New answers tagged

5

I can tell you my experience during my stay in Zaragoza Air Base in northeastern Spain, in 1998. After heavy maintenance work, the twin-seater was ready to fly. In order to check all work done, we did a parabolic flight in clean configuration (no loads under wings or fuselage). It was a flight test so we decided to push the limits a little and see the real ...


6

Yes, this device would produce some thrust. If oriented properly, this thrust could be used to lift a weight. But it would be extremely inefficient when compared to a standard airfoil, such as a wing or helicopter blade. What you've basically created is a centrifugal pump without a case. Air would enter the "front" of the device (assuming the motor ...


2

There are reasons why a Hornet would NOT go above its 50,000 feet service ceiling. Has it been done in testing? Probably. Has it happened accidentally? Probably. But there’s no reason to do so. Aircraft performance is pretty bad at the service ceiling, so BFM/ACM isn’t going to go well. Turn performance and speed will be very negatively impacted. Dropping ...


8

It is a Cessna 188 crop duster. The giveaway is the shape of the cooling air inlets on either side of the prop, which are "Cessna-shaped", as opposed to those on the similar Piper Pawnee which are rounded.


4

The behavior of Clement Ader's 1897 plane represents strong evidence against any flight performed by the same inventor in 1890 and 1891 using similar machines. The Oct. 21, 1897 report, made by general Mensier, and its annex of Oct. 27 do not leave room for interpretation. The 1897 airplane never left the ground with its front wheels during the Oct. 12 and ...


3

The ancestor of airplanes was Éole. ("L’Aïeul des Avions fut l’Éole." - Clement Ader) In December 1906, when it was already demonstrated in front of official witnesses, that the man carrying planes can take off and fly, Clement Ader wrote a book, published in 1907, in which he established himself as the father of aviation. He claims flights for all ...


1

It is generally accepted by aviation historians that during a test at 9 October 1890 the wheels of Ader's machine briefly left the ground just barely and came back down 50 meters away. Later claims which Ader made in a book Military Aviation (Ader, Clément, "La première étape de l'aviation militaire en France", Paris, J. Bosc et Cie, 1907) ...


3

To understand what is going on here you need to know that John Stringfellow together with William Henson wanted to build a passenger airplane and place it into commercial service. They had drawn up plans and patented it in 1842. They tried to recruit investors. The idea of the Aerial Steam Carriage and the publicity campaign depicting the airplane in faraway ...


5

I was not able to discover articles of 1848, or even up to 5 years after, that give details about the 1848 flight of Stringfellow's model. However, I found 3 first hand articles, published on July 3, 24 and Oct. 9, 1868, which say that, at an exhibition which took place starting with June 25, 1868, at the Crystal Palace in London, John Stringfellow exhibited ...


5

The aviation enthusiasts to whom this letter was address in 1905 would have understood the Wright brothers to be referring primarily to special light-weigh steam engines specifically designed for use in aircraft. Enthusiasts had been building such engines since at least the 1840’s and by the 1870's you could have one built for you if you could afford it. The ...


2

Stringfellow never built a manned machine, or even a successful model. The Scientific American piece mistakes a model with wingspan 10 feet for a manned machine. In 1848 Stringfellow launched it from an overhead wire into a 30 yard powered glide. In his Early Flying Machines, historian Charles Gibbs-Smith notes that it "almost flew". The London ...


4

First, I would like to mention a free book, that I skimmed a few days ago, which reached the conclusion that the Wrights committed one of the greatest technical frauds of the twentieth century. The text concentrates on the 105 flights of 1904. The work is based only on primary sources, mainly documents of the period 1903-1905, in majority letters of the two ...


4

Since June 2011. EASA first proposed a change to CS 25.1322 in NPA 2009-12 (Notice of Proposed Amendment) in November 2009: CS-25 contains a certification specification (CS 25.1322) that dictates the colour of warning, caution, advisory, and other message lights that are installed as annunciation displays in the flight deck. As presently written, CS 25.1322 ...


10

50 years before, in 1855, not even the Lenoir engine, a two-stroke combustion engine which ran on natural gas (saving Lenoir from inventing the carburettor after having invented the spark plug already) had been invented yet. This only leaves steam or compressed air engines - ignition engines needed inventions which only occurred in (induction coil by ...


Top 50 recent answers are included