40

You won't see it done in the fixed wing world unless the aircraft is tied down or otherwise securely restrained (like when you tie off the tail to something when hand starting your no-starter taildragger; some pilots just use chocks or parking brakes to hand bomb their airplane, but it's a terrible idea). However, it's common in the helicopter world ...


19

I'd say no, you're likely to be busted under 91.13... 14 CFR § 91.13 - Careless or reckless operation (a)Aircraft operations for the purpose of air navigation. No person may operate an aircraft in a careless or reckless manner so as to endanger the life or property of another. Having had a parking brake slip on a small GA aircraft once or twice ...


12

It would be very difficult for a lone pilot to hand prop start an aircraft without this occurring for some span of time, which would lead me to conclude that it is not forbidden.


11

Generally speaking, no. Legal or not, it is a very bad idea. To add some detail, in the Navy we would "hot switch" pilots occasionally in the EA-6B - shutting down the left engine on the pilot side, but leaving the right one running. In these cases the plane was chocked, (chained when shipboard) and there was always an NFO in the right seat to monitor ...


8

The FAA provides pretty clear definitions and/or explanations: Amateur built: Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR), part 21, section 21.191(g), defines an amateur-built aircraft as an aircraft "the major portion of which has been fabricated and assembled by person(s) who undertook the construction project solely for their own education or ...


1

As I understand it (I am not a pilot, nor do I live in the US) in the US: "amateur built" is a subset of "experimental". "experimental" aircraft are assesed and issued with airworthyness certificates on an individual basis under requirements less rigorous than the normal type-certification process. However the FAA doesn't want manufacturers using ...


1

"Experimental" was originally applied to development test aircraft only. The application of the term to amateur builts is an artifact of the early days of homebuilding in the early 50s, when the Civil Aviation Authority (FAA's predecessor) was persuaded to create a formal licensing structure for amateur built airplanes created for personal use, and they ...


1

Adding an instrument rating doesn't change the fact that your FAA private certificate is foreign-based. The IR is an add-on to a pilot certificate, it isn't a certificate itself. If you don't keep your foreign license current then you can't fly on your FAA foreign-based certificate. To get rid of your foreign-based certificate, you can either do a regular ...


1

You can log it all as XC. This is quite common. XC is all flight time to an airport more than 50 NM away from origin, even if you don't spend it flying in a straight line.


1

I'm a contractor flying public use aircraft that the Army owns. The contractors that operate these aircraft are governed by the Government organization that has contracted them and I guarantee you at a minimum they are required to have at least a commercial license with an instrument rating and have a couple thousand hours weather having a license is a ...


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