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45

It's technical, not political The F-35 was an attempt to do exactly what you propose, lowering costs by planned sharing of 80% of parts across variants, but it turns out that the USN's F-35C costs over twice as much as the USAF's F-35A, and only shares 20-25% of it's parts. The project has been a disaster practically since day one, and the services are ...


26

There is no US regulation about whether an airport can be called "international." The Secretary of the Treasury designates the official list of international airports of entry. But not all airports on this list are even called international, and it does not include all airports with international flights. There are even some airports called "international" ...


24

That direction (284) is the true heading, but runways are numbered according to the magnetic heading. Runways are usually numbered according to their direction, more precisely called runway magnetic bearing or QFU (see Q codes). (How are runways numbered?) For KTEX: 276 magnetic, 285 true 096 magnetic, 105 true While 276 should be rounded to runway ...


18

It depends on the operator's "opspecs" which are negotiated between them and the FAA. Generally in the US the vast majority of part 121 scheduled airline operations are required to be IFR, but plenty of part 135 charters are permitted to fly VFR. They may be subject to weather minimums higher than the general VFR limits.


17

The YF-17 is the answer to your question. It is the predecessor to the F/A-18, and was designed as a land-based fighter. The YF-17 is much lighter than the F/A-18, because it does not need to carry equipment for carrier landings. Adding this equipment makes the aircraft heavier, compromising performance. You then need to compensate for the added weight, but ...


17

Based on my current navigation database (AIRAC 1909, valid from 2019-08-15), I found 7 US airports with 4 (or more) parallel runways: KATL (Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport): 5 parallel runways: 08L/26R, 08R/26L, 09L/27R, 09R/27L, 10/28 KDEN (Denver International Airport): 4 parallel runways: 16L/34R, 16R/34L, 17L/35R, 17R/35L and 2 more ...


17

It is defined by the ICAO in this glossary: International airport. Any airport designated by an ICAO Contracting State in whose territory it is situated as an airport of entry and departure for international air traffic, where the formalities such as customs, immigration, public health, agricultural quarantine and similar procedures are carried out.


11

The needs to operate on a carrier are different than the needs for a land based aircraft. They are subtle, but significant. As others have pointed out, the F-35 attempted to address these issues and wound up way over budget. (It was made even more complicated by the addition of a STOVL version for the Marines, the F-35B). CATOBAR aircraft differ from ...


9

In North America, just buy an air-band radio and listen to Raleigh-Durham tower all you like, or if your ham unit receives the aviation VHF frequencies, do that. Or find it on LiveATC.net It's only illegal to broadcast without authorization, not listen in.


6

Product liability destroyed this industry. In the 1970s GA aircraft were much less expensive. A midrange model cost about twice the annual salary of the average US worker. Annual production was about 14k per year. Then attorneys found out that juries could be persuaded to award ten times as much for a death in a small airplane as for the equivalent death ...


6

I flew for TWA International from 1970-1990. We had microwave ovens on all of our 747's. It took a long time to train the older F/A's on their operation. Prior to their installation we cooked in convection ovens which cooked meals for 30-40 minutes depending on if they were frozen. Now you're telling me I can do this in 3-5 minutes? We destroyed so many ...


5

Some of them were renamed/reorganized in 1989 based on proposals/petitions by the AOPA (referenced in FSIMS). 91.102 became 91.143 Flight limitation in the proximity of space flight operations. 91.104 became 91.141 Flight restrictions in the proximity of the Presidential and other parties 91.106/108/110/112/114 did not exist 91.116 became 91.175 Takeoff and ...


5

They said "TBM" "Three-Bravo-Victor" (3BV). TBM is the aircraft make, a TBM and 3BV is the last 3 letters of the callsign. The maneuver really isn't traffic avoidance so much as exactly what the controller said, spacing. They need to keep a minimum distance between traffic so having the TBM (a fast aircraft) perform an S-turn allows the aircraft in front of ...


5

I also know that a lot of people prefer to sell planes with fresh annuals. I think the reality (from what i have seen) is that a a lot of people end up selling planes with a fresh annual. Essentially any smart buyer is going to want a pre-buy inspection and they are often willing to pay for them. In many cases pre-buy inspections are close to if not the ...


