New answers tagged

1

No. I f you launch it so fast that lift is greater than weight, if will pitch up, and may either stall (as happened to me with my foam plane) or may enter a phugoid cycle where it climbs, dives, climbs again, and so on. But if you launch it at the right speed and right angle (usually slightly down) it will fly smoothly to a gentle touchdown far away. By ...


1

Can aileron differential completely eliminate adverse yaw? Absolutely. All you need to do is have the amount of aileron differential be controlled by a computerized fly-by-wire system that continually tailors the amount of differential to whatever part of the flight envelope (airspeed, G-loading, angle-of-attack) the aircraft is operating it, so that the ...


9

That depends on flight speed. Adverse yaw is strongest at low speed. A high-aspect ratio configuration will not be able to avoid adverse yaw, regardless of the degree of aileron differential. At high speed the same airplane might roll fine without rudder corrections, because then aileron differential will be able to compensate for the then low adverse yaw if ...


4

Based on my experience (seeing, not flying) with radio control models, no, not completely. I have seen "drag buckets" added to ailerons, as well as coupled spoilers, which can come close, but there are large efficiency penalties for drag buckets, and added complexity and weight for coupled spoilers. Coupled split aileron "drag rudder" ...


1

According to airvectors.net, the flight controls of the SEPECAT Jaguar are: The Jaguar A had a high-mounted wing with a sweep of 40 degrees and an anhedral droop of 3 degrees, with relatively small wing area for a smoother ride at low altitude. There was a leading-edge flap along the outboard section of each wing, and large, double slotted trailing edge ...


0

Basically during RAT extension blue hydraulic system is not powered which operates blue ACTR of elevator which is controlled by ELAC#1. To avoid control confusion ELAC#2 straight away given as no go to give pitch control during this transit RAT extension phase.


0

Regarding your first question The angle of attack is the angle between the chord line of the airfoil and the relative airflow, that's first and foremost. There is a longitudinal datum that could be what you are referring to as the "aircraft's forward unit vector" but that longitudinal datum shouldn't be measured directly to the velocity vector in ...


3

My question is this really true,why airflow dont separate from wing at high AoA and cause reduction in lift and sudden drop in altitude when pull yoke as fast you could? I will try to answer this explicitely stated question in more generic terms. As already mentioned, a wing will stall when AoA increases above particular value. This is true regardless ...


3

I have 500 hours in one, more or less... This one: In my experience, if –with the engine at cruise, say 2/3 power– you start pulling the stick slowly, the machine does obediently pitch up, with no stall, but one has to be careful, and fast with the pedals. At the extreme, the airplane is pointing more or less to the zenith, and starts falling tail first ...


0

The failure of an engine in a multi engine aircraft causes it to yaw towards the failed engine. To counter this, the pilot has to apply the rudder towards the live engine. This is all great as the rudder itself can keep the aircraft balanced. Even though the aircraft looks balanced with the rudder alone, the application of the rudder puts the aircraft in a ...


1

Gordon Galow the original designer of the helicopter for the US army now 98 years old said it was for the lift. Even at the small percentage angle of the blade it provided some lift. One of the most important components of a helicopters design was it's lift capability. Having in the 1960's spent time trying to develop a replacement for the Skycrane he ...


Top 50 recent answers are included