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If your question is about advantages and disadvantages of the high ceiling: Advantages: -For military aircraft, reaching a high ceiling gives a tactical advantage in air combat and makes it possible to escape from surface-to-air defense . For civil aircraft, it is above all a question of achieving the best efficiency of the engines or of being able to ...


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Satellites can look like this shortly after a serial deployment from a single launch vehicle.


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Matte paint creates drag and reduces the top speed. The sheen of the paint is often adjusted to suit operational conditions. For example during WWII an aircraft being prepared for a special high-speed mission, such as a dangerous reconnaissance flight, might have its matte camouflage waxed over to give it that edge of speed. Many combat jets have routinely ...


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The international distress frequency has been 500 kHz, since 1908. Copious details are at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/500_kHz. During the war, this frequency was used for reporting distress and for monitoring distress, by the Germans and the British. It was also used before and after the war for this purpose, by many countries, by aviators and mariners ...


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By the time that the ME-262 became operational, there was a huge lack of fuel, oil and resources in germany. They also lacked trained, experienced pilots. This means that missions in the ME-262 were limited, and they did not usually go up to shoot down photo-recon mosquitos. Instead the ME-262 and other german fighters of the time were reserved for anti-...


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Although it is difficult to say from old photos, the tubes doesn't seem to be visible on the prototype or early Vulcans. Another Vulcan, XH558 started life as a B2 and are fitted with Olympus 202 engines. Looking at a photo of it there are what appear to be intakes on each engine, as seen here. I don't know what engines the Duxford Vulcan has, but ...


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Well, they're not for fuel dumping or for drag chutes. That much at least is ruled out by the 156-element cutaway diagram on pp. 183-186 of P.D. Stemp's "Kites, birds and stuff: Avro Aircraft." A similar diagram of one of the B.2's Olympus 301 engines might conclusively name these pipes. This photo from Grace's Guide reveals some peripheral pipes that ...


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The two thin pipes next to the inner exhaust ports are indeed fuel dumping pipes. the Drogue chute is mounted in the rear of the fuselage directly below the rudder.


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The F-14 and its AIM-54 Phoenix missile was originally built for a particularly unfriendly intercept of Russian bombers from 100nm away in war time. In peacetime, the TU-95 Bear bombers still needed to be intercepted. That practice, at least in the north Atlantic, was usually for one of a pair of F-14s to fly directly toward the intercept point and well ...


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The most simple reason is the military has its own set of flight rules (AFI 11-202, OPNAVINST 3710.7U) that for many years duplicated many of the applicable FAR/AIM regulations. In addition, the varied mission sets and training scenarios the military operates under sometimes require them to do non-standard things, so there are a number of "carve-outs" for ...


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I am not a flight dynamics expert, but let me give an extremely general answer on verification of a non-linear dynamic system. consider that you have the non-linear system $\dot x =f(x)$. This system may have multiple equilibrium points, which are the $x$ values such that $f(x)=0$. You have checked that one of the desired equilibrium points is actually ...


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Can jet fighters be made to be 2 or 3 times bigger than they are today? Yes. Consider the Tupolev Tu-28 (or Tu-128) "Fiddler" interceptor. Also the Lockheed YF-12A.


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