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17

The real answer is because there is no need. Prior to WW2, both the US Navy and US Army had huge interest in seaplanes for exactly the reason you mentioned: large cargo supply operations. Indeed, it was not only the military who were interested. Commercial civil aviation was also hugely interested in seaplanes. The period in history that saw the success of ...


15

In addition to Jan's answer, to recover the aircraft you need to slow down, nearly stopped. This makes the entire ship group vulnerable. Also, an aircraft carrier can recover aircraft at full speed and have multiple launch/recovery operations running at the same time. Swapping out a flight of aircraft takes minutes. For cargo operations this is called "...


29

Because you can't land a seaplane at high seas anyway. Seaplanes can't handle too big waves. It is said that hitting water at high speed is just like hitting concrete (at somewhat slower, but still quite high speed). The landing has to be gentle for the sea plane to handle it (about similar to landing on the land). But if there are significant waves, the ...


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