Hot answers tagged

87

The short answer seems to be that some countries have persuaded Google to blur out specific areas for "national security" reasons. Wikipedia has an article on it with some more (limited!) information. Interestingly, I couldn't find any official Google article on blurring in Maps, apart from some general references to Street View. And, as it turns out, Street ...


82

This is to ensure that there is space for all equipment around the aircraft. It's not critical to the centimeter, but if it's off by a meter or more there may be problems. For example, the tail may stick out into the taxiway behind or the nose may stick into the service road in front of the aircraft. While most aircraft stop with the nose wheel on or very ...


64

Gradual relocation essentially mean having to staff and equip nearly two full airports during the transition period. It is also annoying for the travelers that want to transfer planes and need to relocate to the other airport. They would then need to get transported to or from the new location and through security again unless a small short hop flight is ...


56

Runways are usually numbered according to their direction, more precisely called runway magnetic bearing or QFU (see Q codes). Consider a plane flying toward the runway on final approach in a day without any wind. Divide its magnetic heading by 10, round it to the nearest whole number and you'll usually get the runway number. For example, if the magnetic ...


56

Can you? Absolutely, and air traffic control will treat you (almost) like any other airplane. You are supposedly handled on a first-come-first-serve basis (reality is slightly different with different aircraft speeds, etc.). Do the airlines like it if you slow them down? No, but it's part of the system and the way that it works. Very often, there are ...


55

Background The Sequenced Flashing Lights are part of some approach lighting systems and are a row of strobe lights that flash in sequence to direct the pilots eyes to the runway. They are useful in conditions of bad weather, as they quickly catch the eye and help the pilot locate the runway threshold which might otherwise be hidden; however, during normal ...


54

Windsocks come in various sizes and speeds, but an FAA Standard Wind Sock aligns with the wind at 3 knots, and is fully extended at 15 knots like CGCampbell pointed out. A typical wind sock (at least around here) looks something like this: The stripes are actually useful: The first stripe indicates a 3-knot breeze (The wind sock has turned and aligned ...


53

The approach to Paro is unbelievably complicated. It is flown visually through a valley with high mountains all around and no sight of the airport until the last moment. Here is a cut of a map with the approach paths: Approach to runway 15, marked in red, is worse in this regard. The ridge is rather close to the airport, so the final turn usually ends over ...


53

There are numerous joint use (commercial/military) airports with separate terminals/ramp areas. There aren't many where there are two connected fields. The only one I'm aware of is Naval Air Station Whiting Field near Milton FL that has two operational fields with separate identifiers. There is NAS Whiting Field - North. ICAO: KNSE and NAS Whiting Field - ...


47

I worked for 3 years as a ramp agent and there are two reasons: Jet bridges and safety. Jet bridges have plenty of leeway, but not a lot. This gets worse in winter because those things hardly move at all with ice. Some jet bridges are poorly engineered, some are old. The painting on the ground tells the marshaller where to park the aircraft. By putting ...


43

Yes, we can ask you to plan your landing roll in a certain way. We won't technically instruct you to brake the aircraft in a specific way, but simply to aim for a specific taxiway after landing. There can be different reasons for this, but generally it is an attempt to expedite traffic flow on the ground at the airport. For example, if you are landing on a ...


43

I think Chitose and New Chitose on Japan's Hokkaido island fit the criteria. One is an air base (Chitose) with ICAO code RJCJ, while the other is the island's primary civilian airport (New Chitose) with ICAO code RJCC. They have separate runways, but they're jointly operated and linked by taxiways. It's quite cool watching the air base's jets while you're ...


41

Apparently you aren't the only person who wondered this; the FAA actually has it in an FAQ: What is the significance of a runway 8069 feet in length and why are two different aerodrome symbols used to depict hard surface runways on Sectional charts? For purposes of airport depiction, specialists represent a runway between 7970 and 8069 feet in ...


41

Moving airline by airline doesn't help that much: You still have the same chaos, just on a per-airline basis. The airports you mention are dominated by large carriers that have turned them into hubs (Turkish Airlines and Lufthansa). Even if you move all the other airlines one by one, you still have much of the pain of the big move when you move the largest ...


39

In addition to what vasin mentioned in his answer, a mechanic from O'Hare mentioned hearing ATC direct aircraft to go there when they weren't ready for takeoff by the time they got to the runway in a comment on the video that prompted the linked question: They [the pilot of the aircraft not yet ready for departure] sheepishly called and told the tower ...


39

That is a plane being used to train/practice landings. It is without passengers and one of the pilots is training. There will also be another pilot on board, possibly two, providing support and checking that the trainee is performing their duties according to the manual.


37

The two original short runways (shown above) were actually abandoned c. 1955 in favor of a brand new longer runway built into the bay (completed 1958) to accommodate the new jetliner (the 13/31 you know). The year also saw the start of work on a $110,000,000 project to revolutionize Kai Tak Airport by the construction of a 7,200-ft runway on an artificial ...


36

My favourite entry in my logbook is 2013-08-02 KOSH-KORD 1.5 hrs – from Air Venture in Oshkosh straight into Chicago O'Hare, in a Cessna 172 :-) A friend of mine and I have flown into SFO (with our instructor), and dropped of my friend, who then took a Lufthansa flight to Munich. So, having flown into SFO, ORD, and SAN (San Diego, the busiest single-runway ...


36

Here in the United States these are called blast fences. They protect whatever may be behind them from the direct effects of jet blast by directing the blast upwards.


36

The answer appears to be "yes", but unless you're transferring directly from the private jet to/from an international flight in/out of Heathrow, it's a poor choice. Fees are high and delays are common. With no fewer than 13 other airports to choose from, chances are that one of the others will be a better choice. Luton and Farnborough are the most popular ...


36

"RTF Instructions" probably means "Radiotelephone Instructions" As suggested here, it should not be confused (as I initially did) with the "RTF" of internet fame (from RTFM, for those that are still wondering after reading the translation below), meaning something completely different: Ophelia und ich, die beide mehr Ahnung vom Internet als von der ...


35

As described by FAA, it seems like it is for holding aircraft when gate is not available: The Penalty Box is located adjacent to the terminal perimeter Taxiway B, east of Concourse C. Arriving aircraft typically use this position to wait for gate clearing. The pad is able to accommodate ADG IV and smaller aircraft (i.e., no heavy jets with the exception ...


35

The airports that feature this parking orientation are of small size, with the apron (or part of it) very close to the runway. Taking Dortmund Airport as an example: When an aircraft of a certain size (for example Airbus A319, Boeing 737) reaches one of the parking positions 5-12, it is pushed backwards into its parking position. The engines are switched ...


35

There are automated systems that provide the same function as a marshal. They are in place at some airports but not all since upgrades cost money and not all airports may see a use for it. At smaller fields marshals often serve multiple roles aside from just guiding aircraft they may also handle baggage, pump fuel, drive tugs and all the other various ramp ...


34

That "road" is in fact a taxilane, and marked as such on the Paine Field side (note the yellow lead lines marked at the bottom of the image below, you would find on a taxiway). It connects the Boeing plant to Paine Field's "Boeing Ramp" where final prep can be completed before the aircraft are flown off to wherever they're going. The terminology is ...


34

The airports in Berlin share runways. Strictly speaking, one of them (BER) isn't really operational... But it will be. Soon. For sure... Hey, look over there: a monkey with two heads!! google maps


33

How are aircraft aligned with these bridges They are not (but read on) Aircraft are aligned to a point on the concrete, not to the jetbridge(s). It is the jetbridge itself that carries out the final alignment to the aircraft door. Jetbridges are actually motor vehicles with wheels, tyres, motors and (often) steering. It just happens that their rear end ...


33

They have Mode-S transponders / ADS-B transmitters specifically for vehicles such a the ERA SQUID, Thales MOSQUITO or Saab Sensis VeeLoPDF. Typically vehicles that operate on taxiways and runways are equipped with such transponders, which ensures the vehicles can be tracked by the Advanced Surface Movement Guidance and Control System (A-SMGCS). Vehicles ...


33

Gradually moving between airports is a living nightmare for connecting travelers. Exactly that was done at Montreal Mirabel airport, a fabulous, spacious new replacement airport for Montreal Dorval (Trudeau). Montreal used to be Canada's main international hub. International flights were banned from the old airport, as incentive for airlines to move all ...


32

This is a ground power unit (GPU) which supplies the aircraft with electricity while the generators or the auxiliary power unit (APU) are not running. This is important especially during boarding, when the cabin lighting needs to remain on for passengers to embark or disembark. The GPU is also used to start the APU, which in turn provides electricity to ...


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