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2

In actual practice you will find it easier to quickly perceive any deviation (drifting) toward the left or right edge of the runway if you positon the aircraft so that the runway centerline goes right under your seat. So that you are essentially "sitting on" the centerline. This makes the runway centerline appear to project perfectly forward in your vision,...


1

It is very rare to take off in perfectly calm conditions (wind can add or subtract from "left turning forces"). Rudder inputs are added on a "as needed" basis by the pilot, usually in small increments. Taking an hour at a local airport in a 172 may be your best answer. Keep in mind, with side by side seating, your eyes are slightly off the centerline when ...


0

I cannot talk about the realism in flight simulator these days, I haven't used it since I became a pilot many years ago. From my experience back then I found that ground handling was one of the least realistic aspects of the experience compared to the real thing, so I wouldn't worry too much about that aspect. Keeping on centerline is a matter of ...


8

Is this common in real life flying? Are actual pilots consistently able to align the nose wheel to the runway centreline during takeoff in such single engine propeller plane or am I being too idealistic? In my experience flying primarily light singles its not terribly difficult to stay aligned on the centerline during takeoff. Even my first solo was ...


5

A "fully-stalled take-off" is an attempted takeoff where the elevator has too much authority. This can cause the aircraft to rotate to an excessive nose up attitude, which can exceed the stall angle of attack, before takeoff speed is attained. Ventral fins were added to some B707s to improve lateral stability, and prevent over-rotation. Over rotation which ...


1

It all depends on what the individual knows about flying in general and the aircraft type specifically. There are stories of ground crew getting airborne, but although unlicensed/unqualified, they typically have familiarity with the type, and may even have operational experience starting/taxiing (e.g. the F-86 incident cited by fooot). An individual having ...


5

I haven't flown for many years, but I remember my first experience was the surprise at how easy it was. A small plane, say a Cessna 152, will practically fly itself; it feels like it wants to get off the ground. 90% of what one has to learn to take-off is running through check lists, doing safety checks, getting the weather forecast, plotting the course, ...


3

This sort of scenario happens from time to time. Before a flight the crew will calculate the flap setting and speed at which the aircraft rotates based on aircraft weight, the weather conditions, and runway length. If any of these are entered incorrectly, the aircraft could rotate too soon and not lift off when expected. To decrease wear on the engines, ...


3

A few years ago in Danbury, CT, an untrained man stole a single engine plane and flew it south to Westchester County Airport, a mid-sized airport just north of NYC He landed it successfully and was pomptly arrested. He was also drunk. As for taking off at an airport like SFO without clearance, the only thing preventing that is fear of death.


6

I'd say that it completely depends on the type of airplane. Given enough surface and no obstacles in front of the airplane, then most airplanes wouldn't be difficult to get off the ground if you figured out how to add power and that more speed will make you fly. On the ground, steering with your feet might be weird at first, but pretty much anyone can figure ...


4

If I take the question title at face value, then my answer is yes, it is possible to take off. As an untrained civilian, I've had the opportunity to hop into a few military flight simulators; and given sufficient runway, simply applying max MIL thrust in a modern fighter will have you lifting off (eventually) without too much effort if you can identify the ...


3

Yes, I did on my first (and only) flight lesson which I was gifted for my birthday. The instructor let me take full control on take-off (he was hands-off from his controls) and I performed the landing myself. Both from/to the main runway at Bournemouth International. I was definitely an amateur and only 13 at the time!


11

The first thing I would do is advance thrust to maximum available thrust, make sure both engines are indeed operating. Next I'd check is if the speedbrake is stowed. I would not consider retracting flaps because when you are too slow to climb you are definitely too slow to retract flaps... could be deadly. Normally this kind of situation can't happen ...


-1

Anyone who isn't employed as a pilot is by definition an amateur. A very large number of people who fall in that category is either a pilot license holder or is (or has in the past) trained to become one. All of those people can take off in an aircraft. And especially in the past many people did take off in aircraft without ever having had any training at ...


3

As an addendum on that MST3K episode, has it happened before? Yes on numerous occasions as the previous posts stated. Some of these ad hoc flights ended safely, some didn’t. As to whether someone could have stolen a GA aircraft from an FBO at KSFO, yes it’s quite feasible if the owner was careless and left it unlocked with the keys in it. Ramps were ...


40

The Aviation Safety Network has an article listing 11 airplanes that crashed after being stolen by a non-pilot. The most recent was the Horizon Air Dash 8 that was stolen by a ground service agent in August 2018. There are more interesting stories such as: The guy that tried to crash a Cessna 150 into the White House (with minimal experience and training) ...


7

If you consider a disgruntled and/ or imbalanced airline employee as falling within the scope of your question, then a recent event in Washington state gives you your answer. Except that you specify no simulator practice. "Could they" may be speculative but I suppose a flight instructor could answer whether an unpracticed novice has ever successfully ...


5

As Ron points out in the comments the question is not so much where as it is when. Aircrafts see the density altitude of the air around it not the true altitude they are at. On a very hot day at a very high altitude airport the density altitude may very well be higher than the true altitude by a significant amount which affects takeoff performance. The FAA ...


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