New answers tagged

1

Given that the video did not mention anything being wrong with the aircraft, my money is on the shift in winds being the primary cause for the apparent reduction in airplane performance. I would also blame the pilot for rotating before he had the indicated airspeed for a climb. The time to reject a takeoff is before the wheels leave the ground. The pilots ...


3

The key to getting out of Ground Effect is having sufficient amount of thrust to overcome the increase in Induced Drag as you start to move away from the ground. If you don't have the sufficient amount of thrust to overcome the increase in induced drag you will never leave ground effect and that is indeed what happened in the video. A few observations about ...


0

I propose a thought experiment to answer this question, as follows. We fly a Cessna 172 with full fuel, baggage, and 2 passengers up to a 5000 feet cruise on a hot day, simulating ground conditions in Winslow, AZ. Now we simulate a high density-altitude takeoff roll by cutting the throttle to idle, adding backpressure to reach the verge of stall, then adding ...


5

The idea that the plane was unable to leave ground effect is not quite right, in fact it's the opposite. Ground effect results in the plane having slightly more lift (and less drag) at very low altitudes close to the ground, and it typically comes into play when your altitude is less than the wingspan of the aircraft, this is why it is sometimes described as ...


3

The given rotation speed is most often indicated air speed[IAS]. IAS is calibrated airspeed [CAS] plus instrument errors. (Outside of the airspeed guage, which as a stand alone item is usually very accurate, errors can be caused by pitot tube and static port mounting locations and large changes in angle of attack.) CAS is a measure of dynamic pressure not ...


1

No, two fans stacked in series will not produce the same static lifting force as two fans in parallel. Several factors will be in play. First is that by default the ducted fan blade angles will be assuming intake air at low speed. If you want to add a second stage it needs to have an a higher angle of attack on the second stage (something like the changing ...


11

In this scenario, we may conclude that the Lift is lower than it would be if the plane were flying normally. A low climb rate is not caused by lack of lift. A lack of lift would cause the plane to accelerate downward. Lift is actually slightly less than weight in a steady climb. A low climb rate is caused by excess drag, i.e. by a lack of excess thrust ...


41

According to the video's information: EMB-721 Sertanejo heavy and insane takeoff in Carlos Prates This is "EMB-721 Sertanejo heavy and insane takeoff in Carlos Prates. Full fuel, 6 on board plus luggage Copilot was 0 hours, crystallized and kept pulling the youke [sic]. Cpt took over, lowered his nose and managed to fly." Basically, the ...


14

Looks overloaded for the temperature/altitude conditions. With all the yapping and chattering, it sounds like the cabin was full. Once out ground effect, its rate of climb appears to have been around 50 FPM. The shadow of the tail looks to be a Piper Cherokee, and the engine sounds like a 6 cylinder engine, so I'm guessing it's a Cherokee 6, way overloaded ...


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