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It's not guaranteed that the missile/bomb will stay upright relative to an asymmetrical wing throughout its whole flight, and if it were to wind up inverted, the range would be shorter and the package would fall short of its target. That might mean on civilians or friendly forces, and that's not good. Asymmetrical airfoils are effective, and they get the job ...


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Most missiles fly at such high speeds and manoeuvre so violently that "up" means very little to them, it is simply a mild error to be corrected for. Cruciform wings and tails are designed solely for manoeuvrability in whatever direction the missile needs at that moment. After a bit of that, there is no predicting which way up the missile will be by ...


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Assymetrical wings on missiles/guided bombs do exist. However the goal of all missiles/guided bombs is to hit or come close to its target, which mean different things for various missiles. This drives their design: Symmetrical airfoils on missiles are used in order to guarantee uniform turning capability. This enables the missile to immediately turn in ...


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Disclaimer: I am not familiar with the Adafruit software. My experience is more related to the filter software by Sebastian Madgwick. MEMS gyros are poor in comparison with state-of-the-art fiber gyros which shows in their level of noise and bias. The result is drift: Random walk from noise plus a steadily increasing error from the integration of the ...


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The problem As already pointed out in some of the comments, this is a structural problem of using an IMU-only AHRS unit. This unit cannot distinguish between acceleration due to centrifugal force, and acceleration of the earth. For example imagine that you fly level, and then roll into a coordinated turn. The short-term roll-rotation will be picked up by the ...


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This one is dependent upon the control surface failure and recommended procedures from the manufacture. If the aircraft is equipped with a ballistic parachute system, the system may be activated if the pilot feels that the aircraft has departed from controlled flight with no ability on their part to regain control and recover. Typically aircraft equipped ...


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If a major flight control surface fails in flight, you'll be lucky if the ballistic parachute can save you. An aileron, for instance, that goes "hard over", will put even the most docile training aircraft into a tight spiral or a roll that will quickly become a spin (because the airplane doesn't have enough speed for a complete roll and will stall)...


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