New answers tagged

1

Even if we disregard the problems current flap systems have if they were to be used as flare controls (speed of operation, lag, discrete positions), and assumed they could be controlled in the same manner as flaps, there are still (at least) two major downsides: Flaring with pitch control (the elevator) is superior in simplicity. Just pull on the stick or ...


3

The Cessna 172S has more power (180hp vs 160hp for 172R) and higher MTOW (2550lb vs 2400lb for 172R). This means that folks used to rotating at 55 knots IAS in earlier models would be closer to stall if taking off "clean". Another way of doing it would be to add 5 knots and rotate clean at 60 knots. Vx is also a bit higher in the 172S at 62 knots ...


5

The 787 was not designed to perform such a maneuver. Any jet airliner could do this. What you need for such a steep climb is a good thrust to weight ratio (or enough excess speed to bleed off during the maneuver). A passenger twin-jet is designed such that it can still climb with at least 2.4% climb gradient after a single engine failure during a takeoff at ...


4

The 787 (and other commercial aircraft) are built to carry large loads, whether lots of cargo, or lots of passengers and bags. So, when empty, their performance is much better. If it can do a normal takeoff when full, then it can do a rocket-like takeoff when empty. The near vertical takeoff is, indirectly, a demonstration of how much power it has when ...


8

Alternate Take-off is a reduced power option feature, similar to flex thrust on turbofans. The aircraft manufacturer will provide performance data applicable to the reduced power setting that can be used when circumstances permit. It's all about reducing wear and tear by not running the engine as hard if it's not essential. The Max Continuous power setting ...


1

Using flaps as a means to shorten the run both on take-off and final is quite common among bush pilots. They can more or less 'kite' down or 'jump' off the runway with the help of more than marginal use of flaps. In commercial aviation it could be automated, but that demands certification, which just doesn't add up financially. The other way around, pulling ...


1

The question is more complex than one might think, at first blush. Can lift be lessened, in order to land, or assure a landing? Of course. It's the reason that spoilers deploy after landing, either manually or with auto ground spoilers, after main gear touchdown; to kill lift, put weight on the wheels, improve braking effectiveness, and to increase ground ...


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