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23

ATC can not only ask for a minimum speed, but rather instruct each aircraft to (more or less) exactly fly at a particular speed. This is essential for maintaining separation. As J. Hougaard pointed out in the comments, the speed on the last 4 NM is always up to the pilot to slow down to final approach speed. It is the duty of the pilot to evaluate if it is ...


9

In North America, just buy an air-band radio and listen to Raleigh-Durham tower all you like, or if your ham unit receives the aviation VHF frequencies, do that. Or find it on LiveATC.net It's only illegal to broadcast without authorization, not listen in.


6

I would suggest to contact the IT ANSP and ask if they accept applications for ready entry ATCOS: https://www.enav.it/sites/public/en/LavoraConNoi/Traduzione-di-Contatti-n.html In Germany we have plenty of so called „ready entries“ who applied for a job as ATC in Germany while holding a valid non-EU ATCO license. After an assesment by our company and - ...


5

I think you will find there isn't a correct answer for this, and that answers will primarily be opinion based. That said, my opinion is that if you have ADS-B, be patient and let ATC do their job. Speak up eventually, of course. Especially if you see a clear converging path on your scope. The 3nm you suggested seems like as good a point as any to ...


5

The white squares are aircraft - it's course is indicated by a line. Then there is a datablock showing Callsign "FWA170C", its altitude F053 = Flighlevel 53 = 5300ft, climbing to an assigned flightlevel 190 = 19000ft. A = altitude - below a defined transition level F = flightlevel (steps of 100ft) - above a defined transition altitude Transition altitude ...


3

Some towers have a data terminal that allows them to create and update flight plans*; these are typically the ones busy enough to have a separate Clearance Delivery frequency, but you'll find exceptions both ways. Other towers do not and would have to call a facility that does, which takes that controller away from actually controlling traffic; these towers ...


3

Generally speaking, you should trust ATC. As a pilot, you do not have the full picture. Just because two aircraft are cleared to the same level, does not mean they are going to get anywhere near each other. As for using TCAS or similar, this article describes an interesting incident, where one pilot decided to make a turn, based on his TCAS display, which ...


1

From my experience in busy airspace (Chicago, New York, San Francisco), ATC will ask you to maintain a specific speed until the final approach fix. Usually this speed is faster than what you'd ideally be doing at that position. After the FAF, you can slow to the appropriate final approach speed. It's true that approach speeds vary depending on weight and ...


1

The answer is yes, tower simulators are indeed used in civil ATC training. An example video of a professional ATC simulator can be seen here. It shows that not only tower control training is supported, but also ground control (executed from the tower cabin), approach, and area control. The student can be at various skill levels (to become a controller, to ...


1

My understanding is that a training provider needs approval from authorities for the full training program offered, and the simulator is only one part of this. The regulation 2015/340 lists areas to consider for the authorities, based on the authorities being competent to judge OK or not in the given context. Thus, a simulator can't get approval as such ...


1

In accounts of World War I aviation you will sometimes read of pilots operating in clouds for extended periods. It strains credulity to think that this was actually possible with the primitive instrumentation of the time. It is very difficult to maintain control of an airplane or glider in cloud without at least one gyroscopic instrument to give an ...


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