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3

The potential for savings is not there. Most of the fuel spent on climbing is not wasted. It's recouped back in the descent, which is performed at very low thrust. An aircraft's combination of kinetic and potential energy is a perfect energy storage system. The only major losses of energy added by the climb-descent cycle are those from the added friction ...


5

This doesn't just happen, it is a situation that develops. That developing situation will be watched closely by ATC, who will communicate with the approaching aircraft. "Its speed was mini" Note how the approaching aircraft can hear ATC trying to talk the A318 off the runway. Also notice how they call "go-around" (...


0

This recording from Prague airport captures similar situation as you described - El Al took too long to takeoff and separation with CSA on final could no longer be guaranteed. ATC cancelled the takeoff for El Al and ordered the CSA to go around.


2

It can happen at uncontrolled (no ATC tower) as well (which are the vast majority of airports in the US). Initial reaction is to apply power to help with a climb and then start "cleaning up" the airframe - retracting landing gear (if so equipped), start flaps retraction (and slats, etc) and continue climbing. At some point, make an announcement on CTAF ("...


5

The air traffic controller will instruct the landing aircraft to perform a go-around. It is part of the air traffic controller's job to ensure there is always enough spacing between a departing aircraft and a landing aircraft to accomodate such a situtation. A situation similar to what you describe is in this youtube video: ...


8

one plane is trying to take off at the end of the runway and other plane trying to land from the other end of the runway That would never happen. Planes are under ATC control from the moment they start their engines until the moment thay shut down their engines at the destination. (This is a simplification, but for the context of this question it makes ...


25

ATC will tell the landing plane to go-around. The pilot will then execute the go-around by flying the missed approach procedure as published in the airport charts. Go-arounds happen daily and are pretty much a routine action. In any case, if the landing pilot feels that the runway is not safe for landing, he can decide to go-around by himself without ATC ...


4

Flight range would be limited Aircraft would not be able to take off with full fuel, because of the difficulty of taking off in the high altitude. In fact some planes could not take off at all at max weight, not even with unlimited runway, because with a full fuel load they are at "coffin corner" at that altitude, and incapable of (safely) attaining the ...


17

These are the main challenges I can think of: High takeoff and landing speed: To generate enough lift for takeoff in the thinner air at FL300 (gravity has almost not decreased, so required lift stays almost the same), very high speeds are required. Combine this with less thrust from the engines available and you need very long runways. It should still be ...


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