40

It's a bad idea to give false information to a controller as a matter of practice. Instead of calling yourself a student when you're not, it would be better to say you're unfamiliar with the area or that your English is not perfect. Controllers are almost always accommodating to less-than-proficient pilots and will usually make allowances whenever time and ...


33

Assuming a regular private pilot's license (i.e. not sport/recreation), a part 61 instructor, and a rented aircraft, then you need to budget for the following: Aircraft rental (this usually includes oil and fuel) Instructor time (air and ground) Materials (books, DVDs, charts, fuel tester etc.) as recommended by your instructor Headset Third-class medical ...


33

You are asking the wrong question. Ask yourself this: Do I really want to become a pilot? If the answer is yes, then you can become a pilot. You only require hard work, and a lot of money (but we are not talking about this). Having talent is subjective. Sometimes you try to learn something new and you get into that relatively quickly. Sometimes you don't. ...


30

Well, you screwed up, but nobody got hurt, no metal was bent, and since the tower didn't yell at you presumably you didn't obviously endanger anyone's safety (though there's always some level of risk when an aircraft isn't where the tower expects it to be). As far as deviations go, that's not good, but it's not terrible. The tower was probably expecting ...


30

Almost every pilot learns to fly in an actual aircraft, this is one of the reasons all trainers have dual controls. My first day out, ever, was in an actual plane, behind real controls, in the sky. No sim-time prior to that. The instructor talked me though takeoff and maneuvers (keeping an eye on everything and operating the rudder). All he did was radio ...


29

When pilots are trained for flying in an aircraft type they have not flown in before, they go through type rating, then line training. During the type rating, they learn where all the instruments and buttons are, what starts which system, how the plane behaves, how to land and auto-land etc. During line training, they spend time in the cockpit together with ...


28

Supposedly, this is because in the early days of flight before intercoms were common instructors used to sit behind their students in a tandem aircraft and pull on their shirt tails to give directions. After successfully soloing, the student has shown that he doesn't need that direction any more and therefore doesn't need his shirt in one piece either. This ...


26

I don't belive there is any regulation against it. Keep in mind you may need to show the book to officials at some point so keeping it professional is not a terrible idea (1) Persons must present their pilot certificate, medical certificate, logbook, or any other record required by this part for inspection upon a reasonable request by - (i) The ...


22

Simulators have been in use since the late-20's. Link's first military sales came as a result of the Air Mail scandal, when the Army Air Corps took over carriage of U.S. Air Mail. Twelve pilots were killed in a 78-day period due to their unfamiliarity with Instrument Flying Conditions. They have been invaluable in teaching instrument flying and emergency ...


21

The minimum required hours of instruction is 40 hours. How many will you need to get the license? That depends on a lot of factors. Very few students are good enough at 40 hours to pass the practical test. If you can only fly once per week, you will "forget" some of what you learned on the last lesson. "Forget" is in quotes because some of the ...


16

A bit of talent surely helps, but most important is the ability to learn and show progress. A friend of mine had to do six simulator tests before he was admitted to the flight academy of his choice. Each one was a little bit more complicated than the previous one. After five tests he had perfectly demonstrated to lack any talent and they were about to fail ...


16

There is no evidence to back the claim that the first solo ride of the student is more dangerous compared to the later ones. US NIH conducted a study on the accidents with solo pilots, which doesn't indicate that first-time solo fliers are any more prone to accident than others. Aircraft accidents with student pilots flying solo: analysis of 390 cases by ...


15

Yes, you should be logging from the start. Now for the first few lessons, it'd be ok to not have your own logbook yet, but you should get one. Hopefully your instructor has kept his up to date, and can build your logbook in terms of flight times since you started.


14

This is an excellent question and at the same time, very broad. Every student and pilot can give you a ton of advice about what qualities the best CFI must have. I will list a few qualities to look for and then guide you to a few resources which can further elaborate the topic. I presume you are going for Part 61 (14CFR61.159). I also presume that you have ...


14

Unfortunately, you have to report it. It even says so right on the medical application (emphasis added by me): 18) Medical History - HAVE YOU EVER IN YOUR LIFE BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH, HAD, OR DO YOU PRESENTLY HAVE ANY OF THE FOLLOWING? Answer "yes" or "no" for every condition listed below (All "yes" answers require a comment. Click Add Comments to add ...


