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Hammer blow over head is obviously sufficient, like it happened during the Fedex Flight 705. That crew also received the Gold Medal Award for heroism, the highest award a civilian pilot can receive. EA-6B is the four seat aircraft with only one pilot. A rogue deadheading crew member (same as like in the referenced history) looks like a possible situation.


1

Naval aviator Alan Shepard was grounded for at least 6 years due to Ménière's disease.


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Generally, once a person is qualified as a military pilot the service will work pretty hard to bring him back to flying duty after an injury, as it's a rather large investment at that point, except that the "needs of the service" vary over time mostly based on the manning and budget set by Congress. Your character could move to the JAG Corps for ...


5

Are you aware of the TV Series that ran from 1995-2005 called "JAG," which is almost exactly the same as your premise? It was explained in the show opening that: Following in his father's footsteps as a Naval aviator, Lieutenant Commander Harmon Rabb Jr. suffered a crash while landing his Tomcat on a storm-tossed carrier at sea. Diagnosed with ...


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It may be the usual cover-up of major neglicence, such as in the ominous "accident" of Cermis, when the crew of an EA-6B flew too low, cut the cables of a cable car and brought the lives of 20 people to an abrupt halt. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1998_Cavalese_cable_car_crash If your fictious pilot would have not had any recorder on-board, he ...


10

Anything health related could be a reason. Pilots go to for checkups at the doctor at regular intervals. Even the suspicion of a minor heart problem could be one reason. This includes ECG and other tests, the kind of small murmurs we all have has limits as they might be due to leaking valves. Training hard while having lower chest infection (severe cold) ...


14

A bit more exotic incident would be the one that happened to Finnish Air Force test pilots about ten years ago: During a test flight of a "frankenplane" put together of two carcasses of F/A-18's (FAF HN-413 damaged in a previous midair collision and a Canadian front section) to make a functioning F/A-18D (HN-468), a horizontal tail servocylinder ...


16

Glaucoma would do it -- reduces peripheral vision almost immediately (that's often the cause for diagnosis, unless someone is having medical eye exams on the regular like a diabetic would), leads to blindness over time -- but until then, has little effect on central vision (such as you'd use to examine details, shoot, etc.). There are treatments (one of ...


31

Years ago I met a guy with an aerospace supplier I used to deal with in the US, who was a former instructor in the USN in the T-45 Goshawk. I asked him why he quit flying to do what he was doing, and he told me he was in an incident where his student rolled into a turn and pulled high G to avoid something, without any warning, while the instructor was ...


2

The EASA class two requirements are (p.99): (2) For a class 2 medical certificate: (i) Distant visual acuity, with or without correction, shall be 6/12 (0,5) or better in each eye separately and visual acuity with both eyes shall be 6/9 (0,7) or better. (ii) Notwithstanding point (b)(2)(i), applicants with substandard vision in one eye or monocularity may ...


2

EASA Part-MED regulations are non black and white. There is some margin up to the discretion of the AME and Optometrist. If you are outside of the limits, you may be asked to undergo further examinations. Corrections (Spectacles/contact lenses) are allowed and mandatory depending on your non-corrected visual acuity.


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