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The rules are different in different countries. In some countries the aircraft gets its registration, and keeps it forever (the registration may be suspended if the aircraft transfers to a different country, but will regain its original registration on return). In some countries you cannot choose the registration, the authorities do that. In some ...


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Aside from ownership changes, tail number change is very rare: The cost to change the tail number with the same national registry, on the aircraft itself and in the maintenance logs plus the cost of the aircraft being out of service for some time will far outweigh any minor cosmetic benefits. The only reason I can think of is changing the registration to a ...


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The most common time for a tail number to change would be when an aircraft changes ownership. However, if the airplane is staying in the same country, it may not be worth the paperwork to change. Some examples include US Airways aircraft like N167US retaining their registration with American, and AirTran aircraft like N937AT retaining their registration with ...


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I was under the false impression that tail numbers don't change Tail numbers (AKA registrations) are changeable by definition since each country is allocated codes with different prefixes and formats. If an operator from country X buys an aircraft from an operator in country Y, then the tail number must will most of the time be changed to a valid tail ...


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I Have found out this Mitsubishi pushback tug in real life at Haneda airport, Tokyo. but I wasn't able to get the original model number but I belive Mitsubishi hasn't set one for it otherwise the TOMICA toy co. would have named it as the other toys. This pushback tug was only associated to pushback the B747 only, since all the photos the tug was with B747 ...


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I was so close. I was looking at the de Havilland Otter but a mid 50s. A friend finally found it. It is a mid 70s DH-114 de Havilland Riley. Thank you verandaguy for leading to the de Havilland. That was most helpful. Now I can finish the Xmas present and be able to tell my Father-in-law the exact type of plane it came from. Cheers.


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It's a joke. It was first posted – at least as far back as 2001 – on skyhawk.org with the caption: The Royal Australian Navy Skyhawk, being an all-purpose aircraft, was the subject of a 1970s experimental sea trial of an A-4 on board a Royal Australian Navy submarine. There was no objection from the aviators to operating the Skyhawk from the somewhat ...


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Spy planes!!! Looks like I found an answer after two years when I came across a blog called 'secret bases'. "Keen MI5 spy plane spotters should continue to lurk around RAF Northolt. A company formed by former elite RAF pilots, 2 Excel Aviation, actually based at Sywell Aerodrome, Northamptonshire, is now performing those spooky Northolt tasks, as part of ...


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It looks like a 1921 Blackburn Dart, British carrier-based torpedo bomber biplane. (source)


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