14

You need 2 things before you can start flight training in the U.S.: An appropriate visa. A tourist visa (B2), business visa (B1) or VWP (Visa Waiver Program) is not accepted TSA clearance through the Alien Flight Student Program (AFSP) The complete process is documented at the AOPA website. In a nutshell, this is what you need to do: Make sure you have a ...


14

The memory aid is PARE: POWER to idle AILERONS neutral RUDDER on the floor opposite the direction of spin ELEVATOR nose-down to break the stall You will want to read the full explanation in the Pilots Operating Handbook or POH for an understanding of the steps and why you need to take them. Commit the sequence above to memory and better yet get spin ...


14

The answer depends on which country you are in. Under FAA regulations (and those countries that generally follow FAA rules), there is no requirement for you to actually fly the actual aircraft before taking passengers on a trip. Under EU/EASA regulations, there is a default requirement, which is flown on a aircraft with instructors and fellow student pilots....


13

(I recognize that this question is now 3 years old, but since GreenAsJade resurrected it...!) If we're speaking about controllers working at a tower at your own airport, it might be worthwhile to call the tower on the phone, identify yourself as the pilot of N1234X, and ask if you could visit them. Of course, be respectful of their time (don't call when ...


13

It's not really bad at all. How do we know? Because the ATC didn't intervene or question you. What emerges for me out of this report is that you need a new CFI. Getting angry at a student's innocent mistake is bad. In particular if it is not something you've been cautioned about before (have you?). Communicating angry feedback by text is even worse. A ...


13

It will not work in EASA for a variety of reasons. Of the top of my head: Like Lnafziger mentioned, you will need to do at least 10 hours solo. Most jet engines (but the smallest such as the D-Jet) have a minimum required crew of two. Also, you are not allowed to switch airplanes in the PPL course (ie. fly solo with one airplane and dual with another see ...


12

Often uncontrolled fields will publish a preferred calm wind runway in the Airport/Facility Directory. When one isn't published the calm wind runway is usually the longest runway, which gives you a 50/50 chance at guessing right. To further reduce your likelihood of winding up face to face with another arriving aircraft you should self-announce on the CTAF ...


11

I added mine up after I finished, and it came to about \$12,000 over about 18 months. I didn't push myself to finish as cheaply or quickly as possible. I think I finished around 55 hours. (I also flew out of a relatively expensive airport/region) If cost is a major factor, you can find ways to trim some costs. Basically, every moment you spend preparing, ...


11

Like anything, a combination of talent and effort is usually required to become proficient and/or master a complex skill. The less talent you have, the more work you need to get to the same level as someone with more innate talent. Your instructor is probably adopting the mindset that the commercial airlines get to pick the best of the best, so they will ...


11

This will vary for every airspace so lets go over them in descending order. Class B (Bravo): First off, keep in mind for your future solos that as a student pilot you are not allowed to fly solo in class B airspace unless your instructor has given you training and a logbook endorsement for that specific class B (see 14 CFR 61.95). But if your instructor is ...


11

(Source) The basics Height: absolute height above ground, measured using a radar altimeter (like the helicopter on the right) QFE: the barometric setting an airport broadcasts that makes an altimeter on ground read zero. This gives height only around the airport if the area is relatively flat. Also known as Above Field Elevation QNH: the barometric setting ...


10

This is one of those cases where your instructor should have encouraged you to talk to an FAA medical certification expert before you talk to an AME (something like AOPA's "Pilot Protection Services") so they can help you get everything in order. You've already talked to an AME, but you can still use those same resources to help you deal with their ...


10

It's hard to give you specific advice for India because I'm not familiar with the regulations and standards there (your best bet would be to give the DGCA a call and ask if they have any publications you can review). Broadly speaking all countries are going to expect you to know much of the same material however (because all airplanes essentially fly the ...


10

In case of an engine failure, the fixed wing pilots natural reaction is to push forward to lower the nose, then look for the correct glide airspeed. A helicopter pilot in most engine failures should pull back (although not agressively) to load the disc and restore, or increase rotor RPM. Maintaining rotor RPM is the only way to get to the ground safely so ...


10

I'm assuming you're asking about the US, since you mentioned sport/recreational licenses. You can take as long as you like to learn to fly, although spreading it out over multiple years will actually cost more, not less. The reason is that you forget things and take a lot longer to develop the right reactions, muscle memory and feel for the aircraft. So try ...


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