28

This is an educated guess, based on history: Electric razors were once well known as prone to generating elctromagnetic interference -- the ones available in the 1940s could pretty well blanket a nearby AM broadcast radio receiver. However, in similar time frames, it was very important for oxygen masks to fit closely on the face, and beard stubble, besides ...


5

Well, a wristwatch can't be used to sneak around the requirement that IFR requires a clock mounted in the aircraft, FAR 91.205(d)(6). A missing or inoperative clock isn't likely in a modern airliner. As far as the FAA is concerned, a wristwatch is nothing more than jewelry. Ages ago, a wristwatch may have helped with calculating fuel burn and range, but ...


4

The requirements for providing instrument instruction are in 14 CFR 61.195(c) and they don't mention currency at all. There are also various FAA legal interpretations on whether or not CFIs (not CFIIs) require an instrument rating to provide instrument training (see this question), and what instrument training requires a CFII in the first place (see this ...


3

I have not found any LOI's that cover this specifically but a broad interpretation of § 91.205 Powered civil aircraft with standard category U.S. airworthiness certificates: Instrument and equipment requirements. ... (d)Instrument flight rules. For IFR flight, the following instruments and equipment are required: ... (2) Two-way ...


3

For FAA purposes you can log PIC time in the T6 because you hold a license in the airplane, single engine, land category and class. However, the USAF might not see it that way. Since you do not have an FAA license for the category and class multi engine land, you can only log PIC time for your solo flights in the T38.


3

If the airplane meets the definition, which almost all multi-engine pistons will, then you can get your complex endorsement. There is even one training center that advertises getting your multi and complex at the same time. §61.1 Applicability and definitions. Complex airplane means an airplane that has a retractable landing gear, flaps, and a ...


2

When I was with Weber Aircraft we provided many lavatories for Boeing aircraft. There was never any requirement for a passenger in the lav during structural tests/qualification. Based on this I know that it would be illegal for have someone in the lav during takeoff or landing as it would exceed the structural qual test requirements.


2

With virtually every major US air carrier today using EFB's, the use of paper charts in the flight deck has largely fallen to the wayside. Flight crews are still being provided with the exact same information, only now it is in digital form. Most, if not all US air carriers use navigational charts and plates published by Jeppesen. Unlike FAA NACO charts and ...


2

A large portion of part 23 was changed at the end of 2016. The utility, acrobatic, and commuter categories will not be used for new certifications. Old aircraft will retain the old category limits used for their certification. In place of the old system the "normal" category now covers up to 19 passengers and 19000 pound gross weight, it is divided into ...


2

In the US, yes. According to the FARs you only need to have three hours in an airplane in preparation for the flight test and you must fly the cross country in an airplane so that’s probably another 3 hours. It looks like you can log hours under the hood in a glider, but it would have to be with an airplane CFII. However, I don’t know that you would be ...


2

If your child is going to be around airplanes and flying with you for the next 12 years, they're not going to need to log time from back when they are 4 years old. They will have plenty of logged time later in life. I would suggest that you pick an age, say at least 8 or 10, where your children can start to fill in log books of their own. If they keep an ...


1

The AIM is not regulatory, just best practices approved by the FAA. You should do what the AIM says, but as PIC you are free to ignore it. The FARs are regulatory, so as long as you don't violate them, what you're doing is legal. You must do what the FARs say (unless you have an emergency, of course). In the case of pattern entry, other pilots are ...


1

FAR 61.113(i) authorizes flight as PIC when using BasicMed. Therefore, your buddy can act as safety pilot if he is also acting as PIC. If you were acting as PIC, that would make your buddy SIC (as a required crew member), which still requires a traditional medical certificate.


1

Stuff you quoted in your question seems to provide the answer you're after: 2.6 Approved manoeuvres Category „Utility“: The glider is certified for normal gliding in the "Utility" category. Simple aerobatics are approved but only without waterballast and with the weight of the rear pilot compensated by ballast in the ballast box in the fin see section 6.8....


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