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-1

You may be able to take off but as soon as you reach a height of 40-50 feet you lose wing in ground effect and will crash unless you have reached actual free air flying speed. Assuming a completely unobstructed route ahead of the runway the plane will eventually get enough airspeed to fly normally without flaps.


2

It's strictly done to stop the wheels from vibrating as they wind down, which can scare the pax and sometimes the pilot at first. Light aircraft wheels don't get any kind of post-install mass balance until they get to a certain size (and even large wheel assemblies on airliners are only statically balanced in a static rig they way motorcycle tires are done - ...


0

OBSTACLE LIMITED CLIMB: It is natural to think of a required gradient to clear an 'Obstacle'. But that gradient arises from the geometry of the runway, obstacle height/distance and flightpath. The closer, and/or taller the obstacle, the higher the gradient required to clear it with the required margin. Interestingly, it should be pointed out that the ...


0

Yes, both can be used together, allowing actual thrust for takeoff to be much lower than simply 25%. Mostly, Operators prefer the lowest possible thrust so as to have longer engine life, more time on the wing in regular service than off the wing in maintenance. A simple visualization of the derate is to pretend there's a smaller, less powerful engine on the ...


0

Yes, that is allowed. You can combine selection of a fixed derate and an assumed temperature for the takeoff thrust on the FMC N1 Limit page, but only up to a reduction of 25%. Takeoff Derate Fixed derates can be selected on the N1 LIMIT page. [...] Derated takeoff rating can be further reduced by assumed temperature. [...] Assumed Temperature Thrust ...


1

There were a series of RWY overruns during the days of the first group of jet airliners (early to mid 50's), possibly 3 within a 12 month period. Mainly early rotation resulting in the airplane stalling during the takeoff roll at full thrust. Such accidents caused review of the take off maneuver and birth of the RTOW (Regulatory Take Off Weight) calculations....


2

Possibly, but not necessarily. The climb thrust can be selected on the FMC N1 Limit page. The choice is between CLB, CLB-1 and CLB-2. The climb thrust is then reduced according to the selection: 7 - Climb (CLB) Push – selects full rated climb thrust limit. [...] 8 - Reduced Climb (CLB–1 and CLB–2) Push – selects the associated reduced thrust climb mode. CLB–...


0

The Take Off Distance (TOD), Take Off Run (TOR), Accelerate Stop Distance (ASD), by definition, take into account both, the engine failure and the all engines scenario. Read FAR § 25.113 Takeoff distance and takeoff run for the definitions. A balanced field calculation forces us to limit the maximum weight of the airplane so that none among the TOR, TOD, and ...


11

Before starting the takeoff, the pilots will have calculated at least 3 V speeds: V1, VR and V2. The important one for your question is V1, the takeoff decision speed. This is the critical speed that determines whether or not to reject the takeoff in case of a critical failure or other problems. During the takeoff, there are 3 phases relevant for the ...


9

What you describe sounds exactly like compressor surges following an engine failure of some sort (e.g. a bird strike during takeoff.) Here's a video of exactly that happening with a 757 at Manchester (though back in 2007, not this year): In short, this is the result when something (such as damage to the engine) causes ...


29

See this avherald report: https://avherald.com/h?article=4db1ccdb&opt=1 A Jet2.com Boeing 757-200, registration G-LSAN performing a test flight from Manchester,EN to Manchester,EN (UK), was in the initial climb out of Manchester's runway 05L when the right hand engine (RB211) emitted a loud bang and streaks of flame. The aircraft levelled off at 5000 ...


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