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4

I think this anecdote bears directly on your question-- I often shoot downwind landings in winds up to 10 mph in a lightweight radio-controlled model airplane of tailwheel configuration. The key is to fly by reference to airspeed, not groundspeed. (One way to accomplish this in a radio-controlled model airplane, which lacks an airspeed indicator, is to ...


8

You don't change anything expect perhaps use short field landing technique to minimize your landing groundspeed, but otherwise you take the high ground speed. In light winds this isn't that big a deal if the runway is long enough. I regularly land with minor tailwind components, under 5 kts, when it's more convenient and there are no traffic conflicts and ...


0

Viable to slip onto the center line? Yes, we can use a sideslip to shift the aircraft sideways relative to the runway, without changing heading. More on this below. However, the body of the question contains some misconceptions-- I am wondering about the viability of side slipping onto the line instead of doing banking maneuvers. In other words, there ...


0

Sideslip will not move the aircraft laterally. It only changes the direction that the nose is pointed in, it does not initiate a turn (a change in the direction of the flight path/ground track). So by itself, it cannot put your ground track on the center line if it is not already there. All it can do is align the direction the nose is pointed in (and, more ...


4

I’m not totally sure how you’re orienting that, are you talking about aligning the aircraft up on final approach from a base leg, then doing a slip to final alignment on the runway CL for final approach? The best way to get the aircraft aligned on runway centerline during the base to final turn, is to note where the runway will centerline will intersect the ...


2

Side slipping to the center of the runway is an excellent technique for high wing aircraft (with minimal risk of a wingtip strike). One might correct a base to final overshoot with a coordinated turn. Once on the final glidepath, finer adjustments can be made by sideslipping. Generally, it is not a good idea to combine uncoordinated flight with a turn, but ...


2

Part 91 operation only requires "The aircraft is continuously in a position from which a descent to a landing on the intended runway can be made at a normal rate of descent using normal maneuvers". The touchdown zone referenced in 91.175c applies to 135 and 121 operations and they will have clarification in their op specs.(Which are also legally ...


31

This is a published visual approach: Source: FAA via skyvector.com [cropped] Due to the tight airspace because of the neighboring Newark and JFK, and also for noise, the airspace/procedure designers find solutions that have the least impact on the overall airspace and throughput. From the FAA's YouTube channel, a Jan 2021 video that is worth watching: New ...


1

A small anecdote here. With a bit of analysis later. I used to haul gliders up into the air mostly using a Piper Supercub. On a good day I did 20 to 40 starts, and landings of course. After a while it can become a bit boring so I invented small challenges for myself. Such as always leaving the glider in the best updraft around the field at at end of tow (the ...


2

As mentioned in other answers, computer programs exist that can land a plane. That shows that algorithms exist to land a plane. That doesn't mean that a human can mechanically implement said algorithms. OP compares landing with parking, saying that they apply an algorithm to park. The difference with landing a plane is that, compared to parking, there many ...


3

Autopilots regularly perform landings, so yes, landing can be described as an algorithm. But since human brains are unable to perform such an algorithm, we depend on our neurons to build pathways that approximate the "perfect" solution - these pathways we perceive as experience and gut-feeling.


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