143

@Pondlife gave a very good answer, and I'll add a few bits to that. Even after having gotten my license, I still use Flight Sims (mainly Microsoft FSX and X-Plane 10) for some practice. Before flying into an unfamiliar airport, or over an unfamiliar area, I'll often load it up in a simulator, and fly it. Especially when I was a student, I found this ...


98

If you're low, slow, and heavy (say, early in climb with full passenger and fuel load for a transcontinental or transoceanic leg), just dipping a wing can result in a stall and crash if you lose power while in a more than minimal bank. The reasoning goes like this: the birds might not hit you. If they do, it's unlikely you'll lose all engine power. Even ...


92

Not possible to see birds in time Incredible as it may seem, this re-enactment of flight 1549's bird strike is actually drawn out and made twice as long as it actually happened. The Cockpit Voice Recorder transcript, note the seconds. 15:27:10.4 HOT-1 birds. 15:27:11 HOT-2 whoa. 15:27:11.4 CAM [sound of thump/thud(s) followed by shuddering ...


70

Stall was an unfortunate choice of words for an engine that suddenly quits since the aerodynamic stall in aviation means something very different and isn't related to the aircraft engine at all1. To a non-pilot, an aerodynamic stall can best be described as the situation where there is not enough air flowing over the wings to create the amount of lift ...


58

It can definitely help: when I did my instrument rating my instructor used MS FS to walk through (fly through?) various procedures before doing them for real. He also used it for NDB training because the aircraft we used didn't have ADF. I found it very useful, and if I had bought it myself it would probably have saved me a lot of time and money. The main ...


57

Light Propeller Aircraft, if flown within their design limits, are just as safe as jets. If you do a proper and thorough daily inspection, you are far less likely to suffer any form of mechanical failure in the air. In saying this, the majority of all crashes, be it in a Jet Powered Airliner or a Propeller Driven Light Aircraft are caused due to pilot error. ...


53

The approach to Paro is unbelievably complicated. It is flown visually through a valley with high mountains all around and no sight of the airport until the last moment. Here is a cut of a map with the approach paths: Approach to runway 15, marked in red, is worse in this regard. The ridge is rather close to the airport, so the final turn usually ends over ...


46

What the T-38 airplane provides NASA is currency and proficiency in high performance aircraft operations in a jet which has many of the same characteristics as the shuttle in this respect ie high wing loading, high approach and landing speeds, similar glide descent ratios. The White Rocket is a temperamental and challenging little jet to land and will not ...


45

When every transmission to the tower begins with "Executive Tower...." that is the keyword that makes the controller's ears perk up and start taking notes. If you don't say the magic words, your controller may be a step or two behind as you rattle off your request. Also, you think you're on the right frequency, and you think you know who you're talking to, ...


44

In the hands of an inexperienced pilot, a jet is definitely the unsafer choice. Due to the general higher speeds, there is less time to recover from errors and they require more anticipation to be ahead of the game. Small errors will grow into large errors in relatively short time. In slower aircraft there is more time to correct. In addition, jet and ...


42

A typical discovery flight is about a 30 minute on the ground introduction to the airplane and the cockpit controls, followed by a sightseeing flight of 30-minutes to one-hour. The entire process typically lasts 1 to 2 hours. During the flight, the instructor will have the controls for takeoff, navigation and landing, but may turn the controls over to the ...


41

Technically yes. But I am unaware of any attempt to do this with airliners. But there were several designs in the past which used a big airplane or a Zeppelin as a mother ship, which took fighters with it for air defense. The B-36 was involved in several such designs. In all cases the docking was made from below, because this gave the fighter pilot the ...


35

From a safety perspective both pilots should be handling any emergency that arises, each working to their individual strengths and expertise to ensure a safe outcome. This is exactly what you did in the scenario you describe. In terms of who calls the shots (acts as PIC for the emergency), generally the most qualified pilot onboard should be the one giving ...


35

In 727 and 747-100/200 aircraft and their simulators for the two airlines I flew those aircraft for up to my retirement in 1999, all stall training was done in simulators, never in the actual aircraft. Stall training in the sim consisted of slowing (or otherwise loading up the wing) until the stick shaker started. Recovery was accomplished by unloading the ...


34

I believe that there's an element to this question which has not been covered. This is very much a personal response. Your question specifically asks whether it can help you to learn how to fly or become a better pilot. This is actually two questions in one. Physical and mental limitations not withstanding, I would say that just about anyone can learn ...


