The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Hot answers tagged

45

It's technical, not political The F-35 was an attempt to do exactly what you propose, lowering costs by planned sharing of 80% of parts across variants, but it turns out that the USN's F-35C costs over twice as much as the USAF's F-35A, and only shares 20-25% of it's parts. The project has been a disaster practically since day one, and the services are ...


30

The FAA has an airmen inquiry search portal. I put Nathalie Brown and came up with Nathalie Myrtle Brown with the following details: Certificate: PRIVATE PILOT Date of Issue: 11/25/1968 Ratings: PRIVATE PILOT AIRPLANE SINGLE ENGINE LAND AIRPLANE MULTIENGINE LAND INSTRUMENT AIRPLANE As @FredLarson points out in comments ...


24

That direction (284) is the true heading, but runways are numbered according to the magnetic heading. Runways are usually numbered according to their direction, more precisely called runway magnetic bearing or QFU (see Q codes). (How are runways numbered?) For KTEX: 276 magnetic, 285 true 096 magnetic, 105 true While 276 should be rounded to runway ...


18

In countries outside of the US, 7777 may be used by test transponders (RABMs) to check correctness of radar stations (BITE). e.g. on top of a mountain. In the US, it seems that it is used as well on active air defense missions without ATC clearance. This would mean that the interceptor aircraft would change it's squawk to 7777 for the military/civilian air ...


17

The YF-17 is the answer to your question. It is the predecessor to the F/A-18, and was designed as a land-based fighter. The YF-17 is much lighter than the F/A-18, because it does not need to carry equipment for carrier landings. Adding this equipment makes the aircraft heavier, compromising performance. You then need to compensate for the added weight, but ...


16

Based on my current navigation database (AIRAC 1909, valid from 2019-08-15), I found 7 US airports with 4 (or more) parallel runways: KATL (Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport): 5 parallel runways: 08L/26R, 08R/26L, 09L/27R, 09R/27L, 10/28 KDEN (Denver International Airport): 4 parallel runways: 16L/34R, 16R/34L, 17L/35R, 17R/35L and 2 more ...


11

If the aircraft was taken off the US registry and registered in Brazil, the answer is no. You have to reverse the process to put it back into the US registry, and until it is, you can't ask for a ferry permit from the FAA. For the benefit of those who may not know the process: A request is made in Brazil to deregister the aircraft, with a note to send a ...


11

The needs to operate on a carrier are different than the needs for a land based aircraft. They are subtle, but significant. As others have pointed out, the F-35 attempted to address these issues and wound up way over budget. (It was made even more complicated by the addition of a STOVL version for the Marines, the F-35B). CATOBAR aircraft differ from ...


9

In North America, just buy an air-band radio and listen to Raleigh-Durham tower all you like, or if your ham unit receives the aviation VHF frequencies, do that. Or find it on LiveATC.net It's only illegal to broadcast without authorization, not listen in.


7

From the ATC Orders 3-1-9(b)(4): Unless otherwise authorized, tower radar displays are intended to be an aid to local controllers in meeting their responsibilities to the aircraft operating on the runways or within the surface area. They are not intended to provide radar benefits to pilots except for those accrued through a more efficient and ...


6

According to the AIM 4-1-20(e): Under no circumstances should a pilot of a civil aircraft operate the transponder on Code 7777. This code is reserved for military interceptor operations. The ATC orders don't add anything useful and a lot of security procedures are classified, or at least not publicly available on faa.gov. But it seems from that ...


6

Jim S asks an interesting question. Can ATC ask you to do something which is contrary to the regulations? The answer is they can, and just because they do, does not change the regulations. The practice of advising aircraft to switch to advisory frequency and squawk VFR is common here, in Class C airspace, and I have experienced it in Class B airspace as ...


6

You may wish to contact FAA Airmen Records in OKC. They will likely have the record. They are retained indefinitely. It will likely have been pruned from the current database, since she does not hold a current medical. The Date of Issue of certificates is not always the original date of issuance. It is merely the date the FAA made a record update which ...


6

Product liability destroyed this industry. In the 1970s GA aircraft were much less expensive. A midrange model cost about twice the annual salary of the average US worker. Annual production was about 14k per year. Then attorneys found out that juries could be persuaded to award ten times as much for a death in a small airplane as for the equivalent death ...


5

I flew for TWA International from 1970-1990. We had microwave ovens on all of our 747's. It took a long time to train the older F/A's on their operation. Prior to their installation we cooked in convection ovens which cooked meals for 30-40 minutes depending on if they were frozen. Now you're telling me I can do this in 3-5 minutes? We destroyed so many ...


