New answers tagged

2

There is another reason, sort of a lost art among modern aircraft designers: to balance vertical and lateral drag. Early aircraft flew at much slower airspeeds, making them far more susceptible to cross wind gusts. Large forward set wheels underneath and in front of the fuselage helped balance side wind drag forces on the vertical tail, while cleverly ...


7

The biplane and tailwheel configurations are not directly related, but are both symptoms of the historical quest for light weight. Given a rather inefficient engine in the 70-150 hp class, lifting both pilot and any kind of payload is a challenge. All-up weight must be severely limited. The biplane is more structurally efficient or, to put it the other way, ...


16

It is a bit more than a coincidence. You might also ask why there are so few biplanes with retractable landing gear. The reason is similar. Biplanes are propeller-driven (except for this one), and in almost all cases the propeller is in the front. Efficient propellers are large and require a longer landing gear when a tricycle gear is used. Granted, the ...


7

As you suspected, this in an evolutionary coincidence. As construction methods and materials improved, multiple stacked wings became obsolete being less efficient to otherwise comparable single wing design. When biplanes were extinct, by chance the tricycle gear arrangement started its "triumph". These two are separate advancements in engineering. ...


3

In older A320s, the alternate braking system unlike the normal braking is not computer controlled. The alternate braking is controlled by auxiliary LP pressure distribution lines and is entirely mechanical. When you press the brakes with normal braking unavailable, pressure is sent by the hydraulic lines which closes off the automatic selector valve and ...


8

While it’s not a true air to air fighter, following are some comparison numbers for the EA-6B Prowler that might help provide a useful ratio for a tactical "fighter type" aircraft. (Information comes from the NATOPS pocket checklist, under the constant altitude “bingo” fuel divert tables.) Theses figures are for a flaps-up aircraft, fully loaded ...


0

It is doubtful whether you will find any data beyond "a lot". This is the reason for retracting the gear whenever possible. A while ago an Airbus A320 was unable to retract the gear. The pilots didn't find specific data in their manuals. The additional fuel use resulted in the plane never flying again. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hapag-...


Top 50 recent answers are included