33

Assuming a regular private pilot's license (i.e. not sport/recreation), a part 61 instructor, and a rented aircraft, then you need to budget for the following: Aircraft rental (this usually includes oil and fuel) Instructor time (air and ground) Materials (books, DVDs, charts, fuel tester etc.) as recommended by your instructor Headset Third-class medical ...


33

An engine stall and an aerodynamic stall are completely different. In aviation, an engine stall is referred to as an engine failure, and an aerodynamic stall is simply referred to as a stall. For Nerds An aerodynamic stall happens when the wing stops producing lift because the Angle of Attack is too high. This is usually, but not always, caused by pulling ...


32

X-Plane offers a "Professional Level" which is mostly about licensing. However X-Plane also has an FAA certified version that if paired with proper controls is legal for certain training/instructional hours. You can find more info on the FAA's approved simulators here and here. The flight school I trained at had a certified sim from the 80's that was pretty ...


31

First, these answers insofar as the licenses and airline operations apply to the U.S. system since that is all I am familiar with. You must have a Flight Engineer license to operate as an FE. Just as a pilot's license has ratings on it, so does an FE license, and you have to have a rating that matches what you're flying. My FE license has a single rating, ...


31

The closing speeds are simply too high to be able to do anything. A jet airliner is flying at an absolute minimum of 250km/h. Geese can fly at well over 50km/h, so you're looking at a potential closing speed of over 300km/h. Even if you could identify a bird a kilometer away as being a threat to your plane, that only gives you less than 12s to react, and ...


30

This is really two questions Why does Paro need special certification? Why doesn't Princess Juliana need special certification? I'll answer both, which I think answers your overall question about "Why does Paro need special certification but Princess Juliana doesn't?" Why does Paro need special certification? You've mostly answered this, it's because it'...


30

The correct way to recover from a stall is counter intuitive, not because pilots are trying to climb, but because the nose of the airplane drops due to the loss of lift and aircraft design. 99.999% of the time (when the aircraft is not in a stall), if the nose drops, you simply pull back in order to raise it and this muscle memory is built over time. ...


30

Almost every pilot learns to fly in an actual aircraft, this is one of the reasons all trainers have dual controls. My first day out, ever, was in an actual plane, behind real controls, in the sky. No sim-time prior to that. The instructor talked me though takeoff and maneuvers (keeping an eye on everything and operating the rudder). All he did was radio ...


30

Yes learn both, but... not at the same time. As Dave says, there are too many differences to be absorbing simultaneously. It's like a new airline pilot taking a type course on a Dash 8 and an RJ at the same time. It'll burn you out. If all this is a hobby activity in the first place with no urgent time lines, drop the power training for now and go take a ...


30

It appears to depend on how much changed. You do have to have some training between models. The selling point was that an airline with 737 pilots could fly the MAX variant with minimal retraining "The airplane is configured to be very common with the [737 NG]," Wilson, who is now retired, said, "and so a pilot can walk into here and will find everything ...


29

Well, you screwed up, but nobody got hurt, no metal was bent, and since the tower didn't yell at you presumably you didn't obviously endanger anyone's safety (though there's always some level of risk when an aircraft isn't where the tower expects it to be). As far as deviations go, that's not good, but it's not terrible. The tower was probably expecting ...


29

1 word: Instruction. I learned to fly in the US, and all but one of the 10-15 instructors at the school were young guys who had a Commercial license and were just building hours while doing their exams and applying to airlines. This meant they were actually getting paid (not particularly well, I hasten to add!) to build hours, rather than spending money on ...


29

I posted this answer on FB a while back: I’m a commercial pilot as well as a flight sim fan with somewhere in the neighborhood of 7000 hours logged on Flight Simulator and Falcon 4.0 games. I disagree with the assertion that the sims are so different from the real thing. While it is true that the kinesthetics of being in a real airplane are different from ...


29

When pilots are trained for flying in an aircraft type they have not flown in before, they go through type rating, then line training. During the type rating, they learn where all the instruments and buttons are, what starts which system, how the plane behaves, how to land and auto-land etc. During line training, they spend time in the cockpit together with ...


28

Supposedly, this is because in the early days of flight before intercoms were common instructors used to sit behind their students in a tandem aircraft and pull on their shirt tails to give directions. After successfully soloing, the student has shown that he doesn't need that direction any more and therefore doesn't need his shirt in one piece either. This ...


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