New answers tagged

2

I believe that these are static discharge wicks. While I cannot find a manual to substantiate this, this is where static wicks would be, and they are found on 1/32 scale models of the SU-27, as discussed here. These are distinct from the shape of the wicks found on most GA aircraft in the US (just a straight stub of wire, potentially with some insulation ...


5

It's a "simulated ice shape" to simulate a heavy coating of rime ice. This aircraft was likely used in testing to explore the stall behaviour of the outboard wing forward of the aileron in icing conditions. That surface texture would, believe me, NOT improve the stall behaviour. It will not generate vortices or favourable turbulence. It will drop the ...


9

The leading edges are roughened to improve the stall characteristics. Typically vortex generators are used for this purpose nowadays. The 5 and the 5a were used by the RAF for pilot training and the nose strakes were fitted to improve the spinning characteristics - the leading edges of the wings had a roughened paint finish to improve the stall ...


3

For the "and others", the documents from Finland have become public as the secrecy period of 25 years has recently been passed. In a major military deal, there are always technological, economical and political aspects. There were five candidates: Russian MIG-29 Swedish JAS 39 Gripen French MIRAGE 2000-5 General Dynamics F-16 (USA) McDonnell Douglas F/A-...


0

Image source The Sikorsky X2 is (was) a compound helicopter, with an engine driven rotor and a pusher type propeller to offload the main rotor. Image source The Fairey Rotodyne was a compound autogyro: an engine driven rotor, a pusher propeller, and a fixed wing to generate most of the lift at speed. The fixed wing is efficient at generating lift, reduces ...


2

Fairey Swordfish, operated off Royal Navy carriers in WW2. Supermarine Walrus, a single engine pusher flying boat carried on cruisers. Similar vintage.


2

There is a very limited selection of affordable 2-engined fighter aircraft (and the selection was even more limited in the time frame of these acquisitions). Some countries (Canada, Australia) have large uninhabited areas and their air forces prefer the added safety of a second engine. This limited Australia's choices to F-15 or F-18.


5

Why a carrier-capable plane over a land-based plane? Australia has a history of operating carrier craft beginning in the 1920s. At the moment there are two helicopter carriers in the Royal Australian Navy, but no full-deck carriers since the retirement of HMAS Melbourne in 1982. However, Australia is surrounded by a lot of water, and lacks land borders ...


22

Wanting to replace the Dassault Mirage III, and after considering multiple fighters from multiple nations, it boiled down to the F-16 and F/A-18. The F-16 had engine issues, inferior radar, no long-range missiles and BVR capability, single engine, and was technologically immature at the time. Note: There were concerns that the larger more sophisticated F-...


16

Selection of the replacement of the Mirage III was of course carefully considered by the RAAF, and the most suitable airframe was considered for the mission and circumstances typical for a vast, distant and sparsely populated continent: The fact that it was designed for carrier operation actually was a plus, since it results in a more robust airframe with ...


30

Two reasons: The airplane is extremely versatile, while having adequate performance, and is a good choice when a small airforce needs a do-everything airplane to replace multiple types. Being designed for carriers, it's overbuilt for normal land operations in many key areas, which means a longer airframe structural life in its much easier life landing on ...


2

It’s a good question. I remember that during lectures on aircraft structures, it was stated that the horizontal tail should be mounted either at the fuselage or at the top of the vertical tail. Not in between, since that involves having to implement the downsides of both methods. The case of the Bae 125 was mentioned: this was designed as a full T-tail, but ...


6

The appearance of being closed/open is a light trick; light reflecting off the tiny transparent window of the missile launch detector. This detector typically sees in IR and would detect the plume of a heat-seeking missile. According to Wikipedia, the model used on the F-22 is AN/AAR-56 (IR based). (There are videos available on YouTube for its output; ...


3

For FAA purposes you can log PIC time in the T6 because you hold a license in the airplane, single engine, land category and class. However, the USAF might not see it that way. Since you do not have an FAA license for the category and class multi engine land, you can only log PIC time for your solo flights in the T38.


1

Corrosion is not something that occurs "immediately". It happens gradually, when a metal is exposed over a long period to an environment that degrades it (such as a salt water environment, indeed). The parts of an aircraft that are most at risk from its environment are the parts that are exposed to it, and not the internals of its engine. Inside the ...


2

Seaplanes operate from coastal saltwater all the time, ingesting lots of seawater, and they don't do anything special to the engines to deal with seawater ingestion. The effort is mostly on keeping salt rinsed from the airframe and engine externally and they normally get a fresh water rinse at the end of the flying day. Some operators may spray nicely ...


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