Hot answers tagged

92

Practically speaking, the 'heavy' designator ('super' for A380 and An225) is to help enforce separation requirements due to wake turbulence. In case of AF1, it is not as if other aircraft are going to be allowed near it, so the designator is redundant. Regulation wise, FAA JO 7110.65T Section 4. Radio and Interphone Communications, specifically states that ...


59

If a visual approach is offered, and it gets accepted by the pilot, the airport can declare higher capacity. Whereas IFR procedures reduce the airport's capacity. US and European airports handle their slots differently. Europe plans for the worst, which can on good days limit the full potential. The US plans for the best, which can on bad days end up in ...


58

Can you? Absolutely, and air traffic control will treat you (almost) like any other airplane. You are supposedly handled on a first-come-first-serve basis (reality is slightly different with different aircraft speeds, etc.). Do the airlines like it if you slow them down? No, but it's part of the system and the way that it works. Very often, there are ...


55

The pilot in command has final authority over Air Force One Air Force Instruction 11-202, Volume 3 says the following in Chapter 1, part 1.1.1 (as in, the very first thing in the document): 1.1.1. Pilot in Command Authority. The Pilot in Command (PIC), regardless of rank, is responsible for, and is the final authority for the operation of the ...


45

Apparently you aren't the only person who wondered this; the FAA actually has it in an FAQ: What is the significance of a runway 8069 feet in length and why are two different aerodrome symbols used to depict hard surface runways on Sectional charts? For purposes of airport depiction, specialists represent a runway between 7970 and 8069 feet in ...


45

It's technical, not political The F-35 was an attempt to do exactly what you propose, lowering costs by planned sharing of 80% of parts across variants, but it turns out that the USN's F-35C costs over twice as much as the USAF's F-35A, and only shares 20-25% of it's parts. The project has been a disaster practically since day one, and the services are ...


41

A license, once granted, is good forever (barring some enforcement action). But, you need more than just a license to fly. To use your license, while flying solo, you also need a Medical Certificate (if required for the aircraft or flight rules) and a Current BFR (Biennial Flight Review). Medical Certificates are good for 5 years until you're 40, then ...


41

I did it in 17 days - start to finish. Did flight school in Arizona. Before I went, I got the PPL study guide, MS Flight Simulator complete with a yoke, pedals, and throttle quadrant... and put in dozens of hours just learning the instrument scan and practicing virtual stuff. When I got to the flight school, I already knew the parts of the plane, and ...


41

Simply, because no airline has determined the route makes economic sense. A poll doesn't necessarily translate into a ready market of passengers. Sure, lots of people might check a box on a survey saying they'd like to see such a thing, but does that really translate to thousands of people actually a significant sum of money for the service? Would enough ...


37

My favourite entry in my logbook is 2013-08-02 KOSH-KORD 1.5 hrs – from Air Venture in Oshkosh straight into Chicago O'Hare, in a Cessna 172 :-) A friend of mine and I have flown into SFO (with our instructor), and dropped of my friend, who then took a Lufthansa flight to Munich. So, having flown into SFO, ORD, and SAN (San Diego, the busiest single-runway ...


34

If the GPS is unavailable, it will be quite an impact to the aviation industry. All airliners in-flight will experience degraded RNAV performance, but they would make it to the destination using VORs, DMEs and ILSs. For general aviation, things are not so lucky. The GPS display provides an excellent situation awareness in small aircrafts; without it, ...


34

This sounds like a “people problem”. That kind of problems is best solved with enforcement. Source of radio broadcast can be localized and it is not particularly difficult. There are techniques for transmitting something secretly, but they need specific modulation. Rogue broadcast or jamming on simple AM voice channel will be trivial to triangulate. So if ...


33

Assuming a regular private pilot's license (i.e. not sport/recreation), a part 61 instructor, and a rented aircraft, then you need to budget for the following: Aircraft rental (this usually includes oil and fuel) Instructor time (air and ground) Materials (books, DVDs, charts, fuel tester etc.) as recommended by your instructor Headset Third-class medical ...


32

The most obvious thing to me would be to just talk to them: Medevac 123, this is the Diamond on base for 31, do you need to expedite your departure? If they say no, then just continue and land as normal. If they say yes, then I'd get out of their way: Medevac 123, roger, we'll extend our base and fly a wide upwind to let you out I wouldn't worry ...


30

ICAO Class F airspace is a bit of an odd duck (and the US FAA is apparently not the only agency that thinks so - from a quick check on Wikipedia it seems more jurisdictions ignore class F than implement it. They only mention Class F as being in use in Germany and the UK). From a functional/regulatory standpoint Class F is a sort of hybrid between "Class E" ...


