Hot answers tagged

41

I’ve chatted with a few F-14 pilots who are members of the Tomcat Association, aviation museum curators, as well as former NFWS Topgun instructor Dave “Bio” Baranak about the possibility of getting one or two F-14 airframes flying again. The depressing conclusion we have all come to is that it is almost impossible for this to happen. Multiple F-14 pilots, ...


32

The objective is very important. You don't build an airplane because you want one faster or cheaper. Neither is the case. The kit won't be cheaper, and it'll take 1 to 2 thousand manhours, minimum, of your time (take the building time claim of any kit and double or triple it to get reality). You build one for the experience of building one. A lot of ...


22

Wasabi's answer is not correct, or at least not fully correct. You actually ask two questions: does a military controller need to take additional tests and training to get hired, and do they need additional training to work as a civilian controller. The answers, respectively, are "no" and "yes." The hiring practices change every so often, ...


18

My humble advice is to take a single introductory flight in the Cessna 150 to galvanize your interest and increase your motivation. Go to ground school first and then (preferably) start your flight training (in the C150) in earnest once you have the time and money available to take lessons on a regular schedule (once a week minimum, three times a week ...


15

At least in the "jurisdiction" I'm somewhat familiar with, EASA and my country, licences are required for both the radio device and the operator of the radio. The training required for personal licence is not that hard, consisting of legal stuff, theory and learning the standard phraseology for radiotelephony. Once the personal licence is acquired,...


14

The big disadvantages of a kit: it will take you years to have an airplane ready to fly, and you'll be flying an airplane built by a novice builder. The main advantage of a kit: you (often) don't need all the money up front. Buy the fuselage kit, build it. Then buy the wing kit, and build that. Not all kit planes are sold this way, but several are. No ...


14

This article from AOPA outlines the issues with ADHD pretty well. This article is from Canada but the medical policies are quite similar and you might find the basic information useful. Bottom line seems to be that once you are formally diagnosed with the condition, that becomes a problem. You can't be on ADHD medications at all (within the last 6 months) ...


14

As a former FAA ATC'er, National Association of Rocketry high-power Level 3 certificate holder, and the facility approver guy for high-power rocketry waivers in our facility airspace, if you are in the USA, you do NOT have a temporary flight restriction (TFR) for your rocket launch, but instead you have an FAR waiver and a notice to airmen (NOTAM). This ...


13

The other answers are good, there's a couple of aspects that haven't been covered that I'll touch on in my answer. Safety: Kitplanes have a higher rate of accidents overall than certified airplanes. There's a good article from kitplanes magazine that breaks down causes, it's not authoritative but it's extremely useful in showing the differences in accidents ...


12

This question is unanswerable in its present state. A glider is a certified and registered aircraft in the US. Ultralights are not register aircraft in the US. And, they are not typically in contact with ATC. Autonomous drone taxis have yet to receive FAA certification, airworthiness, and registration. So, the best manufacturers can do with drones at this ...


12

CANPASS gives a streamlined entry into Canada, allowing you to land at a port of entry and just report by phone. To go into the US, you need an eAPIS account. I think that with eAPIS you still need to meet in person with a customs person. A friend in Montreal used eAPIS to travel to Vermont regularly. He said it was a lot of hassle to get set up and go ...


9

Since VFR flight plans are only used for SAR, and your route would only matter if you aren’t talking to ATC, I would file the route you intend to take if ATC denies you the B transition—or refuses to talk to you entirely. If they do talk to you and grant the transition, then there will be a clear record of your actual path, and nobody will bother to look at (...


9

Due to the ongoing runway incursion epidemic, US ATC must hear every aircraft read back certain instructions, including callsign. If you don’t read them back correctly, they’re required to repeat the instruction until you do. No matter how many times it takes. When this rule was first adopted (or at least enforced), a shocking number of pilots couldn’t give ...


9

Speaking from my Canadian experience: You require a radio operator's license to transmit on frequencies used in aviation. Getting a license involves passing a knowledge test, after which the license is good for life. The required knowledge to pass the test would probably answer all of your questions. As I recall, it was a pretty easy test to pass. Among ...


9

FAA's Facility Operation and Administration says (emphasis mine): Part-time facilities must establish procedures for opening and closing their facilities. The procedures must be coordinated with the facility having IFR jurisdiction and must include, as a minimum, the following: a. Broadcast an announcement upon resuming/terminating service on appropriate ...


8

Unfortunately, no. There are simply too many people who would abuse such a permit to commit crimes for either country to accept the risk. You will need a stop at a Port of Entry or User Fee (US) airport in each direction to clear customs and immigration, but at least it should be quick since you are a citizen of both countries, and there appear to be several ...


8

In answer to your specific question, as I understand you are asking, I would just put in the intended route (e.g., Bay Shore Transition) in the "route of flight" section and the route outside of class B airspace in the "Other Information" section.(annotating it as another potential route you might fly). But keep in mind, for a VFR flight, ...


8

The CTAF frequencies 122.7, 122.8 and 122.9 are called MULTICOM because they are deliberately not specific to one airport. These frequencies are holdovers from the days of 100kHz radios, when we didn’t have frequencies to spare. They’re also easy to remember and recognize. Today, MULTICOM is still used for low-traffic airports, so there shouldn’t be too much ...


7

No. /X (VOR only), /D (VOR/DME only), /Y (LORAN only), and /M (TACAN only) aircraft do not have transponders. Primary-only aircraft can be assigned flight plans, and fly IFR. It's not common, though, because aircraft that will fly within 30 miles of class B airspace, or aircraft that will operate above 10,000 feet MSL are required to be equipped with ...


7

Highly unlikely. There were only two operators of the F-14: the US and Iran. When the US decommissioned theirs in 2006, aside from a few stripped airframes in museums, they were all destroyed to prevent their parts making their way to Iran. If Iran somehow has any flyable planes left in another 30-40 years despite not being able to get any parts to repair ...


7

Yes, it's legal. The FAA has an amateur-built aircraft homepage with links to regulations, guidance etc. It's also very common. The Experimental Aircraft Association has a lot of resources too.


7

I believe it's because the beacon doesn't operate continuously. The FAA Aeronautical Chart Users' Guide says: The symbol [...] indicates the existence of a rotating or flashing airport beacon operating from dusk to dawn. However, KSAC's beacon doesn't operate from dusk to dawn; pilots have to activate it using CTAF, in the same way they can activate pilot ...


6

Spirit XXX (Number) and Callsigns are different. Spirit Number is the order of having flown the B-2. This Covers Pilots and VIP, journalist or having been reward with this incentive flights. eg. Spirit 1: July 17, 1989: B. J. Hinds, Northrop’s chief B-2 test pilot, Spirit 2: July 17, 1989: Col. R. S. Couch "Rick" USAF First Co-pilot This is ...


6

I will second @StephenS's image as the best you're likely to find with minimal effort. In fact there are a few of these images available if you do an image search for "FAA STARS TAMR" and I've included all of them at the bottom of this answer. Real answer If you need the specific boundaries you can submit a FOIA request. If you're a private citizen ...


6

Flight training nowadays is based on WWII-era programs that had the aim of mass producing pilots. Downside is that nowadays 40% of those who start training, don't get their PPLs (planeandpilotmag.com). AOPA looked into this issue, and the top reform proposal to fix that is: [Establishing] a standardized training syllabus that is carefully followed — AOPA ...


5

You seem to be confused about a couple of things. To clear everything up and reiterate some of what was said in other answers: US military aircraft do not have "N-numbers" but they do have registration numbers (Bureau Numbers or BuNos). Just like civil airliners, which have N-numbers but usually use callsigns and flight numbers instead, military ...


5

Short Answer: Flight 634 LAS-PHL at 0645 was most likely "US Air 634" on those dates, while flight 634 LAS-PIT at 2257 was most likely "America West 634" on those dates. Even if both were to have flown with the ATC callsign "Cactus 634," that wouldn't be a problem for ATC since they were separated in time by several hours. (No ...


5

Aviation can be very unforgiving at times. One of the ways to deal with that are so-called idiot proof systems. Checklists are a good example. The reason we use them is not to help us remember what to do, but to make it impossible for us to forget what to do, as long as we can get ourselves to remember to use the checklists. "Read back all instructions&...


5

Short answer; Basically all of them, but for the 7 landing slot airports you might need to pre-arrange your arrival. It really depends what is going on at the airport, how willing you are to pay the fees, and if you feel confident handling the radio chatter as well as some possibly complicated taxi instructions. Pretty much all airports support some kind of ...


4

Right now, Mogas is the only alternative fuel because the unleaded avgas program still seems to be going nowhere, although the industry testing program is supposed to restart this year. You could put an aircraft diesel engine in your plane if you're rich, and run it on Jet A, but if you can afford that, you can probably afford other alternatives as well. The ...


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