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70

Mainly because in the situation that you describe, the airplane is perfectly capable of flying. You don't need an engine to fly as airplanes are designed to glide without it. Part of every pilots training is how to land the airplane when this happens. Many of the same issues also apply in the smaller airplanes. Unless the pilot and the passengers fly ...


66

Short Answer Batteries would need to be somewhere around 16.7MJ/kg to give the same range and performance as liquid fuels, this is about 18.5 times the capacity of the best lithium-ion batteries. Price-wise it will cost about 30-35% to charge your airplane as opposed to fill it with liquid fuels at today's prices. Long Answer This is a good question ...


56

I've had this happen a few times on aging C152's and in all cases I have been able to simply push it against the airflow enough to pull it closed. On a PA28 with the door the other side of the cabin from the pilot seat, this wouldnt be possible. Not that I have experienced it in a PA28, but I might ask a passenger to attempt the same (hard push followed by a ...


55

The other answers are good, but don't touch on one key method... Prevention. Small aircraft like a Cessna 172 have a limited cruise time, about 4 hours maximum. They are small enough that they get relatively uncomfortable after 2-3 hours, and if flying in turbulence or challenging conditions, flights can be relatively short. The best way I've found to ...


54

Can you? Absolutely, and air traffic control will treat you (almost) like any other airplane. You are supposedly handled on a first-come-first-serve basis (reality is slightly different with different aircraft speeds, etc.). Do the airlines like it if you slow them down? No, but it's part of the system and the way that it works. Very often, there are ...


51

First off, you absolutely made the correct decision. As PIC/pilot you have not only the ability, but the duty to call off any flight you don't feel comfortable regardless of the reason. Your go/no go decision can be based off of anything and you should always be comfortable making that decision. Now as far as the battery goes I can tell you I was in exactly ...


50

What that probably means is that the pilot is reporting that they have ATIS information kilo. Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) is a radio broadcast on a specific frequency (often a local navaid like a VOR) which a pilot dials up to get weather and airport information before joining one of the airfield's frequencies. Each time the information is ...


47

A quote from the book of regulations, Chapter 14, part 23, verse 951(b): (b) Each fuel system must be arranged so that— (1) No fuel pump can draw fuel from more than one tank at a time; or (2) There are means to prevent introducing air into the system. On a high wing aircraft satisfying #2 on that list is pretty easy: If you connect both tanks to ...


45

When every transmission to the tower begins with "Executive Tower...." that is the keyword that makes the controller's ears perk up and start taking notes. If you don't say the magic words, your controller may be a step or two behind as you rattle off your request. Also, you think you're on the right frequency, and you think you know who you're talking to, ...


43

Best case scenario: You're straight and level, on frequency with some form of human being, there's no immediate danger and you have the know-how to transmit. In that case, that human will provide you with everything they possibly can to help you. Most important thing for you to do is keep the aircraft away from clouds, away from terrain and not panic. You'll ...


39

Short-field take-off techniques often achieve a shorter ground run by hurting climb performance. While having more runway is great for safety, planning to use less of the runway is not a huge benefit: you always plan to have enough runway left if you need to abort during the take-off roll. It's much better to have more height quickly in the climb-out: it ...


37

For me, it seems that air can escape the parachute by this hole That's the point, air HAS to escape the parachute anyway, and without the hole it would do so laterally and in an uneven fashion, leading to lateral oscillations. The hole allows the air to escape in a controlled location, avoiding undesired and possibly dangerous oscillations. Some (most ...


36

Do whatever it says in the POH for your aircraft. This is from the C172S POH, for example: Accidental opening of a cabin door in flight due to improper closing does not constitute a need to land the airplane. The best procedure is to set up the airplane in a trimmed condition at approximately 75 KIAS, momentarily shove the door outward slightly, and ...


36

The first thing you're going to want to do is get fresh air into the cabin, by ensuring the vents/windows are open. This will dilute the amount of CO in the cabin and stop your symptoms getting worse - allowing you to land as soon as practical. There is also some good information online which contains further advice: Turn the cabin heat fully off. ...


35

Before we get started, I should mention that the most basic constant-speed propellers were driven by balancing air pressure and centrifugal force. The blades were shaped in such a way, or equipped with a counterweight that would cause the blade to intrinsically move to a shallow pitch. However, when air was moved over the blade, it would begin to overpower ...


35

My favourite entry in my logbook is 2013-08-02 KOSH-KORD 1.5 hrs – from Air Venture in Oshkosh straight into Chicago O'Hare, in a Cessna 172 :-) A friend of mine and I have flown into SFO (with our instructor), and dropped of my friend, who then took a Lufthansa flight to Munich. So, having flown into SFO, ORD, and SAN (San Diego, the busiest single-runway ...


35

Visual detection To take one example, a vehicle-launched ground to air missile system (e.g. the SA-11) that can reach the cruising altitude of airliners travels at several thousand miles per hour and takes perhaps 30 to 40 seconds from launch to reach its target. Pilots don't have an especially good view of the ground immediately below and would have a ...


35

From a safety perspective both pilots should be handling any emergency that arises, each working to their individual strengths and expertise to ensure a safe outcome. This is exactly what you did in the scenario you describe. In terms of who calls the shots (acts as PIC for the emergency), generally the most qualified pilot onboard should be the one giving ...


34

If you take off with a storm 20 minutes away from the airport, it won't have been "unforecast"; the NWS is much better than that. They can pretty accurately predict what's going to happen regarding various fronts at least 24 hours in advance, in turn giving you the advance notice to adjust your flight schedule to ensure you can get around the storm or well ...


32

No because aircraft are categorized by their speed at the runway threshold (1.3 times stall speed). VAT —Speed at threshold used by ICAO (1.3 times stall speed in the landing configuration at maximum certificated landing mass) By knowing the category, ATC is able to use appropriate speeds. The category is not actually listed anywhere, so the controller ...


31

Googling the plane's registration number (this one is N6361F) is almost always enough to identify the plane. In this case, FlightAware is high on the list of hits and says that the plane is a Cessna 337A, built in 1966. Searching for "Cessna 337A" then leads to Wikipedia for more information.


29

There are actually two separate coding systems in play here. IATA (International Air Transport Association) codes are 3 letters and are used for commercial bookings etc. They are assigned only to commercial airports throughout the world. ORD is the IATA code for Chicago O'Hare. Pilots and ATC use the four letter ICAO (International Civil Aviation Authority)...


28

In regions and weather conditions where this is likely to be a problem, other fuels are used instead of Jet-A. For example, Jet-B has a freezing point of -60C and is used during the winter in some parts of Russia and other very cold places. For information about fuel freezing in flight, see this previous question/answer.


28

I have had success with these things. They are basically a little baggy that has the same stuff they put in a diaper. You can always wear adult diapers (and I have heard of it being done) Some small planes can be fitted with a pilot relief tube. This is effectively a tube connected to a small venturi outside the plane. The venturi creates a low pressure ...


27

Just to add to Lnafziger's answer (which is entirely correct), the FAA has designated five airports as "High Density Traffic Airports" (covered in FAR Part 93 Subpart K) which specifically limit the number of scheduled IFR arrivals, and it's easy to misread that as "you can't land here." Part 93.129 specifically says: (a) IFR. The operator of an aircraft ...


26

In short: Yes, you can. The FAA doesn't really care, as long as you're not going to interrupt class B or C operations. And honestly as long as you're not hosting a dozen other aircraft, how are they going to tell the difference between a field and an airstrip? If you want it on a chart or you are near special airspace, you need to contact the FSDO and talk ...


26

This has happened before and it usually ends ok, the most important thing is to keep calm. One suggestion I would have is instead of flying straight and level I would fly a box over the current location while you speak to ATC. This will keep you in range of the ATC station you are talking to and keep you out of trouble. If you fly straight and level the ...


26

It's one of many privately owned Aero L-39s, some of which are in the US. Here's one registered in Georgia, USA, with a similar livery at the same airport: (flickr.com) N915WE. N915WE Aero L39C Preparing for takeoff. Falcon Field-Peachtree City, Ga. It could actually be the same one you photographed.


25

You didn't specify the jurisdiction that you were asking about, but in the US there is a regulation that covers the minimum that you must do before flying. Much of it is common sense: You want to check the weather, because it can impact you much more than it usually does in your car and you don't want to get stuck in a really bad situation. You want to ...


24

It's a holdover from the old days when microphone technology wasn't as advanced. The military adopted "dynamic microphones" as the standard, which were less noisy than the alternative "carbon microphones." Carbon microphones required a DC bias voltage to operate, and the dynamic ones did not. Fast forward to current airplane microphones, which are ...


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