81

While still in the airspace, you should contact the controller if you can, since it may be important to safety. After landing, you may get the dreaded phone number from a controller (probably tower or ground) which you're supposed to call and speak with someone from the FAA. You should not volunteer any information about the incident during this call ...


50

I've done it three times in 1200 hours of flying, I must admit. First time, my plane was performing better than usual (conditions were just right) and I nicked the SFO airspace on climb-out. About 20 minutes later, they called me with a phone number to call when I landed. Spent the rest of the flight shitting bricks. When I got to my destination, I was ...


39

To give an example of how flights can be affected by this in ways to make them impossible, Iranian airspace is closed from sunset to sunrise (unless things have changed recently). Any aircraft that due to the closure of Pakistani airspace would need to cross Iranian airspace and be unable to do so because of that closure now needs to be cancelled or ...


37

Just call up ATC on the approach frequency and request flight following to see the location you're interested in. They'll assign you a transponder code and any restrictions. For example: N12345: "Houston approach, VFR request for Cessna 12345" Houston TRACON: "Cessna 345, say request" N12345: "Cessna 12345 is at 1200 ft, 3 miles south of ...


37

FAR 91.3 states that any pilot in command may deviate from any regulation or rules to the extent needed to deal with the emergency. That includes entering restricted or prohibited airspace. In the example that you suggested, yes you could do so and land at the Groom Lake flight test facility at KXTA, provided you could reach their controllers or contact ...


33

VFR aviation maps called "sectionals" (and now GPS map displays) depict the types of airspace through borders with different colors and dashed lines. You can buy or download the maps for free from this FAA site. It is always the responsibility of a pilot to know where they are and follow all applicable laws. In the US, a pilot that breaks a rule because ...


30

ICAO Class F airspace is a bit of an odd duck (and the US FAA is apparently not the only agency that thinks so - from a quick check on Wikipedia it seems more jurisdictions ignore class F than implement it. They only mention Class F as being in use in Germany and the UK). From a functional/regulatory standpoint Class F is a sort of hybrid between "Class E" ...


28

You recall correctly. That document is ICAO SARPs Annex 11 § 2.6: Where the ATS airspaces adjoin vertically, i.e. one above the other, flights at a common level would comply with requirements of, and be given services applicable to, the less restrictive class of airspace. In applying these criteria, Class B airspace is therefore considered less ...


27

The answer is: no, normal flights are not allowed under the canyon rim. If you look at the sectional chart, you see this notice: Searching through the CFR (Title 14, Part 91) brings up this Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50-2 - Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of the Grand Canyon National Park, AZ. Ther is also Supbart U of Part 93. The ...


26

Even if ATC can't legally give you permission to enter prohibited airspace (they sometimes can for restricted airspace by the way), if you declare an emergency they will still coordinate with the controlling agency which will help to keep you safe. Squawk 7700, fly as high as possible, turn on all your lights, broadcast your intentions on 121.5 if you ...


25

In the US you have, effectively, zero rights over the airspace above your land by default: Control of airspace is entirely delegated to the FAA, and they're super serious about it. If you designate your land as an airport you can certainly establish a control tower and request an airspace designation from the FAA - whether or not they approve your plan ...


24

It is likely the result of the maritime boundary dispute between Russia and Norway. The delimitation agreement has been signed only in 2010. (Source: BBC) ICAO seems to want to resolve this issue of missing FIR: 8.1 IATA brought the attention of the Group to a portion of airspace of unassigned responsibility, extending from the North Pole over the ...


21

It means that the airspace around the airport is still under review after a proposed change. This article explains it in more detail: http://expertaviator.com/2012/07/31/what-is-an-objectionable-airport/ And here's the official text: Part 157 §157.7 FAA determinations. (a) The FAA will conduct an aeronautical study of an airport proposal and, after ...


21

Although Lnafziger's answer is correct, I'd like to elaborate on the purpose of the airspace classes. Class A: This airspace is intended for high-speed, point to point travel. That is why pilots flying in Class A must be instrument rated and in contact with air traffic control (ATC); aircraft above 18,000 feet are likely to travel quickly and may not have ...


20

Use of a sectional chart and pilotage. You will have to be aware of where you are using ground references while cross referencing where the boundaries of controlled airspace lies in relation to those references. For example if you’re flying around to the west of John Tune (KJWN) airport in Nashville, TN and will notice the river bends near the airport. ...


