12

The Lakeland approach you show does not have a FAF (Final Approach Fix) because there is no defined point (fix), where you are established inbound and start to descend. In this case, the FAF is given by the FAP (Final Approach Point): FINAL APPROACH POINT− The point, applicable only to a nonprecision approach with no depicted FAF (such as an on airport VOR),...


5

Your confusion may stem from the way you are viewing the instruction not to use it for arrival on the radials 356 to 157. If you were arriving on the 356 Radial of the PIE VORTAC, your course/track (and/or heading in calm winds) would be 176°. If you were arriving on the 157 Radial of the PIE VORTAC, your course/track (and/or heading in calm winds) would be ...


4

Beginning 2NM prior to reaching the final approach fix of an activated approach, the GPS will smoothly taper down the CDI scale from 1-NM full-scale deflection (from the center) to 0.3-NM at full-deflection over that 2-NM flight distance and reach a scale of 0.3-NM as the final approach fix is reached. AIM Page 1-1-25 "When within 2 NM of the Final ...


3

I have some trouble understanding how the procedure designers take into consideration the traffic flow from neighboring arrival procedures We don't. We only concern ourselves with terrain and obstacle clearance. Doc 8168 Vol. II I-2-1-1 refers. Deconfliction is an ATM responsibility, covered in Doc 4444.


2

[Modifying per Michael Hall's comments] If the question is "do you have to fly the full distance indicated in the hold?", the answer is no. (But if it's just about timing vs. distance then ¯_(ツ)_/¯.) I realize this is old, but since it's currently the top hit on google for the question "do you have to fly the distance shown on a depicted hold&...


2

That would be acceptable to me, but probably more information than you need to give. If you have a transponder, we'll give you a squawk code (and perhaps ask for an ident as well) and radar identify you that way. We will then call "radar contact" and advise where we think you are ("two-eight miles northwest of Podunk VOR"). If you don't ...


2

I generally agree with Dean F's answer regarding the issue of a sharp turn. A turn requiring too much of a heading change might take the aircraft outside of designed protected airspace. However, to be a bit more specific you can refer to the language shown below from FAA Order 8260.3E with respect to your question: An arrival from the north (radial 356, ...


1

Yes, you can do this. As Ralph J says, "You're VFR, Do Whatever". That said, you should understand what you are getting and not getting from this practice. On the Plus side: You are practicing interaction with ATC You are being introduced to a diverse set of procedures On the Minus side: You are practicing use of navigation which is illegal ...


1

In the US, there are no regulations prohibiting you from using an iPad for navigation while flying VFR. There are also no regulations specifying what equipment you must use for a practice approach. The key to this is that it is a practice approach. Therefore, it is flown VFR. Even if you were an IFR-rated pilot in an IFR aircraft under the hood/foggles, your ...


1

I do it all the time. You can fly VFR with any device or no device. A couple of things that I’ve noticed. If you request a VFR practice approach and they approve it, they’ll fit you into the traffic flow just like IFR traffic. They may give you vectors to fit faster traffic into the flow—which is great practice. If you just fly the RNAV and don’t tell them ...


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