Hot answers tagged

43

It just means "pay attention to what you are doing" until you are no longer moving. "Fly them" means "keep actively controlling the plane as if you were still in the air". Don't start daydreaming just because you're on the ground, in other words. Especially with the taildraggers of olden times; They are dynamically unstable turning-wise while rolling ...


19

Ground loops are costly. Fly them until they stop. What this literally says: Ground loops are costly. Fly the ground loops until they stop. What they meant to say: Ground loops are costly. Fly the airplane until it stops. Some background to why this was was important, not an answer to the question really... From personal experience (twice) it is ...


16

It means that even if you've put the wheels on the ground, you still need to "fly" the plane (meaning using control surfaces such as rudder/aileron/elevator) to maintain directional control until you've stopped.


13

What I was taught that this meant was ... ... because they could not communicate with you, but they wanted you to not land on this pass (interval a mess, crossing traffic, winds maybe wrong, a dozen other things that might crop up) it was more or less "the runway will be ready for you if you take another lap in the pattern." This also gives them a bit of ...


9

For one you can not "land on water" you can ditch an aircraft in a body of water but you would be hard pressed to call it a landing. You can however, "land in a grass field" or "land on a runway nearby" or "land on a highway" all of which are substantially more controllable then trying to stall a few feet above the ocean. The result of catching an edge ...


8

My understanding of light gun signals was taught to me a little differently. For simplicity, I will concentrate on light gun signals for airborne aircraft only. Alternating Red and Green is exercise extreme caution. Steady Red is give way to other traffic. Which implies that you should stay in the pattern. But, you are not cleared to land. Steady Green is a ...


6

It is amazing to realize how much aircraft changed from 1920 to 1940, and how difficult it was to properly train people to operate the new ones (all the way to stop). A "ground loop" means exactly what it says, a very sharp turn from your intended path. Your mechanic would not be happy when the cost of damage to struts, wheel bearings, tires, and other ...


5

The answers above are pretty much correct, but it is nice to cite sources. Since the question is relating to studying for a PSTAR and is tagged Canada, first the Canadian sources: Canada Aeronautical Information Manual (Canada) Section 4.2.11 Visual Signals - Aircraft on Ground 4.4.7 Visual Signals - Aircraft in Flight United States The Canadian ...


5

This does exist, and is used by US military aircraft. It's called a Self-contained Approach (SCA) or Independent Precision Radar Approach (IPRA). The primary user of these approaches is Air Force Special Operations Command on aircraft like the MC-130 and AC-130. Regulatory guidance is contained in the AFI 11-202v3 AFSOC Sup, section 7.4, and operational ...


3

Because in most cases landing in the water is no different from landing on concrete. In fact, it could be much worse. I'm not going to talk about the technicalities and physics behind it, but there are loads of reasons why you shouldn't land a plane in the water. For example, the waves are a big threat.. Pilots usually try to land parallel to the waves, ...


3

"maintain directional control until you've stopped." In aviation, a ground loop is a rapid rotation of a fixed-wing aircraft in the horizontal plane (yawing) while on the ground. Aerodynamic forces may cause the advancing wing to rise, which may then cause the other wingtip to touch the ground. In severe cases (particularly if the ground surface is soft),...


3

There are many ways to calculate aircraft performance. Some ways are entirely manual through the use of formulas. Some ways use electronic means like apps and special calculators. Some ways use pre-calculated Tables. Then there are ways that use graphs and charts. Let’s tackle the charts way. First, remember one thing. These charts are made from data ...


2

Can the displaced threshold be used for takeoff? The part of the runway in front of the displaced threshold must not be used for landing (it can be used from the other direction during roll-out), but it may be used for takeoff: Displaced Threshold. A displaced threshold is a threshold located at a point on the runway other than the designated ...


2

GROUND LOOPS ARE EXPENSIVE ie if it gets away from you and enters a ground loop so severe that the aircraft flips and/or strikes a wing into the ground the damage both to the aircraft - and to you - will be very costly. FLY THEM UNTIL THEY STOP - maintain positive control of the aircraft throughout all ground and flight operations. This is particularly ...


2

From an "aviation culture" perspective, "fly it until it stops" is still a phrase taught to student pilots to this day. It means "don't let go of the controls no matter what, act like you are in command of the aircraft until there is no more motion.". In modern times, this is taught in the context of landing in general, especially in emergency landing ...


1

This comes from the Cessna 172R POH and is typical of takeoff and landing performance calculations for all Cessna 172s. First off READ ALL OF THE RELEVANT NOTES IN THE PERFORMANCE SECTION of the AFM as they explain this in detail. But as an example, let’s assume we are departing Gerfield County airport in Rifle, CO (KRIL). It’s a warm spring day in ...


1

Logically it would seem to mean to fly a circuit around the traffic pattern and watch for a steady green light on the next final approach.


1

A simple answer is because you're less likely to drown on land. Open sea normally has waves of at least a meter, so any landing will be a controlled crash with structural damage. Part of the fuselage may be full of water very quickly, and there will be limited time to evacuate everyone, including the injured. Once you're in a life-raft, exposure and ...


1

It's not a huge problem if the wind is not too strong and there is plenty of runway. Ignore perceptions of groundspeed and land normally according to airspeed. I've conducted some experiments that actually tend to result in smoother landings with a tailwind component than with a headwind component; the wind gradient (which tends to increase or maintain the ...


1

The major problem with landing light aircraft, especially tail draggers with no steerable nose wheel,and tailwind component,is the lack of control when roll-out speed drops to that component or below. In fact,below it,control actions reverse! This is often more important than the higher touch-down speed, due to uncontrollable lateral departure from the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible