Hot answers tagged

61

The short and sweet answer to this question: That kind of thinking is what kills a lot of pilots. A non-instrument rated pilot may know how to fly and navigate but does not yet have the skill to do so in total reliance upon instruments. A PPL does require you to have at least 3 hours of simulated instrument flying with an instructor. That may keep you ...


41

A license, once granted, is good forever (barring some enforcement action). But, you need more than just a license to fly. To use your license, while flying solo, you also need a Medical Certificate (if required for the aircraft or flight rules) and a Current BFR (Biennial Flight Review). Medical Certificates are good for 5 years until you're 40, then ...


41

I did it in 17 days - start to finish. Did flight school in Arizona. Before I went, I got the PPL study guide, MS Flight Simulator complete with a yoke, pedals, and throttle quadrant... and put in dozens of hours just learning the instrument scan and practicing virtual stuff. When I got to the flight school, I already knew the parts of the plane, and ...


34

For a non-commercial flight under Part 91 rules there are no issues I'm aware of with letting a non-rated passenger handle the controls - and it's done quite frequently (I can't think of any pilots I know offhand who haven't had someone else take the controls for one reason or another). The rated pilot is still pilot-in-command of the flight and ...


31

I find that virtually all the passengers I've let fly for the first time were already so scared of the controls that no "safety briefing" of that sort was necessary. Don't fight me on the controls. If I say let go, let go immediately. If you suspect there's even a remote chance of either of these problems, maybe you shouldn't be letting this person ...


31

AOPA has an article under Pilot Resources that specifically covers this situation called Logging Pilot-in-Command (PIC) Time (emphasis added by me): Unlike driving cars, the PIC may allow anyone, including a non-pilot, a pilot who may not legally act as pilot in command, or another fully qualified pilot fly the airplane, or be "sole manipulator of the ...


29

That's pretty much the checkride in a nutshell - for all the details on what's expected you should refer to the FAA Practical Test Standards for the rating you're pursuing. Before your checkride At some point before your checkride you must take a "knowledge test" (the "written exam") - you must pass that exam in order to qualify to take the checkride (the "...


29

Because it is very difficult to navigate with instruments alone. I just wished to illustrate to you by giving you an example. (These are flight simulation images, but should illustrate the idea well.) Try landing a plane like this: (hint: you're on a ~30 degrees intercept to an ILS) Ops, it appears that you just lost your vacuum pump and your attitude ...


23

Once in the air, the pilot's most basic task in manipulating the controls is to keep the airplane right side up. As it turns out, this is much easier to do when we have reference to an outside real horizon miles across rather than an inside artificial horizon a few inches across. We can do it, and we can even internalize doing it just as we have internalized ...


20

I'm assuming you didn't do the editing while you were sitting in the cockpit, flying the plane. Charge him whatever you want for your time sitting at home on the computer. It doesn't matter where the footage was filmed, if you're charging him to cut it up, edit it together, and render. Even an aerial photography company will itemize the charges and list ...


19

The absolute minimum would be about 45 hours. The FAA requires 40 hours of flight time, the completion of an aeronautical knowledge course, a written test, and a flight test. This assumes that you can read and memorize all the necessary aeronautical knowledge in an hour and a half. In the realm of humans who like to eat and sleep and actually learn and such,...


19

Flight time is only considered compensation when the pilot is not paying all the costs associated with the flight. If the costs are to be shared the following advice is recommended. A private pilot can be compensated, up to a pro-rata share, of the cost of that specific flight. This would include rental fees, fuel, oil and such. It does not include items ...


18

The trick my CFI taught me is to use your Course Deviation Indicator or ADF to keep track of landings. After your first landing, bug a course of 010. After your second landing, bug 020. You can reach over and adjust the knob after every landing without having to juggle a pen and a notebook. It's still a manual step, though. You could also use a product like ...


17

From a private pilot's perspective, there are two possible options: a foreign-based license or a 'full' FAA pilot's license. The first type is defined in 14 CFR 61.75, which starts like this: §61.75 Private pilot certificate issued on the basis of a foreign pilot license. (a) General. A person who holds a foreign pilot license at the private ...


