimum IFR altitude on either SIDs or STARs (Not to be confused with MEAs). This also applies to approach plates, which have a minimum safe altitude, which you ...


2

If you’re not operating under a Minimum Equipment List that requires one, and the typical General Aviation pilot in the USA is not, then “No” is the answer to your posted question. There is no requirement for a VSI under FAR 91.205 hence no specific VSI inspection requirement is stated. Note that in the USA prior to conducting flight under Instrument Flight ...


2

First, see this question for some extra context. As a general statement, you can use instrument training to count towards commercial training, but only if you can demonstrate that it met the commercial requirements. If you look at the commercial XC requirements, you can see it explicitly requires that the training has to be to commercial standards: (3) 20 ...


2

The title question is moot as "vortex generator" does not appear anywhere in the FARs or AIM— the FAA does not appear to define it or a high-lift device. From an engineering perspective high-lift devices are temporarily deployable when needed, whereas the vortex generators are an embarrassment, a lifelong drag penalty to fix an unexpected late-...


2

135.245 specifies the SIC need only have a commercial certificate with Category and Class, as well as an instrument rating. No minimum time is mentioned.


2

Yes, unless ATC instructions/charted instructions specify something to the contrary, you can immediately turn inbound for the holding fix, as long as you stay within the protected area till you leave the holding fix for the approach.


1

The certification process for the airworthiness of a type design in Europe is rather straightforward, regardless if it is a new design or a modification of an existing one: You establish a design bureau and apply for recognition as an Approved Design Organisation (DO) according to EASA Part 21 Subpart J. This requires to have specialists on hand for all ...


1

Both scenarios appear to be under 14 CFR Part 91. Scenario #1 is private carriage by virtue of being an employer owned aircraft flying employees, flown by an employee, for company business. Scenario #2 can get sticky. But, if the “donor” is not paying for the flight or compensating you or the owner/operator, it would still be Part 91. However, the “donations”...


1

As PilotDan has stated, instruction in the Cessna 310 can not be logged by either pilot unless the instructor holds an MEI. If either of the pilots does not hold a AMEL rating, that pilot can not log the C310 time as flight time at all. Not even as a safety pilot per 14 CFR 91.109. Ad hoc training can be given by any AMEL rated pilot. It just can’t be logged ...


1

The FAA has a guide to becoming an aviation mechanic, and the related regulations are in 14 CFR 65 Subpart D. In summary: Be at least 18 and be able to speak and write English Have 18 months experience working on airframes or powerplants; or, 30 months experience working on both Pass three tests: written, oral and practical The experience requirements are ...


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