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2

Large airliners don't fly at slower speeds. It's simple economics. If you have to connect two destinations 10,000 miles apart, you'll do maybe 2 round trips a week. Your passengers have no other choice, except a flight that takes even longer. You also have the luxury of flying between two very large cities. If you have to connect two destinations 100 ...


1

Low frequencies are attenuated less over distance and by obstacles. The lower frequencies, even from the music from a dance hall or band, or that car near you playing loud music will be heard first. It may be all you hear! It is also common that as we get older, and especially those in aviation, we become high tone deaf!!


3

The air attenuates high frequencies more than it does low. Thus, lower frequency sounds travel farther, so you hear them first. Also, longer wavelengths will appear to "bend" around obstacles more than ones with shorter wavelengths, so buildings around you will in many cases develop acoustic "shadow" zones for higher frequencies as those buildings' ...


0

If you live in the approach path to a big airport, then there will be thumps and muffled booms as the landing gear is extended. It could be this that you are hearing.


5

Not all modern aircraft have windows that can be opened. The Boeing 747 for example does not. On the Boeing 737, the windows can be opened for two reasons: Emergency Evacuation: When the aircraft needs to be evacuated, there is always a way to escape from the flight deck without going through the cabin. On the Boeing 737, this is accomplished through the ...


27

The airliner in the picture is a Vickers VC.1 Viking, registration LV-AFI, of the former Argentinian operator Flota Aérea Mercante Argentina. According to this source, the plane served the Secretaría de Aeronáutica under registration LV-XFJ for less than a month, from 10.9.1947 till 4.10.1947 before transferring to FAMA. After FAMA, the plane in question ...


7

The answer to your question is, in fact, "yes" - but the circumstances involved demonstrate just how difficult it is to make an aircraft's landing gear deploy without being commanded to do so. In 1985, CI006, a 747SP, experienced an uncommanded flameout of its #4 (right outboard) engine (something that particular engine was quite prone to doing) while ...


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