19

No, solo means you're alone in the aircraft. 14 CFR 61.51(d) says: Except for a student pilot performing the duties of pilot in command of an airship requiring more than one pilot flight crewmember, a pilot may log as solo flight time only that flight time when the pilot is the sole occupant of the aircraft.


16

Is the aircraft now IFR? No. The only way ATC can initiate an IFR clearance is by saying the words "CLEARED TO [location]" (7110.65 4–2–1b). The location they say is the clearance limit. If a pilot hears "CLEARED TO" they should know that they are receiving IFR separation (from both aircraft and terrain) and it is legal for them to enter ...


11

JERIT is the FAF for the LOC approach, as indicated by the Maltese cross. However, the FAF for the ILS approach is not JERIT; it is the Glide Slope Intercept Point (at 2000 ft indicated altitude) shown by the lightning bolt symbol, which in this particular approach happens to be at the same location as published for JERIT. Keep in mind, however, that the ...


6

There isn't much point in following step-down altitudes intended for a non-precision approach when flying an ILS. It just adds to workload. You want to capture the glide slope as far out as possible, where the sensitivity is lowest, and make the transition from level flight to glide slope descent once. So if I crossed an IF at the crossing altitude, and ...


6

In the Center, when vectoring for an ILS, we will give you an altitude that will be UNDER the glide slope (but at or above our minimum vectoring altitude) for the localizer intercept vector. Your clearance to join will have a heading to fly, and altitude to maintain until joining the localizer. We do this to ensure you're not "chasing the glideslope&...


6

In my opinion, your instructor is essentially correct. However, (again my opinion) you should strive for a "continuous" descent so as to pass the step-down fixes at an altitude not below the minimum published. You can do this by using the glideslope as a reference for your descent angle but ensuring that you don't go below any published minimum ...


5

To expand somewhat on HiddenWindshield's answer: From an ATC perspective we don't know and don't care if an airport is publically (municipally) owned, or privately-owned but public-use, or privately-owned and restricted-use. The regulations for ATC don't take that into consideration. The pilots request to fly into a given airport and ATC provides the ...


5

In class G you are not under Air Traffic Control and therefor you don't receive instructions. You may be receiving an Air Traffic Information Service and they will provide you with advisories. Advisories are not covered by 91.123, and thus within class G airspace 91.123 does not apply.


4

Back in 2017 the FAA allowed own-ship display on EFBs in-flight: AC120-76D replaces the -C version issued in 2014, which for commercial operators specifically prohibited use of geo-referencing or own-ship position display while using moving-map features in the air. Use of geo-referencing on the ground was previously considered acceptable by the agency. — ...


4

It isn't legal to fly an aircraft without a valid registration, however if the owner has applied for a new registration then they can fly the aircraft using the application as a temporary registration. So it's possible that the owner has repaired the aircraft, re-applied for registration, and is now flying the aircraft using the application as temporary ...


3

If an aircraft isn't flying in controlled airspace and is under Visual Flight Rules, then there's no requirement for the pilot to contact ATC at all. In fact, the plane doesn't even need to have a working radio onboard. So, in that scenario, there is no ATC, and each pilot using the field just watches out for any other traffic.


3

On a long-term basis the airline leases the rights to use certain gates from the airport authority. Then the airline decides which flights use which of their leased gates hour-to-hour. This information is transmitted to pilots via ACARS or a company air-to-ground radio frequency. If there is a separate Ramp Control operated by the airline it is possible that ...


3

In 2009 it was determined[a] BOS needs one RSA/EMAS improvement. BOS had already built two small beds on its own dime in 2005/6, but due to the determination, the one needed improvement was replaced on an extended new pier: Boston Logan International Airport (Boston, Massachusetts) must improve one RSA. This airport is constrained by Boston Harbor and urban ...


3

If you are above all the published altitudes for pre-FAF fixes you can intercept the GS but you must remain above the published minimum altitudes as apposed to remaining on glide slope. Approaches may also have defined intercept altitudes for the glide slope. This article explains why quite nicely; What this means to pilots is that on some approaches, ...


2

You are not certifying an aircraft so part 23 does not apply. Part 91 requires specific types of equipment only when flying above FL350 as follows: 91.211(b)(ii) At flight altitudes above flight level 350 unless one pilot at the controls of the airplane is wearing and using an oxygen mask that is secured and sealed and that either supplies oxygen at all ...


2

Typically, such wording means that the "specific configuration" must be stipulated when the designation is actually used. That is, it may depend on the context. Indeed, in the body of the document we see for "Light-sport aircraft" (emphasis mine): A maximum stalling speed or minimum steady flight speed without the use of lift-enhancing ...


2

In the US, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) makes the laws and enforces them for radio communications, not the FAA. The laws are contained in 47 CFR § 87. Section 87.18 says, "An aircraft station is licensed by rule and does not need an individual license issued by the FCC" (the sentence continues with information not relevant here). ...


2

There is no problem as long as you tell ATC your intentions. If you request an “approach”, they expect you to make a full stop. If you’re IFR, they will protect the miss just in case, but they’re not expecting you to actually use it. (Note: they don’t protect it if you’re VFR.) However, if you request a “practice approach”, they expect you to miss. It’s best ...


1

They function just like any other private airport. If the heliport is towered, the tower would hand departing traffic over to the appropriate departure controllers depending on the nature of the flight and the helipad’s proximity to other controlled airspace (IFR and VFR ops). If the helipad was non-towered, but lies within controlled airspace at the ...


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