5

As @RonBeyer notes in the comments Flight Following will drop you when you land. Generally (also as Ron notes) they will ask you to call the "field in sight". It really depends on where you are and what kind of air space you are in. Where I fly in the Northeast they typically drop you when you have the field in sight but its hard to stray to far from a ...


5

On Pilotweb, there's a "Federal NOTAM System (FNS)" section on the right side of the screen. If you select "NOTAM Search" it takes you to another NOTAM search tool. If you then select "Archive" from the drop-down list, you can search by date and location.


5

https://www.nps.gov/deva/learn/management/rules-and-regulations.htm says you would have to have special permission. 36 CFR §2.17 – AIRCRAFT and AIR DELIVERY (a)(1) The use of aircraft on lands or waters within the park other than at locations designated by special regulations is prohibited. Death Valley’s special regulations at 36 CFR 7.26(e) ...


5

The requirement to maintain two-way radio communications is FAR 91.130(c). But regulations have to be read as parts of a whole. Read 91.130(a), which says: Unless otherwise authorized by ATC, each aircraft operation in Class C airspace must be conducted in compliance with this section... "Frequency Change Approved" is ATC authorization to deviate from ...


5

Some of them were renamed/reorganized in 1989 based on proposals/petitions by the AOPA (referenced in FSIMS). 91.102 became 91.143 Flight limitation in the proximity of space flight operations. 91.104 became 91.141 Flight restrictions in the proximity of the Presidential and other parties 91.106/108/110/112/114 did not exist 91.116 became 91.175 Takeoff and ...


5

They said "TBM" "Three-Bravo-Victor" (3BV). TBM is the aircraft make, a TBM and 3BV is the last 3 letters of the callsign. The maneuver really isn't traffic avoidance so much as exactly what the controller said, spacing. They need to keep a minimum distance between traffic so having the TBM (a fast aircraft) perform an S-turn allows the aircraft in front of ...


5

I also know that a lot of people prefer to sell planes with fresh annuals. I think the reality (from what i have seen) is that a a lot of people end up selling planes with a fresh annual. Essentially any smart buyer is going to want a pre-buy inspection and they are often willing to pay for them. In many cases pre-buy inspections are close to if not the ...


4

Another reason that carrier aircraft tend to be quite different from land based aircraft is the environment in which they operate: lots of salt. Consequently, carrier aircraft contain a much greater degree of corrosion resistant components, raising the price and in some cases the weight. Several naval aircraft have been adopted by land air forces. The USAF ...


4

Reference 47 CFR 87.213. Attempting to direct air traffic via Unicom is illegal, I would report that. (c) Unicoms must not be used for air traffic control (ATC) purposes other than to relay ATC information between the pilot and air traffic controller. Relaying of ATC information is limited to the following: Revisions of proposed departure time; ...


4

Currently, FAA's "fusion" software uses discrete squawk codes to merge targets generated by different surveillance systems, i.e. SSR (often several of them) and ADS-B. They plan to upgrade the software so it can merge targets based on Mode S hex code as well, but (as of early 2019) that hasn't been rolled out yet. Once that is in place, ATC will switch to ...


4

No. The intent of the statute involves "assaulting or intimidating" a crew member. Passively failing to obey a crew member has no criminal liability nor does disobeying generic safety guidance given by crew members or aircraft literature. The actual statute reads like this (49 U.S.C. § 46504): An individual on an aircraft in the special aircraft ...


4

Yes you can request that on your call, generally if you don't the tower will ask how you will terminate/proceed at which point you will request closed traffic.


3

Flight Following is intended to track your flight from time of activation to reaching your destination. It provides for ATC services which include traffic advisories, and emergency services. It is expected to terminate at point of landing. That said, depending upon workload, some TRACONs will provide flight following which continues through approaches or ...


3

Federal registration is for three years, according to the FAA (the actual regulations are in 14 CFR 47.40): Aircraft registration issued due to renewal expires three years from the expiration date of the previous certificate. Aircraft registration issued to a new, import, or reinstated aircraft entering or re-entering the U.S. Civil Aircraft Register ...


3

The "Lowest Usable Flight Level" ("Transition Level" [TL] - term used outside North America) is FL180 when the (local) altimeter setting within a controller's area of jurisdiction is 29.92 inHG or greater. This is normally, not necessarily always, the province of ARTCC controllers in the U.S. Your Questions: Is the entire US using the same TL at any ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible