New answers tagged

0

I can see what you're getting at, your point is essentially, if a pilot deflected the rudder to its fullest extent, is there a minimum airspeed at which it could be overcome by aileron or spoileron control? But I seriously doubt that aircraft manufacturers test this phenomena, in any event I have never come across the term in 38 years of aviation. A hard ...


0

Pull the nose up, take out a pencil and hold it in front of your face, and then let go of it and keep it floating in front of your face by judicious use of the throttle and stick (yoke). Obviously, you will end up in a dive, and airspeed will increase dramatically. If you approach Vne, or if the throttle reaches idle to keep the pencil from moving forward in ...


0

Well, it would be hard to put it anywhere else! The pilots are used to flying this way. Most captains and left-seat pilots use their right hand on the throttle and left on the yoke or stick during takeoff. The force on these flight controls is minimal, so there's no need to use your dominant hand to fly the plane.


0

Yep! Not all of them do, but a good many of them. Off the top of my head I can think of the F-16, F/A-18, F-22, and F-35. They're referred to as elevons.


3

(Charles Bretana's answer provides direct evidence. This answer adds historical context.) Other fighters use differential elevator to cause roll, F/A-18, F-100, F-15, but not F-4: F-4 pilots were trained to use the rudder to roll the aircraft at higher AOA. Instructors were trained to emphasize this flight characteristic, and, whenever at high AOA, to keep ...


6

No, the two sides of the Stabilator are connected to one another and move in unison. The following is from the USAF F-4E flight manual, page 1-21.


0

No. The only movement I saw out of the tail when crews checked controls was both sides in unison,for rolling will definitely use rudder at higher AOA.


5

I think you misunderstand what the purpose of trim is, which is to change the attitude of static stability. The yoke (or stick) is the primary flight control. Virtually all changes in attitude will originate here, and any temporary changes also end here. If you take your hand off, the plane returns to the original attitude. When you want to make a permanent ...


2

The advantage of NOT having the trim controls on the yoke is that its far simpler, mechanically. For instance the elevator trim on a Piper Cherokee is basically just a wheel attached to a cable running straight back to the trim tab. Imagine the Rube Goldberg design that'd be needed to put it on both control yokes. (Of course if you have more complex "...


1

I think I see how the elevon controls are designed. The pulleys by the pilot's waist look independent, except for being connected to the sides of the "pillow" the pilot rests his torso on. So that creates linkage between controls for side-to-side or forward-backward movement. The pilot moving his body (and thus the pillow) left or right will pull ...


0

In an aeroplane with hydraulically powered, irreversible flight controls, the controls are very hard to move with no hydraulic pressure. The controls have a bit of movement around the servo valve travel, a couple of centimeters at the stick. The unpowered hydraulic actuator acts as a damper, and the pilot must exert quite a bit of force to deflect the stick ...


5

Su-15 (as well as all Sukhoi interceptors since Su-7) had a completely irreversible control system with no manual override. This means, 100% of torque was produced by hydraulic boosters, and the force on the control stick was simulated with a special variable spring loading mechanism. So, a theoretical total hydraulic failure would result in loss of control, ...


1

If you want to include radio-controlled model airplanes as "aircraft", then the answer is that yes, there have been some single-stick transmitters that use twisting of the stick to control the rudder channel.


4

The Kitplanes article suggests that the pilot's left-right (and fore-and-aft?) body movements shift the small platform or cradle that he is lying on, which pull on the control cables that actuate the ailerons or elevons, whichever they are. No joysticks appear to be involved. We lack an authoritative answer as to whether pitch control is primarily/ ...


6

This is the M-02J, a jet plane modeled after the Mehve "glider" (actually a futuristic antigravity plane) from "NausicaƤ of the Valley of the Wind". And, yes, the pilot controls pitch primarily by shifting his weight forward and back, while the ailerons are only used for roll control. You can control any airplane through weight shift, ...


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