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3

It's unlikely the pilot would be switching the "propulsion master" off, but it's very probable that "idle power" on the throttle or thrust lever would in fact be a stopped or stopped/feathered motor. It's likely that regen braking would be electrically available, but it's probably something you wouldn't want to use in flight, for the same reasons you don't ...


3

"To get a good flare". Never heard of pilots talking about "wow, I had a great flare on that landing!", although a very famous test pilot really had a beauty landing the XF-92A, reducing landing speed from around 160 to 67 mph. So why do we flare? What is a flare? "Flaring" is increasing AOA to MAINTAIN lift as the plane slows down. Why do we slow ...


3

In my experience the best altitude for a fully stalled landing is about 1 inch. Seriously though, the method I use is to fly as close as I can to the ground without touching down with practically no throttle and finally reducing the remaining throttle whilst maintaining the height above the ground by increasing the angle of attack until it finally stalls and ...


1

Back when actual butter was the main spread to put on bread, it took a very gentle touch to spread butter straight from the refrigerator (icebox) without tearing up the bread. Thus, a very smooth landing might be said to have "buttered the bread" because it went on smoothly enough to keep from tearing anything up. This probably also evolved into "greased ...


3

You fly final approach at the "reference speed" (Vref) for the flap setting which varies with weight. You will normally set up the reference speed for full flap on the speed bug on the speed tape on the primary flight displays, and on final while the autopilot flies the glide slope you will modulate thrust to hold the approach speed (or let the autothrottle ...


0

Yes, if spoilers are deployed. True to their name, spoilers reduce the amount of lift a wing produces at a given speed and AOA. They also help slow the plane down by adding drag. Although "ground effect" will contribute to "floating", flaps, slats, and spoilers, essentially speed brakes, all help slow the plane down enough to land.


4

Setting aside the costs and complexities of such a system, it's also important that the energy you can recover this way is limited to the aircraft's kinetic energy at touchdown. This is a small fraction of the total energy obtained from the energy stored in the aircraft's fuel. For instance, the Boeing 737NG series, which lands in the 50t ballpark of your ...


1

If a plane needs to go around after touchdown (eg: runway incursion), but its already caught on the arrester system, that is one bad scenario. If the arrester system fails after being caught, then the pilot has an extremely brief window to switch to traditional braking (reverse thrust, control surfaces and brakes). That is another really bad scenario. ...


7

When you are on short final and something is on, is entering, or even seems to be entering the runway, you execute a go around. As for the second part of your question, given the loose parameters I'm afraid there is an infinite amount of different scenarios, and therefor I can't provide a comprehensive answer.


2

To put things in perspective, 75000€ is the amount an airline will pay in compensations and duties of care on a single flight with ~100 passengers arriving late. So, if a single flight per year is delayed because of the landing system failure in the receiving airport, or the airplane getting damaged after such a landing, you'll instantly lose all the profits....


1

So what you are suggesting is to replace a well-tested process for stopping planes, self contained and redundant (brakes) by a complex mechanism which fundamentally takes away control from the captain (the go-around, as all other maneuvers is the decision of the captain) or has a super complex control handover between plane and ground systems. Not to mention ...


1

No need to modify any airplanes. You would make the first half of the runway just past the touchdown strips into a conveyor belt. The conveyor belt uses radar to determine the aircraft's ground speed, and expends energy to spin up the conveyor to projected speed of the airplane on touchdown. The airplane touches down, and its wheels never spin up, it ...


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