24

If you look at satellite imagery it looks like you have very high terrain to the west of the runway. The water would be the primary area available for a climb back to obstacle clearance altitude. Looks like the MAP just routes you with sufficient time to climb to the MA altitude. (Google Maps)


19

Yes, the published sequence must be respected. Here is a quote from published instructions on checklist usage by one of the major manufacturers based in the USA: ". . . . The crew may need to stop a checklist for a short time to do other tasks. If the interruption is short, continue the checklist with the next step. If a pilot is not sure where the ...


13

As Alexander already said in his answer, the turns over water are executed to gain enough altitude before turning back over the terrain. (left: RNAV-A, right: RNAV approach chart). The difference between the RNAV-A approach and the other two (RNAV and LOC) is the required minimum climb gradients for these two approaches. You find them at the bottom of the ...


12

There is some good advice on proper checklist usage in the answers given. Like FAA and civilian aircraft manufacturers, the military preaches disciplined and proper usage of checklists. For the sake of thoughtful discussion, I am going to take a different angle on this and answer NO to the question of the pilot being reprimanded. Read on for explanation...)...


12

I can only speak to the FAA but they expect you to follow the order that checklists are written in as per AC120-71B they also expect checklists to be created in a logical order: 4.2 Organization. 4.2.1 General Organization. Procedures should be organized as simply as possible by order of tasking. Normal procedures are typically organized in sequence by ...


10

On your PC, do you press the power button before it is plugged into the wall? It is written that way because the thing might not work if you do it in the wrong order. Your example of RADAR first and display second...If you do it the other way around, the display may have to be restarted if it sees no input from the radar. I know in ground maintenance, you ...


4

It depends, in some cases there's a specific order that must be followed in order for things to work or for a safety reason. If you look at the checklist for a PA-28 it says (among other things) to run the electric fuel pump, turn it off, prime, then start. This order pressurizes the fuel system, then aspirates fuel into the cylinders so there's something to ...


2

The OCS is the edge of the safe flight 'corridor.' It defines a safe volume of airspace for the approach. Since it's normal to have obstacles off to the side of the approach path the OCS typically rises as you move away from the approach centerline. Your Case 1 is the most correct description of an aircraft flying the approach. The green 'floor' normally ...


1

The PBN manual is the place to start. In Section 5 on departure procedures it includes the following reference: b. Leg type limitations. See Order 8260.46, paragraph 3-1-5 for permissible leg types. Also, all the TERPS requirements also apply, except where modified by the PBN manual. There's usually no one rule that applies universally. It's about ...


1

In terminal areas with relatively low traffic levels, it may be simpler for ATC to let each flight climb or descend at their discretion, with verbal restrictions when an actual conflict appears. There is no point in trying to optimize these procedures because they're already pretty much optimal for the few flights that use them. However, in busy terminal ...


1

There is no definite answer that will fit all manufacturers and projects for the question you're asking. Simply put, the decision to create a scale model or a first prototype depends on what the goal of the creation is, the underlying technology, cost and market interest. A lot of aircraft, either new models or improved variants of already existing models ...


1

This is extracted from the RNAV (GPS) RWY 23 of WESTERN NEBRASKA RGNL/WILLIAM B HEILIG FIELD (BFF) in Scottsbluff, Nebraska. A VDP (Visual Descent Point) is only used in conjunction with an MDA (Minimum Descent Altitude). Do not mistake this for a DA (Decision Altitude). If visual contact with the runway environment is not made once a pilot reaches MDA, the ...


1

The 300 m and 1 000 m tables you found are examples. For the actual radius for any aerodrome elevation you need to apply the formulae. The radius is determined using the formulas in Section 2, Chapter 3, Turn area construction (...) The TAS is based on: a) altitude: aerodrome elevation + 300 m (1 000 ft); and b) temperature: ISA + 15°. First is $R$ (rate ...


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