19

The short version, for non-aviation people is as follows: Class A: All Airspace above 18,000 ft. Anybody flying here must receive a clearance from, be talking to, and be controlled by ATC. Class B: Airspace within approximately 30 miles and 10,000 feet of the ground around the busiest airports in the US. Again, anybody flying here must receive a clearance ...


19

On my first cross-country as a student (dual), we actually transitioned through the class B airspace just north of us, flew to a smaller airport north of town, did a landing there, followed by flying back to the class B and landing at the primary airport there before returning home. Basically, I had a few key experiences: The controllers work quickly and ...


19

Short answer: you can fly in Yosemite Valley at 500ft AGL (most likely); there's no special regulation applicable there; the wording on the sectional is a non-regulatory 'encouragement' only. By regulation, the minimum altitudes under VFR are in 14 CFR 19.119: (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power unit fails, an emergency landing without undue ...


19

T is used to signify that the top of Class C airspace that lies under Class B is the bottom surface of that airspace. This is important when the Class C segment lies under multiple layers of Class B, where no single top altitude applies.


18

In Bernstein of Leigh v Skyviews [1978] 1 QB 479, the High Court of England and Wales held that, at common law, the right of a landowner to the airspace above their land was "to such height as was necessary for the ordinary use and enjoyment of his land and the structures upon it". As another answer has suggested, the use of UK airspace is now regulated by ...


18

This is a great question. For those who are unfamiliar, and in areas where airspace is complex, it’s sometimes useful to look at the VFR Flyway Chart. This is the one on the back of FAA Terminal Area Charts. The dashed blue outlines surround the crazy cutouts that are Seattle’s Class D airspaces. Why does KBFI stick into the KSEA Class B? Class D airports,...


18

Is there a NOTAM or a temporary flight restriction associated with laser ranging activity? Apparently yes: The lasers on the telescopes are in the range of 15-40 watts. The FAA calls a no-fly zone over the area when a laser is in use, and two people have to stand around outside in the freezing temperatures and watch for airplanes. Each of them has a kill ...


18

Generally: By Using a (Physical) Map Aviation charts have landmarks and airspaces on them, which you can use to estimate where you're at. Other answers give great examples of this already, I don't have to repeat it. But I thought I could add some real life experience here: 1) Memorizing the Area Glider pilots, especially trainees, often fly without maps ...


17

There are several big differences between working around a Class B airport versus a Class C. Explicit clearance required. Operation in Class C airspace simply requires establishing two-way contact with the airport approach prior to entry. Now, it's good manners either way to request entry or indicate your plans involve entry; while it's legal to transition ...


17

In general, a diplomatic clearance is required for overflight of military aircraft over other countries. The aircraft are considered state aircraft and prior clearance has to be obtained through diplomatic channels. Note that the clearance is usually issued by the defence ministry of the concerned country. The mode of clearance and monitoring varies from ...


17

Not mentioned in the other answers is simply logistics coordination. If you can't fly over Pakistan, that suggests that maybe you have to fly somewhere else. Perhaps flying around means an overflight of China or Kyrgyzstan. Do they charge overflight fees? Do they require prior permits? Even if the money involved isn't huge, starting up a new route may ...


16

Since gliders have no engines, they are often permitted to operate under special agreements called Letters of Authorization, which permit them to operate where other aircraft may not. These agreements may permit them to fly VFR in Class A airspace to capture mountain wave lift, through TFRs, through Restricted airspace, depending on the terms of the ...


16

A "Counseling Session" is the lightest slap on the wrist the FAA can give you (aside from doing nothing). Basically it means "you screwed up, you know you screwed up, and we (the FAA) know you know you screwed up" -- they just want to sit you down with someone from the FSDO (probably a FAA Safety Team representative) and have a conversation to make sure ...


16

Military pilot here. I can certainly understand why there's confusion surrounding MOA's, having been a Private Pilot long before I flew for the military, and I'm glad you asked the question. The second post you referenced is exactly right. It is extremely common (at least in our training areas) to have dogfighting and other tactical training with ...


15

Class F airspace is often used in the UK as a kind of "GA airway." It designates preferred paths with a advisory ATC service that GA traffic can use. For example, there is a class F route defined between the north west of England and the Isle of Man. Having a preferred route and an ATC service makes sense for that route as its an expanse of open water. It ...


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