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It is wise that controllers alert even when the pilot has not declared an emergency. They have to be prepared and start coordination and assessment of the situation because one situation that is not emergent in the air can turn quickly to a distress one. This does not mean that controllers have to block the frequency and ask every moment. The controllers ...


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No, there is no defined height limit to national airspace, but there is an upper speed limit to national airspace, or should we say, an interlock between speed and altitude. Any aircraft that must generate net downlift in order to not gain altitude can be safely to be orbiting rather than flying. And for all practical purposes, all orbital flight is ...


1

You need to file a flight plan for each flight in Namibia, submit a clearance/permit request for your intended route (whole trip) with the Namibian CAA, the clearance number is to be added to your flight plan under item 18, other info, and you need to enter the country via port of entry airports, most practically via Upington to Keetmanshoop. I have just ...


0

In the US the MOCA—Minimum Obstruction Clearance Altitude is 1000' in non-mountainous areas and 2,000' in designated mountainous areas. A map of the areas is contained in 14 CFR PART 95—IFR ALTITUDES. In addition to obstacle clearance the MOCA also ensures reception of VOR signals. Pilots flying off-route e.g GPS direct, are responsible for determining the ...


3

The MOC value you are referring to is related to the en-route phase of an IFR flight, so your statement that it is the lowest altitude a plane can descend to when approaching the runway is wrong. That value depends on the type of approach, aircraft equipment and various other factors. It is not a fixed value shared among different airports. You probably have ...


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