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FAA Order JO 7110.65W - ATC Procedures, Chapter 10 outlines how ATC should handle procedures for emergency situations Right at he very beginning, we see the most important part: 10-1-1(d) Because of the infinite variety of possible emergency situations, specific procedures cannot be prescribed. However, when you believe an emergency exists or is ...


11

Yes, generally speaking, the runway can be used. That said, whether or not it will actually be done depends on many different factors, such as the type of emergency, the size of the airport (maybe there are multiple runways), the current traffic load, the emergency response required etc. The fire marshall would most likely be the only person who could ...


9

It depends on the system. Assuming only secondary radar is available, in some systems, the track will indeed just disappear when radar contact is lost. Other systems will put the track in "coasted" mode, continuing to show the track (but with another track symbol), waiting to pick up the transponder again. The track will then be terminated after a specified ...


8

According to this CNN article the FAA revoked their licences with a letter containing the following reasons (emphasis mine): The letter said the pilots were "extremely reckless." "Not only did you not comply with ... [air traffic controller] instructions, you did not even monitor the aircraft's air-ground radios," the letter said. "You were ...


6

The short answer is yes, a commercial pilot can make a decision when to turn. To clarify a few points though, there really isn't such a thing as a "published vector". If a departure procedure with heading were to be published it would then become a Standard Instrument Departure, or SID. True, some SIDs will specify radar vectors, but this simple tells ...


2

The way it works is you file your flight plan for the NAT with a proposed Mach #, but when you get your Oceanic Clearance they will assign Mach #s for each segment of the NAT and that's what you have to fly unless cleared for a different speed. The adherence to assigned Mach #s are the only assurance of separation once out of radar coverage. Perusing the ...


1

The FAA has published an Appendix to the Pilots Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge that gives this example of exiting the runway. Initial Contact After Landing and Clearing the Runway Pilot: Lincoln ground, November 123QY, clear of Runway two at Bravo, taxi to the ramp. Controller: November 123QY, Lincoln ground, taxi to the ramp via Bravo. ...


1

In North America, it's "clear". "Vacated" is used in UK and possibly other places that use UK CAA practices as a basis of their conventions and rules. You will almost never use the phrase at a controlled airport; you pull off the active at the end of the landing roll, and when tower sees you are pulling off onto the taxiway, just tells you to contact ...


1

Nitpick: that would be runway 07, not runway 7 The phraseology is mostly standardised, and in general consists of notifying the relevant unit that you have vacated the runway. At a small, GA airfield with AFIS in the UK the typical communication goes as follows. ATCO: G-ABCD Cleared to land Runway 07, wind 240 at 5 G-ABCD: Cleared to land, Runway 07. G-...


1

I have never heard of any procedures or airways that require a minimum airspeed. Having a minimum climb gradient is quite common, typically on departure procedures to ensure terrain clearance. It generally works out in such a way that aircraft with similar performance tend to cruise at the same levels. Most passenger jets cruising around 30,000-40,000 feet ...


1

Seems you are all wrong. Here is the information you requested that was copied&pasted from the FAA Pilot & Controller Glossary. CLEARED FOR THE OPTION — ATC authorization for an aircraft to make a touch and go, low approach, missed approach, stop and go, or full-stop landing at the discretion of the pilot. It is normally used in training so that an ...


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