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Landing at the same speed, there is one particular type of aircraft that will stop after a shorter distance if it is heavier: taildraggers. Trying not to discount aerodynamic effects, the fact that one airplane is heavier than the other implies that the heavier one will need to touch the ground at higher angle of attack than the lighter one. Which means a ...


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I agree.Should there be any inadvertent throttle retard due to turbulence or runway surface ,the NFP can push them back up.It's SOP in the Navy and Air Force in multiengine side by side cockpits. It also guards against inadvertent throttle retard due to failure of the seat adjustment slides during the catapult shot( S-3 Vikings,E2C Hawkeyes,C-2 Greyhounds,...


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The key to this question is "maximum braking without skidding the tires". With a clean dry surface, the lighter plane at equal speed stops faster. On a slippery or icy surface, the tables are turned, and a lighter plane will skid much more easily and take longer to stop, due to less traction. The brakes stop the wheels, but the wheels will not stop the ...


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One thing is right in your demonstration: braking distance is independent of airplane mass. However, it is the braking force that stop the airplane, not the heat produced by braking. The heat and noise produced during braking only consume a small portion of the kinetic energy of the airplane. The practice of wheel braking has been in use for over 1,000 ...


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One very strong reason thrust vectoring is of little or no use to offset flap-induced pitch moment: you reduce thrust to idle or near idle during landing, which would make the thrust vectoring ineffective. The Harrier lands at higher throttle (it takes much more than 50% power just to hover with no stores aboard). If you were using fans at the nose, driven ...


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I'm not sure why we're assuming that flap deployment will cause pitch instability. As far as I'm aware, flap deployment moves the CoP rearward, which should make the aircraft more stable. I may be missing something here, though, I'm still working my way through Perkins&Hage. I'm not quite following Peter's argument about gusts. For now we'll work under ...


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No, for several reasons What you want is to compensate for the additional lift from downward deflected flaps at the back of a flying wing with vectored thrust. As @Sean points out this will not bring a noticeable net benefit if the lengthwise location of both forces is similar. But that is not all. Besides the force equilibrium around the flying wing you ...


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No. Thrust vectoring produces a nose-up pitching moment by pointing the engine nozzle upwards, which pushes the aircraft's tail down and its nose up. Extended flaps increase total lift, and produce a nose-down pitching moment, by deflecting air downwards at the trailing edges of the wings, pushing the aircraft's tail up and its nose down. As the engine ...


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the nose gear support strut contains a bearing which allows the nose wheel to swivel like a caster so the plane can turn on the ground. the nose wheel assembly itself is turned either via a hydraulic cylinder or a mechanical linkage connected to pads on the upper tips of the rudder pedals, or in some cases it freely turns on its own during the application of ...


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