42

The short answer is that in practice the FAA doesn’t care about “compensation” between family and bona fide friends. The long answer is that the FAA’s mission is to protect the general public from pilots. (If they also happen to protect pilots, that is a side effect at most.) Your parents and bona fide friends are not the “general public”. As a practical ...


11

This article from AOPA outlines the issues with ADHD pretty well. This article is from Canada but the medical policies are quite similar and you might find the basic information useful. Bottom line seems to be that once you are formally diagnosed with the condition, that becomes a problem. You can't be on ADHD medications at all (within the last 6 months) ...


6

As a US citizen you can own an N-reg aircraft directly, regardless of where you live. The regulations on aircraft registration are in 14 CFR Part 47. They say who can register an N-reg aircraft, but they don't say anything about where that person must be. 47.3(a)(1) simply says: §47.3 Registration required. (a) An aircraft may be registered under 49 U.S.C....


5

Certified flight instructor = CFI. Add a multiengine rating to your CFI and now you are a multiengine flight instructor, or MEI. An instructor with single and multiengine instructor ratings is commonly referred to as a CFI/MEI. What if you are a CFI but only in gliders? CFI-G is the most common shorthand. Pilot authorizations are specifically called "...


5

Delta-8-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-8-THC, Δ8-THC) is a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. It has psychoactive properties; the effects are less potent but comparable. Delta 8 THC metabolites trigger many drug tests looking for Delta 9 THC metabolites. These compounds are chemically similar. Whoever needs to pass a drug test (pilots included) should not ...


4

No, as a US citizen you do not need to jump through any hoops to register an N-reg aircraft in your name, anywhere in the world. It doesn't matter where you live. I used to own an N-reg aircraft when I lived in Germany. It was registered to my German address. When I moved back to the US and brought it with me I submitted a change of address, and that was the ...


4

The point being, once you've reached a full scale deviation in IMC, there's no telling how much beyond it the airplane has gone. Your USA AIM 5-5-5 is quoted here, and point 'b' is sufficient to conclude an immediate Missed Approach: 5-5-5. Missed Approach a. Pilot. 1. Executes a missed approach when one of the following conditions exist: (b) Determines ...


4

There are two standards, one for traditional pitot/static devices and one for air data computers. Traditional A/S indicators are covered by TSO-C2d which references Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc., (SAE) Aerospace Standard (AS) 8019, "Airspeed Instruments", dated March 30, 1981. Air data computers are covered by TSO-C106 which references SAE ...


3

The USA's national organization of aeromodelers advises pilots on page 4 of its safety guide: It’s important that you respect the privacy and property of others and be aware of your surroundings. What might seem like a cool flight path to you may be a nuisance or perceived as invasion of privacy by others. If they're an organized club (likely, as they're ...


3

The question is flawed because it presumes that you are flying a published instrument approach procedure in uncontrolled airspace without an IFR clearance. Looking at the VFR sectional you can see that there is a shaded magenta border around this airport that signifies Class E airspace, (controlled airspace) with a floor of 700' above the surface. You ...


2

It's legal if you have a suitable and acceptable RNAV system as described by FAA Rules. Also realize that it is only RNAV capability that provides for 'direct routing' without recourse to DR - Dead Reckoning - or Radar assisted DR needed by traditional Radio Aid based navigation. When an RNAV system navigates to an out of service VOR, it is flying a computed ...


2

Actually, in the US, the accepted term for a flight instructor by the FAA and the general aviation (not to be confused with General Aviation) public is Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI). An instructor for instrument ratings is called a Certificated Flight Instructor-Instrument (CFII). This is opposed to a Basic Ground Instructor (BGI) or an Advanced ...


2

I'm surprised that all the answers and comments so far have been about resorting to laws, other higher authorities, or anti-aircraft batteries, and that nobody has suggested being nice. When you say that you approached them to stop and they refused, that sounds like you went and talked to people flying their RC planes. Presumably the RC airfield is leased ...


2

I am a Designated Senior AME in the Southern Region. I have never seen this gimmick before, neither have I even seen or heard of a discussion of this modification. I would therefore say it is not a proscribed practice. I would go on to say that any airman holding a Medical certificate that I issued already is quite familiar with my office and contact info. I ...


2

Testing standards for things like turbulence and fatigue are not related to any specific aircraft type certificate. Yes, the MAX shares the same type certificate as the first 737-100, but the TC only makes reference to the certification standards to which the design complies. If you look at the TC you will see that it references the advisory circular for ...


2

According to NBAA, trusts are used by non-US citizens to register aircraft with the FAA. Because you are a US citizen, it looks like you don't need a trust to maintain the FAA registration. Here's the article with references to the FARs: https://nbaa.org/flight-department-administration/aircraft-registration-transactions/owner-trusts/ . Here's an aviation ...


1

I agree with skipper44's interpretation of the maneuvers for a safe landing being the broad reasoning that if you dont know how far off course you are you cant make a safe landing. I did some more digging and Ill present another option from the FAA that might also satisfy the question. According to 14 CFR § 91.181 - Course to be flown when operating under ...


1

In order to find out whether a particular operation requires an operating certificate or an air carrier certificate (and thus must conform to Part 135 or 121 or etc), you have to look at Part 119, which describes all the operations that need to be conducted under those Parts. So let's take a look at FAR 119.1: This part applies to each person operating or ...


1

The short answer is yes, an aircraft owner can hire a pilot to fly him or her, as well as other friends and family, and operate under Part 91. This is called private carriage, as opposed to common carriage. Just to clarify a few points: The pilot hired would need to have a Commercial Pilot Certificate, even if no money changes hands, because the FAA ...


1

Regulations don't usually include detailed technical requirements or specifications, but AC61-107B - Aircraft Operations at Altitudes Above 25,000 Feet Mean Sea Level or Mach Numbers Greater Than .75 / with Change 1 says (p. 33, emphasis in the original): Only oxygen that meets or exceeds the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) International Aerospace ...


1

I would like to point out that the FAA's answer says that the clock can be an "installed appliance with a permanent clock display that meets the requirements of§ 91.205(d)(6) that displays "hours, minutes, and seconds with a sweep-second pointer or digital presentation," is adequate for the purposes of this regulation." Please note that ...


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