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2

Hindenburg disaster may be a candidate. This fire firmly ended the era of the Zeppelins and other great airships filled up with hydrogen that were flying transatlantic routes at that time. Helium filled airships, even if much less flammable, somehow shared the decline as well. The aviation needed to switching into very different fixed wing aircraft, using ...


2

The results of a trial made on November 21, 1903, do not match the 1999 wind tunnel measurements. The discrepancy is enormous. The Wright brothers and the people at NASA tested very different planes and propellers otherwise the reported experimental data would have matched well. I do not agree the 1999 experiments, on the full size model of the 1903 plane, ...


1

1. I have found this article: The Wilmington Messenger, Wilmington, North Carolina, May 26, 1904, col. 1, p. 6. Elizabeth City Economist: A gentleman visiting this city whose home is in Kitty Hawk, is responsible for the assertion that the Wright brothers, of airship fame, will return to Kitty Hawk in the near future and resume work on their aerial monster. ...


7

Crisis is somewhat hard to define explicitly but the September 11th Attacks had an enormous impact on the commercial aviation industry in perhaps more ways than the current Pandemic has. It took nearly 3 years for aviation travel numbers to return after the attacks and arguably we are still seeing lasting impacts on changes to broad aviation travel ...


8

The aircraft is one of many (5 or 6) SAML-Aviatik type "S" and type "A" Italians that flew in Argentina in the '20s. All were for civilian use. Most had Colombo or FIAT engines in line, but the one in the photo (type "A") was the only with a rotary engine (Le Rhone?) that flew in Argentina. It belonged to the Italian pilot ...


1

The upper wing of the Fokker Dr.I is larger in span and chord than the other two. Adding ailerons on the lower wings would had added less effect for additional mechanical complexity, and on the lower wing they would be subject to damage upon ground contact. I know that it is hard to argue here that ailerons must be protected from ground contact, but this ...


0

In an aeroplane with hydraulically powered, irreversible flight controls, the controls are very hard to move with no hydraulic pressure. The controls have a bit of movement around the servo valve travel, a couple of centimeters at the stick. The unpowered hydraulic actuator acts as a damper, and the pilot must exert quite a bit of force to deflect the stick ...


5

Su-15 (as well as all Sukhoi interceptors since Su-7) had a completely irreversible control system with no manual override. This means, 100% of torque was produced by hydraulic boosters, and the force on the control stick was simulated with a special variable spring loading mechanism. So, a theoretical total hydraulic failure would result in loss of control, ...


0

What W. Wright describes in his two letters to G. A. Spratt is pure fiction, imaginary flights. Using the zero lift drag coefficient taken from the lift and drag diagram of the Wright 1903 machine (a valid approximation as Flyer I and II were quite similar) and also the technical characteristics of Flyer II as it was before September 10, 1904, (without ...


7

Yes, and it occurs with nearly every airplane there is. It is caused by lift-induced drag. Lift is created by a wing deflecting airflow downward, itself being pushed upward as a result. (Newton's third law) Lift-induced drag is the backward component of the resulting reaction force acting on a wing. Since at lower speed, the wing needs to be tilted up more ...


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