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1

2000 miles with a piston engine has been done more recently - check Wikipedia's entry for the AAI Aerosonde, which crossed the Atlantic (2031 miles) burning only 1.5 US gallons of fuel. It includes a reference to the later "Spirit of Butts' Farm" which did that as well with a total gross weight of 11 pounds / 5 kilograms. Autopilots are far more capable and ...


2

This is perhaps not going to be a very good answer to the specific question, but the mission you describe would constitute some out-of-the-box thinking. As John K already suggested, a very light construction, perhaps in the spirit of Rutan Voyager suggested by Jamesqf would be a good starting point. Large wingspan to get efficient wings would give the ...


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The main distance limitation for a plane is weight: every extra pound of fuel means one less pound of payload. Planes can be equipped with "ferry tanks" that increase endurance for long open water legs, but then they're bumping up against (or even over) maximum gross weight with just the pilot (no passengers or cargo). Take the pilot out and you can add more ...


3

Your best bet would be an airplane/drone that is built from carbon composite and graphlite rod (pull-truded carbon rod with incredible strength - widely used in sailplane spars) powered by a couple of aviation diesels like the Austro Engine E4. The Specific Fuel Consumption of the E4 is .336 lbs/hp/hr. Except for similar competing diesels, nothing in any ...


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It's perfectly possible to build piston-engined planes with ranges of 2000 miles or more, for instance many WWII planes like the B-17 and B-29, pre-jet airliners like the Lockheed Constellation, or the Rutan Voyager. The reason there are few, if any, in service today is that there is no real market. Jets have taken the long-range commercial market, and ...


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I implemented a program using Matlab for S.C calculus purposes (I'm actually involved in an aircraft project and, fortunately (or not), I'm the structures guy. I have based the code and the theory in a PDF bibliography that is linked w/ the .zip folder. You'll notice two matlab codes: -One is named "Load_Airfoil_Coordinates_using_MATLAB.m". It loads any ....


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