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It Looks like avro 504K,see this picture


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The international distress frequency has been 500 kHz, since 1908. Copious details are at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/500_kHz. During the war, this frequency was used for reporting distress and for monitoring distress, by the Germans and the British. It was also used before and after the war for this purpose, by many countries, by aviators and mariners ...


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Material: You cannot build today's paragliders without modern materials The ropes need to withstand several kN of force while keeping diameter to a minimum to reduce drag. The glider must be almost impenetrable for pressurized air, which is impossible with cotton. If you build a paraglider with classic materials, it will be too heavy to fly and way too ...


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An airfoil made only of textiles consists of many air cells which are open at their leading edge. "it's easy to make an airfoil from only strings and textiles and make a parachute", is perhaps not so easy! it's non-obvious idea which is complex in design. The first guy to fly a parachute thought of it when he wanted to escape his jail cell. after he was ...


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Ancient manned flights used either "birdman" wings or kites. Nobody even understood the problem of control, never mind solved it, and both were often fatal, birdman wings especially. That did not change until in the first part of the 19th century Sir George Cayley defined control as a specific problem to be solved, and that would take almost a hundred years ...


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Paragliders as we know them depend on parawings with relatively high glide ratios and useful levels of steering. Neither of these qualities were well represented in the round parachutes (even the so-called glide 'chutes) in common use before modern flat canopy glide parachutes came along (in the 1970s?). Parawings as we know them were an outgrowth of these ...


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It's possible that the soviet attitude indicators are subject to tumble when operated inverted. the easy way to overcome this is to provide two instruments, one of which does not tumble when flying mostly right-side up and the other does the same for flying upside-down. Soviet-era acrobatic planes had dual G-meters installed for this same reason. One was ...


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Many of the modern military aircraft I have seen have two Attitude Indicators for redundancy. Although, one may be in the HUD. GA aircraft with glass panels certified for IFR also have two for the same reason.


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According to this CNN article, the record has been broken because of the COVID-19 outbreak: On March 14, French airline Air Tahiti Nui flew the longest ever scheduled passenger flight by distance -- transiting 9,765 miles across the world from Papeete, in Tahiti, French Polynesia, to Paris' Charles de Gaulle airport. This one off milestone was a ...


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While it's uncommon, it appears that many pushback tugs are specifically designed to fit underneath an aircraft like this. This wiki notes that (emphasis mine) Pushback tractors use a low profile design to fit under the aircraft nose. For sufficient traction, the tractor must be heavy, and most models can have extra ballast added. A typical tractor for ...


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Yes, this is a perfectly normal practice, still used, especially for tight spaces, as seen in this video moving a 747 into the hangar for service. And no, it doesn't require any special equipment - the nose gear attachment is designed to be used either way. A still from the video:


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There are a few things that can happen: They are sold to another airline - In some cases the plane may still have life (cycles) left and may find it's later days flying for another outfit. Sometimes airlines for countries with emerging economies can only afford older aircraft and they may end up far from their original homes. They are sold to cargo ...


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