New answers tagged

3

It is fine to slip and slide through a turn when you have enough altitude; doing so while being slow and close to the ground is much less advisable. Coordinating controls in turns is especially important when being slow and low. The key to a good approach is space: Fly a large pattern so you have enough time to adjust heading and sink rate during the final. ...


1

You could be drifting into dangerous territory (pun intended...hahahah). There should be NO slipping and sliding going on in any airplane or glider on final except for side slips induced on purpose to lose altitude, or for crosswind compensation during the landing flare. All maneuvering turns in flight must be coordinated. Cross control or skidding maneuvers,...


1

In a cross wind landing one can stay coordinated and crab their way down to the round/flare phase, but over the runway rudder and ailerons have specific purposes. The rudder points the nose of the plane straight down the center line. The ailerons are used for lateral control, banking into any crosswind component. For example, a 5 degree roll in a Cessna 172 ...


0

If you have questions regarding the specific Airport it is always better to check in AIP. For Innsbruck, for example, VFR (most of the PPL pilots), Airspace D, and no restrictions mentioned in Airport info, so yes it is allowed. And you can find Visual Approach Chart in AIP.


3

Categories are for commercial pilot operations, they don't apply to private pilots, so there's no inherent regulatory limitation to flying into a Category C airport. The regulations say commercial pilots must be appropriately trained, and airlines have specific rules internally for this and say who can land at them, i.e. captains only or not. A private pilot ...


5

for any reason the engines stopped working, and there's nothing near or far that could be used for landing, except the endless water. You have answered your own question... if it is impossible to reach solid land, they attempt a water landing ("ditching"). The ideal is always to land (or "water" in this case) at the slowest possible ...


6

The categories you are referring to fall under a classification system internal to airlines. Related: Why is Heraklion airport a 'captains only' airport? Any restrictions imposed by the national authority will be included in the aeronautical information publication, or AIP. Taking your Innsbruck (LOWI) example, here's what the Austrian AIP says: 3.1....


5

Generally speaking, the short answer is "probably not" (I don't know Innsbruck). Long answer: If you look into it (as a private pilot, you should know "how" already), you will most likely find that there will be a number of obstacles in your path at the majority of large airports. These obstacles can include (but are not limited to) : ...


Top 50 recent answers are included