New answers tagged

-3

Don't even think about it. You'll screw up your instruments (bad if you happen to inadvertently enter IMC in the same flight- and a pilot who tries to roll a non-aerobatic airplane isn't a good pilot, and is probably willing to fly VFR into IMC) and you'll probably bend some metal. Unless you're Tex Johnson or Bob Hoover, you probably can't fly a perfect ...


3

(Charles Bretana's answer provides direct evidence. This answer adds historical context.) Other fighters use differential elevator to cause roll, F/A-18, F-100, F-15, but not F-4: F-4 pilots were trained to use the rudder to roll the aircraft at higher AOA. Instructors were trained to emphasize this flight characteristic, and, whenever at high AOA, to keep ...


6

No, the two sides of the Stabilator are connected to one another and move in unison. The following is from the USAF F-4E flight manual, page 1-21.


0

No. The only movement I saw out of the tail when crews checked controls was both sides in unison,for rolling will definitely use rudder at higher AOA.


1

The upper wing of the Fokker Dr.I is larger in span and chord than the other two. Adding ailerons on the lower wings would had added less effect for additional mechanical complexity, and on the lower wing they would be subject to damage upon ground contact. I know that it is hard to argue here that ailerons must be protected from ground contact, but this ...


0

The only case where I would consider an advantage or disadvantage may be observed in selective airflow is in that single engine German observation aircraft of WW2, the Blom & Voss 141 where the single engine is located to the starboard of the fuselage. Albeit the propeller is located forward of the main body, but the prop wash may have a disproportionate ...


5

I have experience on that program and can tell you that: A: While anything is possible, this would cost a fortune to implement, requiring a complete avionics overhaul. For a single potential customer? Snowball's chance in heck. The customer would have had to commit to paying the development costs, many zillions, which would also have a snowball's chance ...


7

No, you may not fly this drone. It weighs much more than 55 lbs. At least in the United States, you have to have an FAA clearance and hold an FAA Part 107 Certificate to operate anything that heavy.


2

Airbus have claimed they aim to produce hydrogen-fuelled passenger planes that could be in service by 2035. They have developed three ZEROe concept designs. Unveiling its latest blueprints, Airbus said its turbofan design could carry up to 200 passengers more than 2,000 miles, while a turboprop concept would have a 50% lower capacity and range. A third, &...


0

One main drawback not cited in the previous answer is that they don't offer any storage space. Might be good for some gliders, or early planes that where slow and didn't care about range, but for an airliner you still have to put the fuel somewhere. Furthermore the sharp leading edge restrics the range of AOA that the wing can fly without stalling, thus ...


-3

No it can not work that way.That is the begining of acceleration in airplane then it will begin to move one side.


4

The part looks injection-molded. The choice of transparent, moldable polymers available in the 1950s is manageable. The most likely candidates are: PVC (back then the most widely used polymer, but normally not used in injection molding) Celluloid (unlikely due to its high flammability) PMMA (plexiglass) Polystyrene PVC can be detected when a heated copper ...


2

Give the part to a machinist who works with plastics. He will touch the part to a grinding wheel, melting the plastic and making smoke. By smelling the smoke and looking at how the plastic melts, he will be able to tell you which plastic compound the part is made of.


-1

Because all those little propellers will make their own "gust" if you change their power setting. Increased lift with a staticly stable configuration will cause a sharp pitch up if the gust is strong enough. This may be the reason glider pilots like to move the weight back a little, towards a more staticly nuetral gust behavior. Also, those ...


1

I think you’re having a classic dilemma of static directional stability vs dihedral effect. There is always a comprise between two. More dihedral makes airplane more stable in spiral mode. However that makes the dutch roll worse, and in extreme cases unstable. The side flips you are describing sounds like extreme unstable dutch roll mode that eventually end ...


1

Dihedral does not help roll stability to a side force gust. Quite contrary, a gust will roll the plane into a slip, which then will turn the plane downwind (courtesy of your elevator turned rudder). Firstly, I would not recommend setting a model plane with excessive "static stability" in windy conditions. You want to be staticly stable, but not ...


0

Thin cambered wings were the norm in the early days of powered flight, right up to around 1920. Speeds were around 100 mph, the camber spread further back than your illustration shows, and wings were double-skinned but still thin by most standards. They had to be braced to keep them both light and stiff, but at these low speeds it was worth it. Between 1907 ...


1

As that beautiful (but rather heavy) Andean condor, Vultur gryphus, is showing, this is the go to wing for maximum lift at the slowest possible airspeed. Not quite as efficient as the high aspect albatross, but much slower. These wings are all about combining slightly less efficient bottom lift with more efficient (air bending) top lift. Perfect for ...


0

Well, it turns out that the maximum lift for plain, and single/double/tripple slotted flap is surprisingly the same, about 40-45 deg, as shown in this post: https://aviation.stackexchange.com/a/24652/45806 So, there would be no increased lift by adding vortex generators to deflect the flap past 40-45 deg. The only "lift benefit" I can think of, is ...


-1

Internal cooling air might be better termed bypass air as it is not actually bled out of the engine so the energy of compressing this bypass air remains within the overall cycle rather than draining substantial energy from the system, and because turbine combustion is normally oxygen rich this bypassed air does not reduce the total fuel that can be burned. ...


0

An APU can be also be found on many piston aircraft and can itself be a piston engine. Whether the power provided is electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pnuematic or a combination has no impact on the fact that it is an APU. Neither does the end use of the power matter, as long as the power is supplemental or non-essential in normal operations, rather than ...


7

I think you've got this the wrong way round - you don't fly in circles because the guns are on the side; the guns are on the side because you have to fly in circles. The only way to get a fixed-wing aircraft to loiter over a particular spot is for it to fly in a circle. To do this you have to bank the aircraft (i.e., tilt it on its side). If you do this, you ...


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