8

EDIT: With the additional information that the oil pressure gauge is "pegged", the CFI is correct in calling it un-serviceable. It sounds like the A&P has checked the engine oil pressure with another means and finds that the actual engine oil pressure reading is within limits. The A&P then signs it off thinking that a correct gauge reading is not ...


5

It just means an engine using a pressurized oil system to the main and cam bearings. These systems require oil pressure to keep the metal of the bearing and the journal separated, as opposed to roller or ball bearings where there is direct rolling metal contact and the oil only needs to be splashed (radials use roller/ball bearings typically for the main ...


4

Certainly not. Eyeglasses can't fix everything. Some people have very poor vision even after correction with glasses. One example out of many, would be someone suffering from macular degeneration.


3

In general aviation and even working in FBOs, I have referenced AC43.13 to approve repairs that the CMM does not cover. These processes and techniques are approved by the Administrator. In general terms, the FAA tends not to tell you how to meet a requirement but rather gives the requirement then the organization has to meet that requirement through a FAA ...


3

No, a pilot with CP-ASEL-IA and CFI-ASE who is instrument current can take a student into actual IMC, and can even log it in both logbooks as dual training if the instruction is on the area of operation described in FAR 61.107(b)(1)(ix) "Basic Instrument Maneuvers" (etc) because that AOA is towards a private pilot certificate. However, this would be a Dumb ...


3

Short answer: pilots need flight visibility, ATC needs ground visibility. There are two different definitions of visibility in the regulations you mentioned: flight visibility and ground visibility. They're defined in 14 CFR 1.1: Flight visibility means the average forward horizontal distance, from the cockpit of an aircraft in flight, at which prominent ...


2

The regulation means you need to land at three separate airports. This should include landing at your original departure airport at the end of the flight. ยง61.109(a)(5)(ii) One solo cross country flight of 150 nautical miles total distance, with full-stop landings at three points, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance ...


2

In cases where a given unit of airspace (for example, a Class D circle around an airport with a tower) is only in effect part time, there is always a note to this effect in the FAA's "Airspace Designations and Reporting Points" document. The current (August 2019) edition of this document is FAA Order JO 7400.11D. The Class B airspace for KSLC is listed on ...


2

The first class medical vision requirements are in 14 CFR 67.103 (emphasis mine): Eye standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) Distant visual acuity of 20/20 or better in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses. If corrective lenses (spectacles or contact lenses) are necessary for 20/20 vision, the person may ...


1

Taking a "High Speed Taxi" refers to using a specific taxiway designed to exit the runway at a high speed after landing. The term does NOT refer to using ANY taxiway at a high speed. Larger busier class D, C, and B airports have these highspeed taxiways. An example of this is Taxiway Hotel at Van Nuys off of 16R. Thus the pilot you mentioned was requesting "...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible