25

Indeed USA deviates from ICAO: 5.2.2.4 Zeros are not used to precede single-digit runway markings. An optional configuration of the numeral 1 is available to designate a runway 1 and to prevent confusion with the runway centerline. Source: USA AIP - GEN 1.7 Differences From ICAO SARPs 5.2.2.4 in ICAO SARPs Annex 14 (Aerodromes) is as follows (emphasis ...


18

It depends on the operator's "opspecs" which are negotiated between them and the FAA. Generally in the US the vast majority of part 121 scheduled airline operations are required to be IFR, but plenty of part 135 charters are permitted to fly VFR. They may be subject to weather minimums higher than the general VFR limits.


11

The general FAA rule is indeed that ATC cannot issue a clearance to cross multiple runways. However, waivers are available to airports with parallel runways close enough to make it impractical or even hazardous for aircraft to stop in between them and wait for a second instruction. They are essentially treating such a pair as a single runway for the ...


7

This scenario isn't common but it isn't exactly rare, either. You take off with a full plane & lots of fuel for holding & an alternate, planning to arrive just at max landing weight. Then, due to shortcuts and/or better than forecast tailwinds, you under-burn & see that you'll arrive above max landing weight. First, the hypothesized rule in Part ...


5

From USA AIP (emphasis added): The U.S. does not require or provide criteria for clearways in its design standards. It does encourage ownership and clearing of the land underlying the innermost portion of the approach out to where the approach surface is 10.5 meters above the level of the take-off surface. You may also want to check AC 150/5300-13A - ...


5

The safety pilot cannot log cross-country time. The FAA has issued a Legal Interpretation (Gebhart) that clarifies the FAR. Section 61.65(d) contemplates that only the pilot conducting the entire flight, including takeoff, landing, and en route flight, as a required flight crewmember may log cross-country flight time. Because a safety pilot does ...


5

You should have an alternate planned that is forecast VFR, with appropriate fuel reserves in place, before you left. But if you didn't, you'd call an ATC unit and tell them your predicament. Maybe they can send you to VFR conditions either reported by PIREP or by calling around to other tower units in range. Otherwise, you're going to have to do an ...


4

@StephenS is right about San Francisco being an example that is exempt from the 2010 rule. The FAA ATC Job Order discusses this point in § 3-7: At those airports where the taxi distance between runway centerlines is less than 1,000 feet, multiple runway crossings may be issued with a single clearance. The air traffic manager must submit a request to the ...


4

To my surprise, the FAA clause was added in 2006 after the 2004 notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) No. 04-11. Three NTSB recommendations were part of the reason, with the earliest from 1992 (A-92-035). (...) autopilot failures that can result in changes in attitude at rates that may be imperceptible to the flightcrew (...) From the NPRM: This ...


4

On the ground during the preflight check, the altimeters must be within 75 feet of each other. In-flight the altimeters must be within 200 feet of each other. I have been flying the B777 for about 8 years and I have never seen the altimeters disagree by more than about 10 feet, either on the ground or in flight.


2

According to FAR 61.1, one of the requirements of cross-country flight is that it is flight time that includes a landing at a point other than the point of departure. Presumably, no one is under the hood at that point, and so only the pilot who makes that landing is logging time at that moment, and so only they can log it as cross country time. XC time also ...


2

I couldn't find an FAA regulation, but AC 91-85B Authorization of Aircraft and Operators for Flight in Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) Airspace Document Information page B-4 says 200ft: At cruise FL, the two primary altimeters should agree within 200 ft (60 m) or a lesser value if specified in the aircraft operating manual. (Failure to meet ...


2

In my opinion, navigating an IFR flight plan is more than just the ability to get from one airport to the other. I am also concerned about communication radio failure. If you follow the advice listed in the AskACFI website, you will not have many options if your communication radio fails It is this reason, why service volumes (see AIM 1-1-8) for VOR and ...


2

The US AIM (Aeronautical Information Manual) says: When necessary, the tower controller will issue clearances or other information for aircraft to generally follow the desired flight path (traffic patterns) when flying in Class B, Class C, and Class D surface areas and the proper taxi routes when operating on the ground. If not otherwise authorized or ...


2

I did a little rooting around and from what I can find and from my own general sense the answer is no. No regulation could possibly be issued based on what is effectively a somewhat abstract environmental goal (or maybe an objective of really really cheap airline) that supersedes regulations related to safety or efficiency in the system. That being said, ...


1

At a controlled airport, you need a clearance to land, and sometimes to enter its airspace (varies by class of airspace and country). How to enter the pattern is not a clearance, at least if you're VFR. Depending on other traffic in the area, ATC may give explicit instructions on how to enter the traffic pattern. If there's no other traffic present (or at ...


1

Based on the FAA Safety Alert posted below, since June 2010 controllers were no longer allowed to give multiple runway crossings at the same time: Instructions to cross a runway will be issued one at a time. Instructions to cross multiple runways will not be issued. An aircraft or vehicle must have crossed the previous runway before another runway ...


1

This question was answered here on this Website. Read the second answer. Yes you can file direct even without a GPS. However it would be advisable to perform a RAIM check during your pre-flight along your intended route and determine that you would be in RAIM during the route. If for some reason your GPS loses RAIM capability then you should proceed ...


1

Piling on to an earlier answer, but with some more tangible references. Noting that your post doesn't specify which country you're flying in, there does seem to be an international standard (defined by ICAO). I highly recommend using this resource to help understand several relevant regulations. Starting with the FAA... The FAA regulation is found in ...


1

Another question touched this particular topic so I am linking it for your benefit. When has a pilot legally accepted an ATC clearance or instruction? The consensus is that the pilot is the PIC (Person In Command) and has the final authority. So there is actually no formal or explicit answer to your question.


1

Unless someone can find an old 14CFR Part 25 ruling that has the explicit reasoning, I believe you are right to consider that the rationale for giving extra performance credit to airplanes that have demonstrated minimum unstick speed ($V_{MU}$) limited by tail contact is that they are not limited by aerodynamics. However, I should point out that the intent ...


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