30

The FAA doesn't consider adding oil to be maintenance. The Hochberg (2016) interpretation says: The subject of adding oil is often debated; however, we note that it is not an item included in part 43, appendix A, paragraph (c), which lists items the FAA considers to be preventive maintenance. Also see the FAA's Flight Standards Information Management ...


20

The FAA allows pilots to do maintenance themselves. It’s outlined in the following doc from the FAA as well as the full regulation here. I would say engine oil falls under: Lubrication not requiring disassembly other than removal of nonstructural items such as cover plates, cowlings, and fairings.


8

The bottom line is that it is up to you. It would be very beneficial to get as much simulated IFR time as possible. It does not matter if it is with your school CFII, a school student, the club CFI, a club student, or an unaffiliated and current pilot friend. Your CFII should not have a problem with that. Instruction (and the cost of it) is about you, not ...


7

Can the acting PIC sit in the rear seat? There's no regulation or FAA interpretation I can find that requires the acting PIC to sit in a seat with access to the controls. For flight instruction specifically, 14 CFR 91.109(a) requires dual controls (usually) and the instructor must be at a "pilot station" (14 CFR 61.195(g)(2) and Williams ...


7

The answer by pithblot is more or less correct. The 12,500 lb. limit was chosen as an approximate halving of the DC-3 gross takeoff weight. Consider the following quote: As noted earlier, when first promulgated, the 12,500 lb. weight limit could be understood in light of the general use of the DC-3, an aircraft with a maximum gross takeoff weight of 25,000 ...


7

Things change. Recently an airline captain who is insulin dependent, flew with a First Class special issuance medical. At this moment, there are six airmen in the US who have First Class special issuance for insulin dependent diabetes. I suggest that your friend may want to re-investigate his obtaining a medical. The guidance for third class is here: https:...


7

I can't find a reference to link, but in the transport world, adding oil comes under the category of "replenishment", and is the same as adding fuel or topping off a reservoir that is crew-accessible. Many corporate aircraft have oil replenishment systems for servicing engine oil, intended to be usable by the flight crew. On the CRJ regional ...


6

Absent an explicit instruction to the contrary, VFR traffic can do whatever it wants in class C/D/E airspace. ATC is not supposed to give you both lateral and vertical control instructions at the same time because that could interfere with your ability to maintain VFR cloud clearance requirements. Class B has different cloud clearance, so you will almost ...


6

By default, all controlled airspace (class E and up) is owned by an ARTCC. In many areas, they delegate airspace (including class E!) to other ATC facilities, either a TRACON or a Tower. Unfortunately, that info isn't on Sectional or Terminal Charts; you have to look in the Chart Supplement (formerly Airport/Facility Directory). For KGFL, we see: ARTCC: ...


6

There is a little bit of a misunderstanding in your premise. There is a difference between an alternate airport and a diversion airport. An alternate airport is your listed optional destination for the purposes of filing a flight plan. A diversion airport is the airport to which you head when you can not land at your original destination. They may be one in ...


4

As background, see this question for a general explanation of how safety pilots can log time. Also have a look at the Gebhart (2009) interpretation for the cross-country part. Note that the two key things to keep in mind in these logging scenarios are: Acting as PIC and logging PIC time are two different things You have to be very clear about who is the ...


3

Screen height is based on the height of a (London) "double decker bus, as used in the original trials at Croydon, where they hit one while taking off." Source: Phil Croucher (2019) EASA Professional Pilot Studies, p.9-6


3

At least in the US, this is perfectly legal. There have been quite a few such aircraft in history. However, an aircraft docking and undocking from another is so rare that there's no standard way of communicating it with ATC. So you'd have to explain what you're doing in plain language. (And then you'd have to explain it again when the confused controller ...


3

As @Florian answers, the short answer is that we actually need to look at the term "baseline," which is the legal term used in international treaties. The authority for FAA jurisdiction over the airspace defined in §91.1 is given in 49 USC  40103. This is shown in the official Federal Register docket of 14 CFR 91.1 which lists all authority basis ...


3

Coastline means the territorial sea baseline. In the language of international treaties like UNCLOS, the territorial sea doesn't include internal waters, regardless of their size. NOAA confirms this, notes however also, that not all US court decisions follow that view. NOAA also provides a map to view the US territorial waters & exclusive economical zone,...


3

As you already noted, 61.129(a)(3)(ii) says "training" (emphasis mine): (ii) 10 hours of training in a complex airplane, a turbine-powered airplane, or a technically advanced airplane (TAA) that meets the requirements of paragraph (j) of this section, or any combination thereof. [...] Here's the definition of training in part 61, per 14 CFR 61.1: ...


2

It has to be dual instruction per 14 Title CFR PART 61.129: §61.129 Aeronautical experience. (a) For an airplane single-engine rating. Except as provided in paragraph (i) of this section, a person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane category and single-engine class rating must log at least 250 hours of flight time as a pilot ...


1

Be sure to verify that the airport in question specifically has a "Class E Surface Area". This will be denoted by a dashed line encircling the airport on the sectional map - like a Class D in magenta instead of blue. Typical Class E airports will only be surrounded by a magenta gradient designating transition area and the Class E airspace only ...


1

Assuming that you are asking about the US, there are two parts to your question-total time and Complex/Turbine/TAA time. As to whether the RV meets the requirements for a TAA that depends on what instrumentation/avionics it has. If it meets the definition, then you can use if for the training part of the aeronautical experience. §61.129 Aeronautical ...


1

An FAA-appointed Designated Pilot Examiner has recently told me that it is legal to fly an airplane or glider in clouds in Class G airspace with no clearance, if the aircraft is appropriately equipped and the pilot has an instrument rating in airplanes. On the other hand, here is a case, originally noted in an answer to a related question on ASE, where a ...


1

It is possible- which is a strategy that is commonly thought of in conjunction with space tourism. You can not only start a plane in air using another airplane but also start a hybrid rocket from an airplane in air. For that look up SpaceShipOne and its carrier aircraft.


1

The restriction to cross "BHAWK at FL240" is overridden by the controllers latest clearance to "Descend Via FYTTE5 arrival", unless they include the instruction descend via "EXCEPT MAINTAIN FL240". FAA Climb Via/Descend Via Speed Clearances Frequently Asked Questions, page 6, questions 8. If unsure, you should query ATC though....


1

I can't find any regulation that says "every flight is either VFR or IFR", maybe because it's such a fundamental thing. 14 CFR 1.1 defines IFR and SVFR as differing from VFR, but doesn't actually define VFR itself. The only explicit statement I can see is 91.101: This subpart prescribes flight rules governing the operation of aircraft within the United ...


1

The reg. states that IN or ABOVE CLASS C airspace when class C IS active a MODEC transponder is required, if CLASS C is not active you are in CLASS E airspace and a transponder is NOT required below 10.000 ft MSL, Unless you are in the MODE C VEIL.


1

All part 107 aircraft must be registered, regardless of weight. The question addresses the case of Part 101 flyers, who were exempt from registration. Regulations have changed, and the Exception for Recreational Flyers now requires aircraft above 250g, used for recreational flights, to be registered. Hence a registration number would be available for ...


1

We file NOTAMs for sUAS at my military base by calling 1-800-WXBRIEF. Talk to the flight service specialist and they can complete the NOTAM for you.


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