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6

Normally, those masts are located on the upper fuselage and sometimes on the wings. They are used to string antennas between them and other airplane parts, or are antennas themselves. In case of the Boulton-Paul Defiant, those antenna masts could not be located in the upper hemisphere in order to keep the field of fire of its gun turret free. Together with ...


2

During the era of the 2nd World War, some aircraft, like the Defiant, had radio masts that were used for communication and navigation. They could be extended while in flight to increase receptive range and retracted before approach to clear them out of the way for landing. Aircraft Anatomy of World War II: Technical Drawings of Key Aircraft by Eden and Moeng ...


2

That looks like a Sikorsky MH-53 to me. Airman Magazine, MSgt Dave Nolan / Public domain


3

One of the countless H-53 variants and sub-variants, most likely a MH-53J/M.


5

It's an MH-53 Pave Low. In the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC), the CV-22 replaced the MH-53, although there were several years when both were in the inventory. From the look of the beach, this photo was taken near Hurlburt Field, Florida, which is where they were both based as the first CV-22's came on-line. Hurlburt Field is also the ...


0

It is hard to tell from such a low resolution picture. Due to the shape of the narrow body, they look like USMC Bell AH-1 SuperCobra. It is probably the AH-1Z Viper version based on the four blade rotor.


1

No. MiG-21 (any modification) didn't need it and didn't have it. With its low-aspect-ratio delta wing and most mass concentrated in the centre, it was agile enough with standard ailerons. The elevator had a single hydraulic booster driving both halves of the stabiliser. Differential stabiliser was used on MiG-21's successor, MiG-23. That one had no ailerons ...


4

Not really. First, the 'legal' reason: the flight manual doesn't offer this method. So you are not supposed to do it. Second, there is a technical reason: MiG-21 had so called 'floating flaps' (as they call it), which are held down only by hydraulic pressure. The pressure is set such that the air dynamic pressure would retract the flaps as the airspeed rises ...


3

This is technologically possible, a commercial jet could be flown remotely like a drone is, through automation and satellite communications. As you allude to there are barriers. Dealing with problems remotely is harder, recognizing and dealing with problems is challenging when you are removed from the source of the information. When you are in the cockpit ...


5

This technology is well known in aviation, and it is already in use for unmanned aerial vehicles, mainly for military use. Obstacles that prevent remote control of passenger carrying airliners at present include: Fail-safe behaviour (What happens if the remote link is interrupted?) Cost calculation (The introduction of such a system would be very costly) ...


0

Nuclear/atomic bombs and warheads both have elaborate automatic arming mechanisms built into them that have to detect the correct sequence of (for example) acceleration, ambient pressure reduction, free fall, re-entry heat, and g-force in order to enable the firing mechanism for the warhead. If any of these signals is missing or presents itself in the wrong ...


3

Usually it won't set off the payload. The payload is designed in a way to prevent it from going off prematurely - say it needs to be armed before it can go boom. Usually you would only arm the trigger mechanism in the end phase - directly before payload delivery since you want to hit your target and not your own installations. Modern explosives are ...


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