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2

Unless the wind is too strong you should try to land uphill. Tailwind will increase the required length of the runway. When you land uphill you have a significantly larger angle between your glide path and the hill slope compared to landing on a horizontal runway. That means the required length of the runway decreases. Both effects work against each other ...


2

A 10 degree downslope on a road would be a 17% down grade, a very rare road indeed. The glide slope of a 172 is around 1:8 which works out to a 7 degree downslope (using sin and arcsin trigonometry), which is a 12.5 % downgrade, what to do? With an emergency landing, it is best to land into the wind. A crash at 30 knots groundspeed is far more survivable ...


0

If there was no wind, I'd probably land uphill, but in the circumstance you describe I'll take the into-wind direction landing down the hill. This gives the lowest ground speed and therefore the lowest energy state if things don't go so well (you have a 30 knot energy difference between the two landing directions - that's a lot, and a bigger deal all around ...


0

The question is more complex than one might think, at first blush. Can lift be lessened, in order to land, or assure a landing? Of course. It's the reason that spoilers deploy after landing, either manually or with auto ground spoilers, after main gear touchdown; to kill lift, put weight on the wheels, improve braking effectiveness, and to increase ground ...


2

Can you use control surfaces to control an aircraft? Yes. Are flaps controls a way to control the control surfaces? Yes. Can you use them to control an aircraft? Yes. Could you land this way? Possibly. Is this something you should try? No. Flaps are a slow, clumsy and coarse method to modify your control surfaces and there are all sorts of attendant ...


7

Yes, but. Flaps will change the pitch equilibrium to nose-up when moved up, so when you want to increase your lift coefficient, you need to reduce the maximum lift coefficient to make the airplane pitch up. This makes flaps much less suitable for take-off and landing than the elevator, but you can control airplanes with flaps only under some conditions. You ...


8

While this is an interesting idea, there are some key issues with it. As a GA pilot, here are my issues with that concept. Changing flap settings causes signifigant differences in aircraft handling. If I was, say, on short final, and I changed my aircraft's configuration - it would be difficult to maintain a stable approach profile to the runway. If I were ...


2

Rudder. It is amazing how much even a tiny puff of wind can move the nose off line. If you are on "short short", just clearing the fence, your momentum will carry you onto the runway even if you are almost sideways. (But this is not good for the landing gear). Most important here is to round out correctly at the proper airspeed (the earlier you ...


1

Pilots aim on attitude rather than rate. But, with that in mind, the typical touchdown is somewhere around 50-300ft/min. Anything below 200fpm in a B787 tend to feel very smooth (personally I've never seen less than 105fpm, and it was super smooth, as smooth as you can expect), different aircraft feel different. Between 200 to 300, feels normal, and above ...


0

Found this definition on an FAA website today: The runway touchdown zone is usually defined as 1000 feet from the runway threshold or 1/3 the total available landing distance. This provides runway “underrun” in case the pilot comes up short of his/her aim point, as well as increased obstacle clearance while on final approach.


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