5

"International" is supposed to be a code word to inform pilots and ATC that the Border Guards have a presence, and can admit you into the country: stamping passports, collecting duties, all that stuff. What you shouldn't do, say, is fly from Canada into Oswego County Airport, rent a car and drive over to Syracuse Hancock International to clear Customs/...


4

Currently, FAA's "fusion" software uses discrete squawk codes to merge targets generated by different surveillance systems, i.e. SSR (often several of them) and ADS-B. They plan to upgrade the software so it can merge targets based on Mode S hex code as well, but (as of early 2019) that hasn't been rolled out yet. Once that is in place, ATC will switch to ...


4

Another reason that carrier aircraft tend to be quite different from land based aircraft is the environment in which they operate: lots of salt. Consequently, carrier aircraft contain a much greater degree of corrosion resistant components, raising the price and in some cases the weight. Several naval aircraft have been adopted by land air forces. The USAF ...


4

No. The intent of the statute involves "assaulting or intimidating" a crew member. Passively failing to obey a crew member has no criminal liability nor does disobeying generic safety guidance given by crew members or aircraft literature. The actual statute reads like this (49 U.S.C. § 46504): An individual on an aircraft in the special aircraft ...


4

Yes you can request that on your call, generally if you don't the tower will ask how you will terminate/proceed at which point you will request closed traffic.


4

I have found this really varies by airport and even by FBO at a given airport. The only way to know is either to check their website or call in advance and find out. After a quick look I don't see any prices listed on their site. Often times the price is related to the services they provide by default. If you land and there is a marshaler waiting for you, ...


3

There are no "off-airport helipads" because a helipad is an airport. Actually, anywhere an aircraft lands is an airport as far as the FAA is concerned. It would be just like any other IFR to any other airport with no approach procedure: ATC can clear them for the visual approach if they have reasonable assurance that the weather at the airport is VFR, or the ...


3

You are required to verify the identity of people undergoing initial Sport Pilot, Recreational Pilot, Private Pilot, Instrument, and Multi Engine training. Any other kind of dual instruction does not require verification of US citizenship or TSA approval of resident aliens. See 49 CFR 1552.3(h). The CFI must inspect the original documents and verify they ...


3

Part of the reason is also historical. After World War II was over there was a large number of veterans with flying experience returning to a country that suddenly had a massive surplus of small trainer aircraft. While the US expended huge amounts of resources on World War II, it was largely untouched by the destruction that many other countries suffered. ...


3

After some digging and exploratory route planning in ForeFlight, it seems I've arrived at an answer that satisfies me: the last waypoint is listed as a transition only if the departure officially ends prior to it, and flying to the transition is optional. If there are other (more correct or plausible) answers, I'd still love to hear them. The text ...


3

There is no such thing as "Class C radar service". "Class C airspace" and "radar service" are mostly orthogonal. "Flight Following" is just shorthand for getting radar service when you're not required to. Terminal areas around a Class C airport generally comprise a 5-mile "inner ring", 10-mile "outer ring" and 20-mile "outer area". Approach is guaranteed ...


3

It is said that airplanes fly because of money and the Bernoulli effect, in that order. So the first cause is simply that there's a lot of wealth in the USA to support what is essentially a rich person's hobby. There are also a lot of airplanes still flying that were built during the boom years of aviation to support interest in the novelty of plane ...


3

1000 is a blockout code that prevents the ADS-B transmitter from also sending its discrete code, if you enter 1000 on your transponder no Mode 3/A code is sent in the ADS-B OUT message. Its part of AC-20-165B that outlines ADS-B Mode 3/A Code. Currently ATC automation relies on the Mode 3/A code to identify aircraft under radar surveillance and ...


3

According to the Public Relations Department at the Denver International Airport, as of May 24, 2019 there is no such pneumatic tube system at the airport. Hello Juan, Thank you for contacting Denver International Airport. We have evaluated your email. I spoke with airport operations to find out if they had any information on using a pneumatic ...


3

For FAA purposes you can log PIC time in the T6 because you hold a license in the airplane, single engine, land category and class. However, the USAF might not see it that way. Since you do not have an FAA license for the category and class multi engine land, you can only log PIC time for your solo flights in the T38.


3

In the USAF, it has, historically, been common for rated Navigators to be selected for pilot training, and possible, though less common, for young officers in other career tracks as well. That said, this process is competitive (so certainly not guaranteed for a particular individual), and dependent on the "needs of the service", so what is going on "now" ...


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