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1

Zero fuel weight has to do with wing flex limitations, it is the weight of everything except the fuel, which is contained in the wings as well as the center (fuselage) tanks. If the zero fuel weight is too high, once the fuel is used, the wing flex might put a lot of strain on the spars. Imagine a model airplane being suspended by strings through the center ...


1

If you know how much fuel you'll need for the flight, then the things that can limit your load (which is really what you're interested in -- how much weight can I put on the airplane today, in terms of passengers + cargo) are: Empty weight + Payload (ZFW) may not exceed Max ZFW ZFW + fuel for the flight (TOW) may not exceed MTOW TOW - fuel burned during ...


4

That really depends how safely you want to get off the ground. If you are looking to get in and out of tight airfields using STC'ed parts you may want to consider a STOL kit which can modify the plane such that you can utilize a shorter runway. There are some airframes that do have horsepower increase modifications available but that takes actual mechanic ...


2

Most methods of increasing engine power would require major modifications to the engine which would require a Supplemental Type Certificate from the FAA. This would include the use of alternative fuels or fuel additives. A better and much easier method to achieve your goals of shorter runway requirements is to reduce the aircraft weight. This can be achieved ...


1

Takeoff thrust depends on many factors and needs to be calculated carefully. You can take the max values from the manufacturer in orther to have an idea. Cruise can be calculated roughly. Let's see an example. We know that during cruise phase all four forces are level. Lift = Weight and Thrust = Drag We also know that an airliner such as the A320 is very ...


-1

It was due to the wind shear. Wind shear creates a vector gradient. If the vector gradient direction is upward in the head you'll get additional vertical force for lifting and its magnitude is larger than the downward force in the tail. That's why it's called wind shear because the wind applies a shear force to a flying body (in this case airplane). That's ...


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