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2

Quite simply, you’d need a private pilot license and a type rating. Other posted answers are overtly complicated and many rules mentioned relate to the aircraft (where and how the aircraft can be flown) and not the requirements for the pilot Further, there is no requirement to be instrument rated. Insurance of the aircraft is between you and a private ...


4

This is a broad question that has no real specific answer as there are no specific training sorties dedicated specifically to "muscle memory", let alone muscle memory specific to weapons switchology. Military currency requirements exist for multiple functional skills, air to ground attack, air to air 1v1 ACM, Defensive ACM, carrier landings, instrument ...


2

The panel in the nose cone was a piece of optically flat glass to avoid distortion which would affect the bomb site, and/or to give a camera a clear view forward.


3

I was a Canberra pilot back in the day. The porthole in the canopy was simply a way for the pilot to see his way if the canopy misted or iced up, simple as that. In fact I never had to use it.


2

Depends what you define as a bonafide control? Lets look at the F/A-18C Releasing a weapon from the aircraft is not just a case of pushing the red weapons release button or trigger. A MASTER ARM switch is included to prevent the accidental discharge of weapons, (and in some other aircraft countermeasures and stores jettison functionality). The MASTER ARM ...


38

I believe this is a Dornier Do 18 flying boat / patrol bomber. The cockpit with its central piece of glass is quite distinctive. It entered service in 1938, and doesn't appear to have been involved in the Spanish Civil War. There is a short film on YouTube which has the same sequence as the documentary you saw. Looks like it was part of a movie which ...


2

Because they don't want to be seen. Are fighters allowed to just turn off their transponders in civilian airspace? FR24 and ADS-B Ex are not based on normal transponders (that would require access to actual RADAR data) but rather ADS-B and mode-S transponders. The military can simply choose not to operate with this equipment. This does not make the ...


1

it’s dependent upon the aircraft in question and the approach speed that they need to use, but assuming a fighter aircraft like an F-18 with an approach speed somewhere in the neighborhood of 130 knots a typical 3.5° glideslope to impact yields a descent rate on somewhere between 600-700fpm. The faster the ship is moving at the greater the surface winds it’...


2

I don't know this specification, but the letter at the end indicates the revision number of the document. J would be the 10th revision/ 11th edition. Note that there are often also intermediate publications with minor improvements called 'Amendments' Version J was published in March 2018. The version before, H, was published in June 2003 with Amendments ...


4

Provided the bomb has the same ballistic characteristics, the mass of the bomb would be irrelevant to this. Now the weight of the actual MK82 series 500lb bombs may have a distinct effect on the maneuvering characteristics of the attacking airplane during a bombing run as opposed to carrying a load of MK76 ‘Smurf Killers’ to a target.


8

The actual mass alone is nearly irrelevant to its a trajectory - what mostly matters is the mass/drag ratio - so if you scale the drag correctly, it feels quite the same - at least from the operational point of view. As one does not drop bombs by sight only, a small adjustment on the computer will do the other trick.


0

All countries chart Special Use Airspace (with various classifications such as Prohibited, Restricted, Danger, Warning, Alert, etc.) designated for military training, defense or other national security purposes, along with the hours it is active (if not full time). Many national and international authorities also publish lists/maps of conflict zones and risk ...


1

Military operations are conducted in certain airspace blocks that should be well marked on your charts. If you are IFR your route should avoid such areas, if you are VFR, hope you know what you are doing.


4

It was due to flow issues. Here's an excerpt form Air & Space Magazine We discovered a few things that would need to change before the aircraft entered production. On the X-35B’s STOVL variant, the doors above the lift fan had a bi-fold arrangement: They folded and slid outward, creating an opening for air to enter the fan. However, when the ...


40

Source: F-16 Flight Manual (T.O. GR1F-16CJ-1) It is pressurized yes. Above you can see the schedule. Note that at high altitudes the cockpit altitude would be considered high (low pressure) and insufficient to avoid hypoxia. If the oxygen system (OBOGS) fails, the procedure is to "Descend to cockpit altitude below 10,000 feet", which is about 24,000–26,000 ...


51

Yes, the cockpit of the F-16 is pressurized. However, there are two types of cabin pressurization: Isobaric Pressurisation: The system maintains a constant cabin pressure (usually between 2000 and 8000 ft) as the atmospheric pressure decreases. This is used in commercial aircraft. Hypobaric Pressurisation: In such a system the pressurisation commences at a ...


8

Yes. Like most fighters the cockpit of an F-16 is pressurized, primarily for pilot comfort. Use of an oxygen mask is required equipment for high altitude operations and for emergency situations. The pilot has a pressure breathing on demand oxygen mask, which is required equipment for high-altitude operations.


0

From Michael O'Leary's "United States Naval Fighters of World War II", "Extensive testing had taken place between the Corsair and other types of Allied fighters... The Corsair was tested against just about every fighter the Navy could get their hands on...it was concluded that the Corsair, which outweighed the Mustang by almost 3,000 lbs., was superior to ...


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