22

If you read the details in the Federal Register, you can see that this refers to crosswind handling on the ground, not in the air: The folding wingtips and their operating mechanism must be designed for 65 knot, horizontal, ground-gust conditions in any direction as specified in § 25.415(a). Relevant design conditions must be defined using combinations of ...


15

You are sort of correct. For the ground instruction for your basic Private Pilot Certificate, it would not really matter. For the actual flight instruction, the CFI has to be certificated for the category and class of aircraft in which you are being trained by them. If the aircraft is a taildragger, high performance, and/or complex aircraft, the CFI will ...


7

Operating as PIC under IFR always requires an instrument rating and currency, regardless of flight conditions. 14 CFR 61.3(e) requires the rating, and there's no exception for VFR conditions: (e) Instrument rating. No person may act as pilot in command of a civil aircraft under IFR or in weather conditions less than the minimums prescribed for VFR flight ...


6

The FAA mandates a maximum to the stall speed, not a minimum. The minimum speed must not be higher than a given value. The minimum speed is limited in order to reduce the risk and severity of accidents, especially during landing. The same was used in FAR 23 where a speed limit of 61 knots was mandated for singe-engined aircraft and multi-engined aircraft of ...


4

The FAA’s regulations (14 CFR 1.1, “light sport aircraft”, paragraph 4) require a stall speed no higher than 45kt (51mph) for a plane to be certified as a Light Sport Aircraft. This is a maximum value, not a minimum. The stall speed is the lowest speed at which the wing generates lift. Below this speed, the plane essentially stops flying and Bad Things(tm) ...


4

Take a look at the equipment list of the Cessna 150. There are part numbers for every piece of equipment installed. If the part numbers do not match, then the airplane does not comply with its type certificate data sheet and is not airworthy. Take a look in the maintenance manuals and find the part numbers. If the rental FBO refuses to let you see those ...


4

While the aircraft that you buy could conceivably require your CFI to possess certain additional ratings, such as if you purchase a twin-engine plane or a jet, most smaller, single-engine, prop planes will be covered under your CFI’s Single Engine Land (SEL) rating.


3

Or you can depart on a IFR flight plan and when airborne request a "VFR climb to ___ (terrain plus 1000 feet or 2000 in mountainous terrain or MVA). You have now accepted responsibility for terrain clearance. The controller will still vector you for traffic seperation.


3

Yes, you can in the US in Class D, E & G airspace according to 14 CFR 91.215. You will need to placard the transponder INOP, and make a note in the aircraft logbook. But, you must stay out of any Mode C Veils, and further than 30 miles from Class B airports. Also, stay below 10,000 feet MSL unless that means you are below 2,500 feet AGL. However, you can ...


3

Yes, but. With one notable exception, for any pilot to legally fly an aircraft, they must be rated for that category and class of aircraft. Some (generally larger) types of aircraft also require a type rating. So, if you purchased a Cessna 172 (a very common primary trainer), your CFI would need to be rated for Airplane category, Single Engine Land class (...


3

Question 1: Can the LOC-D be flown with the tower closed at all? (The Alternate Minimums clearly state Circling is NA with the tower closed and LOC-D is a circling only approach. But aircraft are commonly cleared LOC-D approach with tower closed...) Ans: The restriction eliminating the option of flying the LOC-D with the tower closed only applies when ...


2

Easy, peasy. Fill out a label/sticker with the endorsement printed on it. Then, all you have to do is sign it and place your CFI number on it. You can then either scan it or take a photo of it. Your student can upload the scanned document or photo into an electronic logbook. If they do not have an electronic logbook, they can print out the endorsement at the ...


2

The single B-737 type rating includes all variants of it, from the -100 through the Max; if you were typed in a -200, you have the type, so there is nothing else required in that regard to be Second In Command (SIC) on a 737 NG. (Source... my experience, having flown the -200, classics, NG's, and the Max, all with the one "B-737" type on my ...


2

Just as a ballpark estimate, a trip like that in a Robinson R44 would likely be your most cost-effective option, and would take approximately 2 hours flight there and 2 back. Even if you get 500 dollars per flight hour and no holdover charge (which would be a stellar deal), you're looking at a minimum of 2,000 dollars for this trip - probably more. Now for ...


2

I can not find any guidance other than what you have already noted for Class B airspace endorsements. The ground and flight training requirements seems to be left up to the discretion of the CFI. Though, it seems to be very similar to a solo endorsement as having criteria that is subjective to student and instructor. Similar to a solo endorsement, a ...


2

The only regulations that apply to ultralights are in part 103. Apart from the obvious visibility and cloud clearance (103.23) and daylight (103.11) ones I see two others that could apply: 103.9(a): No person may operate any ultralight vehicle in a manner that creates a hazard to other persons or property. This seems to be the part 103 equivalent of 91.13 (...


2

Here is an answer I found after a few minutes of looking up regulations online. Federal Aviation regulations require carriage of FAA approved floatation gear when operating under Part 91 for hire (FAR 91.205(b)(12)), but Part 91 flights not conducted for hire are not required by the FAA to carry floatation equipment. It is worth noting that local ...


1

As Stephen said, you are good as long as your Med cert was not revoked, suspended, or declined upon renewal. A medical of any type is the requirement. That being said, you had a first class certificate with third class privileges.


1

Your first-class medical certificate issued in May 2005 granted, since you were under 40 at the time: First class privileges until May 31, 2006 Second class privileges until May 31, 2006 Third-class privileges until May 31, 2010 Since that last date is after July 14, 2006, then assuming it expired valid and you have not applied for another medical ...


1

I've had public use jet transport pilots tell me that they do not have to comply with FAA requests (demands) for a "ramp check," wherein pilots of the same aircraft type in mainstream commercial operations would need to allow physical access and would have to produce requested documents demonstrating pilot, operator and aircraft compliance with ...


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