15

The other answers have provided some easy ways to increment your count without too much distraction, but if you are really "prone to forget [...] when things get busy" as you say, this might not be good enough. I would therefore recommend a solution which does not require any action on your side. Most smartphones today have a pressure sensor. There ...


14

I go once or twice a week if the weather holds and I'm up to almost 8 months (and I am still not done (PPL)). I work with a guy who religiously went 3 days a week and said he got it done (at a part 61 school) in 6 months (almost exactly). The limiting factors are of course money (which does not sound like you are worried about if you are planning an ...


14

You have a few questions here that should be addressed individually. What is a realistic path for me? Get your PPL then start to consider what you can fly/own. As you train you will inevitably learn about the various major airframes people fly and what it takes to own one. As a word to the wise you should read this thread about a young guy who figured ...


13

It will not work in EASA for a variety of reasons. Of the top of my head: Like Lnafziger mentioned, you will need to do at least 10 hours solo. Most jet engines (but the smallest such as the D-Jet) have a minimum required crew of two. Also, you are not allowed to switch airplanes in the PPL course (ie. fly solo with one airplane and dual with another see ...


13

Jeff, I really appreciate that you ask for safety before asking for the price. Unfortunately it takes some experience and time at a school to say if the equipment and teaching methods are safe or not, but I'll try my best to provide you with some of my insights into flight training. I personally tend to the bigger flight schools. Having a strict training ...


13

You will be examined in 3 ways, written, oral and practical. The checkride consists of only the oral and practical portions of the exams. The written is computer based and must have been completed with the 2 years preceding the checkride. When you complete the written you will get a sheet that is stamped and embossed certifying your score and listing your ...


12

The plain and simple answer to your updated question is that once you get your pilot license, it is good forever. You can go 50 years without flying, and the license itself is still valid. When it comes time to fly again, depending on the type of airplane that you want to fly, you will probably also need a medical. You will need to have a Flight Review ...


12

Yes, the FAA currently offers a lapel pin at the completion of each phase of the WINGS program. This "reward" is not automatically awarded or delivered, the WINGS participant must request it. Upon completion of each of a phase, for example Basic, Advanced, or Master, the FAA Safety Team will include the following notice: If you have not already done so, ...


12

Get a Tally Counter, and push the button once per landing. No batteries, nothing to fail, easy to use. Not much more you could ask for. https://tallycounterstore.com/finger-tally-counter-quantity-discounts/ There are even options for mounted ones. https://tallycounterstore.com/mounted-tally-counter/


11

Yes, with a couple of exceptions. FAR 61.123 contains the requirements for a commercial certificate, while 61.153 contains the requirements for an ATP certificate. FAR 61.123(h) states than an applicant must: Hold at least a private pilot certificate issued under this part or meet the requirements of §61.73 FAR 61.73 refers to the option for military ...


11

LASIK is a type of refractive eye surgery and according to EASA's medical standards, you can be considered "fit" to fly after surgery if several conditions are met. The conditions depend on the class of medical; private pilots usually have a class 2 medical. For class 1: (1) After refractive surgery, a fit assessment may be considered, provided that:...


11

You cannot do so. A private pilot’s license - at least in the US - prohibits you from offering airman services for compensation or hire. If you intend to fly professionally, you will need at least a commercial pilot’s certificate. An instrument rating is also highly recommended as is multi engine class ratings for the greatest chances of employment. ...


11

Yes. But you will still need instrument rating and ATPL theory as this is multi crew aircraft. The amount of learning will be the same as to get CPL. Maybe fees for the license will be lower but who cares if you buy an A380?


10

It's hard to give you specific advice for India because I'm not familiar with the regulations and standards there (your best bet would be to give the DGCA a call and ask if they have any publications you can review). Broadly speaking all countries are going to expect you to know much of the same material however (because all airplanes essentially fly the ...


10

Yes, at least in the US it is completely reasonable to do it in 2-3 months. I believe you can achieve this easily in a month's time if you're doing it full time. The following applies to the US, where I'm most familiar with the rules. The process in the US as an alien is as follows: Find a flight school and notify them that you'd like to begin flight ...


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