129

Years ago now I gave a fair amount of instruction for seaplane ratings. I remember it quite fondly as seaplanes combine the fun of flying with aspects of the fun of boating. There were three conditions in which we used curved takeoff runs. The most frequent curved takeoffs were on rivers, which tend to not run in a straight line, and even for those portions ...


81

I'll limit my answer to single-engine seaplanes as I've never flown a multi-engine seaplane. Typically there is no need to stay stationary in the water when doing a run-up. Just do it while taxiing to your takeoff path, or you can do it on your takeoff path. If the takeoff path isn't long enough to do the run-up and then continue along the path for the ...


61

That's called the step. Without it, you'd have to fight against the buoyancy of the rear end of the hull when you rotate for takeoff. However, a seaplane float or hull must be designed to permit the seaplane to be rotated or pitched up to increase the wing's angle of attack and gain the most lift for takeoffs and landings. Thus, the underside of the float ...


54

The answer: Fixed-pitch propellers. Until the 1930s propellers were fixed pitch only. From Wikipedia: The first practical controllable-pitch propeller for aircraft was introduced in 1932. French firm Ratier pioneered variable-pitch propellers of various designs from 1928 onwards, relying on a special ball bearing helicoïdal ramp at the root of the ...


51

A sea plane was just going around it. It was very loud and got like 10 feet from the shore. It's just going in circles and won't take off and leave. As has been pointed out in other answers and comments, if the aircraft is taking off or landing, there are no regulations requiring distance from persons or structures, at least that I know of. What you may be ...


44

Yes. During and after WW2 several aircraft were converted to serve as "Dumbo" aircraft, dropping boats or rafts near people in distress. Other models were used as well, but the B-17 were among the most prominent. Most were retired when the helicopter gradually took over rescue operations.


43

If you have concerns over the safety of what is going on, here is what you should do: Record a video with your phone. Try to get the N number (it should be painted in large letters on the side of the aircraft). Record the date/time and your exact location where you shot the video from. File a report with the FAA, preferrably by calling the hotline number. ...


41

is there perhaps a similar looking one in reality? Not really, however the fictional five-deck flying boat depicted is clearly an extrapolation of flying boats of the first half of the 20th century. Visually, the Short Empire class is the most similar: domed cockpit at front of hull hull chines four radial engines mounted in-wing with three-blade ...


37

Unless you're planning on trucking a seaplane out of where you have landed it, you usually don't need to worry about slowing down on landing since you can land in a far shorter distance than you can take off. In other words, the landing water run is far shorter than the takeoff water run. If you do want to shorten the water run or reduce your taxi speed, ...


37

This was part of an ad campaign for Timken Roller Bearings in 1946. It is a drawing by George Shepherd.


36

You can sail a seaplane, but there are a lot of considerations. For starters, it makes a big difference as to whether you're talking about a seaplane where the hull is in the water or a floatplane. A floatplane sitting up on its pontoons (floats) is more up in the wind, but it's also more susceptible to rough water because of its higher center of gravity. ...


36

Seaplanes mostly have water rudders that are used at lower speeds and are retractable (actually, they tilt out of the water flow). At higher speeds, like takeoff runs and landings, high speed taxis, they are retracted and the primary means of steering is the plane's rudder. Water rudders are connected to the regular rudder pedals. Airlerons can also be ...


30

The vertical tail surface is like a wing, maybe with a smaller aspect ratio, but it works much the same over sideslip as a wing works over angle of attack. The fuselage, however, is a slender body with a much smaller lift curve slope, but a much higher "stall" angle. In fact, its lift curve slope is nonlinear and tends to increase with higher angles of ...


30

Back in the early 1970s I belonged to a Civil Air Patrol (CAP) squadron that had a J-3 cub with an 85 horse engine on it. During the summer we would operate it on floats, during the winter on wheels. At the end of summer, we would land it on the grass alongside the runway at the Springfield, OR airport (no longer there, it's a big Walmart now) and replace ...


30

It's called a hull step. Below is with and without: It reduces water drag. As the plane gains speed and the aft body is lifted, only the forward hull will be in contact with the water. Source: Laté 631 Replica - Chapter 3 - Hydrodynamics


29

Yes. I mean, sort of. Nobody's ever built a production hydrofoilplane. It's not a bad idea, but seaplanes are a relatively niche product these days and there doesn't seem to be a lot of innovation in the field. Back when there was, there was innovation everywhere so the idea of hydrofoils didn't stick. The Convair F2Y Sea Dart, a 1950s prototype jet-...


29

It is quite common for float planes to carry canoes & kayaks, e.g.


27

The reason is the "flat tail" of the boat. The drag this "flat tail" produces when mounted "reverse" is much less then the dynamic drag it would induce the other way around. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drag_(physics) I don't see how the link helps explain why the flat side produces less drag than the pointed side.– Ron Beyer The published cw ...


27

Large enough helicopters do it. Above example is a Boeing CH-47 Chinook (businessinsider.com) But since you have tagged it seaplane, not to my knowledge. It's often the other way around, seaplane tenders tending to seaplanes (or used to). (I take it by boat you don't mean the inflatable and/or small type, as those are not hard to transport.) Catalina ...


25

One reason for a curved takeoff is the downwind arc method as described on page 4-14 of the FAA Seaplane, Skiplane, and Float/Ski Equipped Helicopter Operations Handbook (FAA-H-8083-23): DOWNWIND ARC The other crosswind takeoff technique results in a curved path across the water, starting somewhat into the wind and turning gradually downwind ...


24

Aircraft on ski's have the same problem, and the answer is relatively simple... They do an abbreviated run-up on the go. Even if the aircraft has a constant speed propeller, many can't feather the propeller enough to completely prevent motion. There are a few piston light aircraft that have a feathering prop, and one that I know of that can actually ...


23

It is a Sikorsky JRS-1 (Like terry I thought it was a PBY as well at first glance, that center wing joint is fairly unique) From the smithsonian website you can find all the info on it here This amphibious seaplane is the only aircraft in the Museum that was at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. Ten JRS-1s were at the U.S. naval base when the ...


23

With regards to the lesser question as to why it is mounted so far from the body, in this case it's actually the only available place; the Catalina is amphibious so mounting it on the fuselage/hull would cause issues with off-water operations. The internal structure of the wing also needs to be considered: the boat can only be attached were there is a ...


22

In addition to steering a seaplane when under power, you can 'sail' a seaplane when the engine is shut down. All you need is air movement from wind or on a river from the current taking the aircraft downstream. This is a good illustration: Image Source I don't think you'd want to approach a dock at a perpendicular angle doing this, but I used to often ...


22

I would like to suggest the "Landseaire" flying yacht which carried boats under the wings as per this question.


21

If the seaplane is operating from a land airport with a control tower AND a water runway, yes. Or, if the seaplane is operating from a Tower controlled water-only aerodrome, such as the one along the waterfront in Vancouver BC in Canada, yes also. Same radio procedures as any other airplane. Otherwise, no.


21

It was one of the main roles for the Vickers Warwick in WWII. From Wikipedia: From 1943, Warwicks were loaded with the 1,700 lb (770 kg) Mk IA airborne lifeboat and used for air-sea rescue. The lifeboat, designed by yachtsman Uffa Fox, laden with supplies and powered by two 4 hp (3.0 kW) motors, was aimed with a bombsight near to ditched air crew and ...


19

Yes. One 'official' example is from the FAA's test standards for land and seaplanes, which includes these tasks for seaplanes: Task H: Glassy Water Approach and Landing [...] Task J: Rough Water Approach and Landing The FAA's Seaplane, Skiplane, and Float/Ski Equipped Helicopter Operations Handbook also uses it; Chapter 6 is called "Seaplane ...


19

The Fernic T-9 of 1929 was prepared for an Atlantic crossing and as a precaution had removable upper engine nacelles which could double as a life raft, including an outboard engine. A less planned use of an airplane part as a boat occurred when in 1932 the Junkers W-33 of Hans Bertram and Adolf Klausmann crashed in a remote part of Western Australia. They ...


17

This may only be part of the story, but the Schneider Trophy was the most prestigious air trophy of that era, and it was initially reserved for seaplanes only. In I Could Never Be So Lucky Again, the famous aviator Jimmy Doolittle (writing about events in 1925) said: The Schneider Cup race, to be held at Baltimore two weeks after the Pulitzer [air race],...


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