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4

Without knowing more about what you are designing it is impossible to come up with a specific number. But there are a number of factors that you should take into account: the lower the thrust to weight ratio, the longer it will take to accelerate, so the longer the required runway will be. During the take-off roll the lift can usually be neglected, but the ...


1

Specific to the LC-130.’ After ATO ignition but prior to flying speed, a reject is performed by retarding the throttles to the ground range. If you can reach a flying air speed - you typically are not using ATO - unless the terrain is such that warrants a shorter slide to protect the airplane from higher risk. The bottles burn, based on pressure altitude and ...


11

The used acronyms are defined in the Jeppesen charts legend: CL Centerline Lights RCLM Runway Center Line Markings RL Runway (edge) Lights RVR Runway Visual Range The first column tells us that a takeoff is authorized with RVR in touchdown zone (TDZ), midfield (MID) and rollout (RO) of at least 150m, if the RL and CL are operational (except during snow, ...


19

When the FLAP/SLAT handle is in the 0° to 13° range, the slats are in the mid-sealed position. The slats will be in the extended position whenever the FLAP/SLAT is in the 15° to 40° range. The range between 13° and 15° is the DO NOT USE range.[1] Given the above and the analogue nature of the input (dial-a-flap), between 13 and 15° the slats are very likely ...


4

If it happens at a slower speed as you ask, then maneuvering the plane on the runway as it stops would help, even if it's only a 45-degree turn. You might wonder why not do a complete 180 if the runway width allows; that turn is slow and takes valuable time, while a fully loaded plane can theoretically be evacuated in under 90 seconds with only half the ...


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