30

The FAA has an airmen inquiry search portal. I put Nathalie Brown and came up with Nathalie Myrtle Brown with the following details: Certificate: PRIVATE PILOT Date of Issue: 11/25/1968 Ratings: PRIVATE PILOT AIRPLANE SINGLE ENGINE LAND AIRPLANE MULTIENGINE LAND INSTRUMENT AIRPLANE As @FredLarson points out in comments ...


28

Just to add to Lnafziger's answer (which is entirely correct), the FAA has designated five airports as "High Density Traffic Airports" (covered in FAR Part 93 Subpart K) which specifically limit the number of scheduled IFR arrivals, and it's easy to misread that as "you can't land here." Part 93.129 specifically says: (a) IFR. The operator of an aircraft ...


27

It looks to me like you need to file FAA Form 7480-1, Notice of Landing Area Proposal. There is a checkbox for "Deactivation or Abandonment". The form explains that you have to give 90 days advance notice. So you shouldn't make any changes until 90 days after filing the form. This presumably gives them time to update charts, so that pilots know the ...


26

For filing and opening VFR flight plans, pushing back your ETA because of a delay, and a few more obscure things which you can find in section 4-1-21 of the AIM you would contact Flight Service (addressed as "region Radio" - e.g. "New York Radio" or "Bridgeport Radio") The universal flight service frequency is 122.2, and above 5000 feet you should be able ...


26

I can't answer for the Blue Angels or the Thunderbirds, but I can for the UK equivalent, the Red Arrows. The Red Arrows have no spare pilots (or 'B team'). The nine pilots on the team fly every display in their 3 year tour. The explanation is that a spare pilot would not fly frequently enough to be current and safe. They do however have the capability to do ...


26

Hawaiian Airlines only recently started acquiring airplanes (A330-200) that are capable of that range. According to Wikipedia, London and Paris routes were discussed. On November 27, 2007, Hawaiian Airlines signed a MOU (Memorandum of Understanding) with Airbus for 24 long-range jets priced at $4.4 billion. The order included six Airbus A330-200s with a ...


26

There is no US regulation about whether an airport can be called "international." The Secretary of the Treasury designates the official list of international airports of entry. But not all airports on this list are even called international, and it does not include all airports with international flights. There are even some airports called "international" ...


24

Well, the short version is that there really isn't a standard (and this applies to small as well as large airports). Some airport authorities charge fees that are billed through the FBO, some don't. Some airport authorities bill you directly, some don't. Normally you pay at the FBO before you leave. Most of the FBO's set their own fees (although they may ...


24

That direction (284) is the true heading, but runways are numbered according to the magnetic heading. Runways are usually numbered according to their direction, more precisely called runway magnetic bearing or QFU (see Q codes). (How are runways numbered?) For KTEX: 276 magnetic, 285 true 096 magnetic, 105 true While 276 should be rounded to runway ...


23

The purpose of the "heavy" designator is create situational awareness because of its wake turbulence. There are also different separation requirements when following a heavy aircraft. Since all air traffic around Air Force 1 is likely to be heavily controlled, there's no need to call out that it's a heavy.


22

The short answer to "Can I smoke in my own private aircraft?" is "Yes, usually". As Promised, I looked up the relevant FAR (23.853 - Passenger & Crew Compartment Interiors). The actual rule is long and verbose, but pretty common sense. The important regulatory bits for most personal aircraft are just two points though. You must: Have "an adequate ...


21

The minimum required hours of instruction is 40 hours. How many will you need to get the license? That depends on a lot of factors. Very few students are good enough at 40 hours to pass the practical test. If you can only fly once per week, you will "forget" some of what you learned on the last lesson. "Forget" is in quotes because some of the ...


21

Low volume, high liability, and the overhead of certification all contribute to the high price of factory-new aircraft. Certification The process to design, build, and test an aircraft to receive a type certificate from the FAA adds time and cost to any new clean-sheet design (substantially more cost if the design is novel in some way). The design and ...


21

An airway (Victor or otherwise) is just a standard route for aircraft to fly on in the national airspace system - for all practical purposes they are literally highways in the sky (with the lanes being stacked vertically rather than horizontally). This is part of the paradoxical logic of how ATC provides separation services for IFR aircraft: "You have to ...


20

Private airports have very little security and light aircraft flying within a country typically aren't required to file a flightplan and aren't required to have transponders for secondary radar. You can get in a private aircraft and fly off pretty much as easily as you can get in a car and drive off. Private aircraft crossing international borders are ...


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