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1

In all my years as a fighter jet ground crew guy (armament), grounding the jet before the aircrew got out was not a thing. Not that I remember anyway. Refueling, yes. Weapons loading, yes. A part of general ground recovery ops, yes. But not as a precursor to opening the canopy and pilot egress. And I've been looking through all the Tech Orders and procedures ...


4

When I was a crew chief on B-52Gs, when we would recover a plane, after wheel chocks were placed, but before the airframe was touched by personnel, a wire was connected to a grounding location in the ramp and connected to a grounding receptacle on the aircraft. Knowing about static bonding, I know that the canopy on smaller aircraft is bonded to the airframe,...


6

The simple answer as to why "white shirts" don't remove the cable is that the Navy, like any organization, assigns duties based on skills and training. The skillsets required for catapult and arresting gear maintenance are similar, so it makes sense that personnel preforming these duties are lumped together in the same functional group. I believe ...


3

I think that they just did this for air to air photography. I just did some research, and the only reason I could find was for airdrops.


3

A few of the comments above have it completely right. The tower was staffed by an ATC contract company (Serco I think) right up until the last few days. Once their manager pulled them out, a USAF Combat Control team working with a USMC ATC team provided tactical ATC until they boarded the last plane(s) out of there. Tactical ATC in this case means procedural ...


17

The real answer is because there is no need. Prior to WW2, both the US Navy and US Army had huge interest in seaplanes for exactly the reason you mentioned: large cargo supply operations. Indeed, it was not only the military who were interested. Commercial civil aviation was also hugely interested in seaplanes. The period in history that saw the success of ...


15

In addition to Jan's answer, to recover the aircraft you need to slow down, nearly stopped. This makes the entire ship group vulnerable. Also, an aircraft carrier can recover aircraft at full speed and have multiple launch/recovery operations running at the same time. Swapping out a flight of aircraft takes minutes. For cargo operations this is called "...


29

Because you can't land a seaplane at high seas anyway. Seaplanes can't handle too big waves. It is said that hitting water at high speed is just like hitting concrete (at somewhat slower, but still quite high speed). The landing has to be gentle for the sea plane to handle it (about similar to landing on the land). But if there are significant waves, the ...


4

I will preface this by saying that I could be wrong. I know that the USAF Thunderbirds' F-16 aircraft are not modified other than paint and smoke capabilities. I'm pretty sure that the Blue Angels' F/A 18s are the same, so, by extension, the Fat Albert C-130J should have only have paint modifications, and perhaps smoke or other show mods. The older Fat ...


3

That is a USAF B-52D. These were used extensively in Vietnam, and were retired after. The 2 models that remained in operation after 1983, when the last D-model was retired, were the G and H models. The G models were retired in 1991, leaving only H models still in active service. They are expected to last into the 2050s. The last B-52 built was in 1962, which ...


5

Short Answer: If the case is closed and the plane is neither airworthy nor evidence used in a case where the death penalty was issued, the US government has a full process for destroying it (outlined here). If the log books were found with the aircraft it may be recovered, depending on the state in which they find the aircraft. In the US, property seized ...


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